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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 17 17 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 9 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 4 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 2 2 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 2 2 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The mistakes of Gettysburg. (search)
ve they would have needed any reply from me. General Lee would have answered them himself, and have set history right. But, even as the matter is, I do not fear the verdict of history on Gettysburg. Time sets all things right. Error lives but a day-truth is eternal. There is an incidental matter to which I shall refer in this connection. It is in regard to a statement made by Mr. Swinton. In his Ultimo Suspiro, he gives the history of a meeting which he says took place on the 7th of April, 1865, between General Lee and his leading officers. He says that this meeting was a private council, and that the officers united in advising General Lee to surrender on that day-two days before the surrender took place at Appomattox. In describing that meeting, he does me the grave injustice of putting my name among the officers who gave General Lee this advice. The truth of the matter is, I never attended any such meeting. I had no time to have done so. I was kept incessantly busy in
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 15: evacuation of Richmond and the Petersburg lines.--retreat and surrender. (search)
hat it was the duty of the authorities to negotiate for peace now, and that for every man killed somebody would be responsible, and it would be little better than murder. Influenced by such reflections, he wrote the following communication: April 7, 1865. General: The result of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my duty to shift from myself the respo Humphreys, who sent it at once through his lines to Lee, who was still in the position from which he had repulsed Humphreys's attack that day. Humphreys received Grant's note at 8.30 P. M., and Grant, Lee's reply after midnight, which read: April 7, 1865. General: I have received your note of this date. Though not entertaining the opinion you express on the hopelessness ot further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia. I reciprocate your desire to avoid useless effusion
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Battle of Sailor's Creek-engagement at Farmville-correspondence with General Lee-Sheridan Intercepts the enemy. (search)
the incident related the night before by Dr. Smith, gave me the idea of opening correspondence with General Lee on the subject of the surrender of his army. I therefore wrote to him on this day, as follows: Headquarters Armies of the U. S., April 7, 1865, 5 P. M. General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. A. The results of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as of any further effusion of blood, by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the Confederate States army known as the Army of Northern Virginia. U. S. Grant, Lieut.-General Lee replied on the evening of the same day as follows: April 7, 1865 General:--I have received your note of this day. Though not entertaining the opinion you express on the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia, I reciprocate your desire to avoid useless effusion of
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 43: Appomattox. (search)
list presented by Pendleton. Memoirs of General Lee, A. L. Long. A little after nightfall a flag of truce appeared under torchlight in front of Mahone's line bearing a note to General Lee: Headquarters Armies of the United States, 5 P. M., April 7, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Commanding Confederate States Army: General,-- The results of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is sg Armies of the United States. I was sitting at his side when the note was delivered. He read it and handed it to me without referring to its contents. After reading it I gave it back, saying, Not yet. General Lee wrote in reply,-- April 7, 1865. General,-- I have received your note of this day. Though not entertaining the opinion you express on the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia, I reciprocate your desire to avoid useless effusion
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
immediately crossed over. The Sixth Corps and a division of cavalry crossed at Farmville to its support. Feeling now that General Lee's chance of escape was utterly hopeless, I addressed him the following communication from Farmville: April 7, 1865. General R. E. Lee: General: The result of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my duty to shift frof blood, by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the C. S. army known as the Army of Northern Virginia. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. Early on the morning of the 8th, before leaving, I received at Farmville the following: April 7, 1865. Lieut. Gen. U. S. Grant: General: I have received your note of this date. Though not entertaining the opinion you express on the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia, I reciprocate your desire t
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 29 (search)
e same. The general raised his hat in acknowledgment of the cheers, and gave a pleasant nod to each of the men who addressed him. A little before noon on April 7, 1865, General Grant, with his staff, rode into the little village of Farmville, on the south side of the Appomattox River, a town that will be memorable in history he expected to capture them before Lee could reach them, induced the general to write the following communication: Headquarters, Armies of the U. S., 5 P. M., April 7, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. A.: The results of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army ofn an hour after he received General Grant's letter, but it was brought in by a rather circuitous route, and did not reach its destination till after midnight: April 7, 1865. General: I have received your note of this date. Though not entertaining the opinion you express of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Longstreet's Second paper on Gettysburg. (search)
eve they would have needed any reply from me. General Lee would have answered them himself, and have set history right. But, even as the matter is, I do not fear the verdict of history on Gettysburg. Time sets all, things right. Error lives but a day-truth is eternal. There is an incidental matter to which I shall refer in this connection. It is in regard to a statement made by Mr. Swinton. In his Ultimo Suspiro he gives the history of a meeting which he says took place on the 7th of April, 1865, between General Lee and his leading officers. He says that this meeting was a private council, and that the officers united in advising General Lee to surrender on that day-two days before the surrender took place at Appomattox. In describing that meeting he does me the grave injustice of putting my name among the officers who gave General Lee this advice. The truth of the matter is, I never attended any such meeting. I had no time to have done so. I was kept incessantly busy in t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The surrender at Appomattox Court House. (search)
The surrender at Appomattox Court House. by Horace Porter, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. A. A little before noon on the 7th of April, 1865, General Grant, with his staff, rode into the little village of Farmville [see map, p. 569], on the south side of the Appomattox River, a town that will be memorable in history as the plapected to capture them before Lee could reach them, induced the general to write the following communication: Headquarters, armies of the U. S. 5 P. M., April 7th, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. A.: The results of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army ohour after he received General Grant's letter, but it was brought in by rather a circuitous route and did not reach its destination till after midnight: April 7TH, 1865. General: I have received your note of this date. Though not entertaining the opinion you express of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
s driven to Sailor's Creek, but striking back such vigorous blows, that there was a halt until Wheaton's division should come up. Ewell's gallant veterans stoutly resisted, until enveloped by cavalry and infantry, and charged on flank and rear by horse and foot, when they threw down their arms and surrendered. Among the six thousand men then made prisoners, were Ewell and four other-generals. Lee succeeded in crossing the Appomattox over the bridges at Farmville that night, April 6 and 7, 1865. with his dreadfully shattered army. He tried to make that stream an impassable barrier between his force and its pursuers, by destroying the bridges behind him. Only the railway bridge was consumed, that of the wagon road being saved by the van of Humphreys's corps. The flames were smothered, and Barlow's brigade crossed over in expectation of a fight, but he found there only a feeble rearguard, which retired after a slight skirmish, abandoning eighteen guns in Retreat of the Confedera
April 5th 1865. General S. Cooper. I have the honor to request that a Court of Inquiry be assembled at the earliest practicable moment to investigate and report upon the facts and statements contained in my official report of the operations of the Army of the Tennessee. J. B. Hood, Lieutenant General. I received the following in reply: Danville, April 5th, 1865. Lieutenant General J. B. Hood. Proceed to Texas as heretofore ordered. S. Cooper, A. I. G. Danville, April 7th, 1865. Lieutenant General J. B. Hood. A Court of Inquiry cannot be convened in your case at present. You will proceed to Texas as heretofore ordered. S. Cooper, A. I. G. Had I been granted a Court of Inquiry at that date, I would have produced stronger testimony than I have given, even at this late period, in relation to the points in controversy between General Johnston and myself. This attempt to summons me before a Court Martial was his final effort, during the war, to asperse
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