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25 for 1; November 15th, 28 for 1; December 1st, 32 for 1; December 31st, 51 for 1. 1865.-January 1st, 60 for 1; February 1st, 50 for 1; April 1st, 70 for 1; April 15th, 80 for 1; April 20th, 100 for 1; April 26th, 200 for 1: April 28th, 500 for ; April 29th, 800 for 1; April 30th, 1,000 for 1, May 1st (last actual sale of Confederate notes), 1,200 for 1. General Lee's fare well order to the army of northern Virginia. General order, no. 9. Headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, April 10, 1865. After four years of arduous service, marked by unsurpassed courage and fortitude, the Army of Northern Virginia has been compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and resources. I need not tell the brave survivors of so many hard-fought battles, who have remained steadfast to the last, that I have consented to this result from no distrust ofthem; but, feeling that valor and devotion could accomplish nothing that would compensate for the loss that must have attended the continuance
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 15: evacuation of Richmond and the Petersburg lines.--retreat and surrender. (search)
through the war together; I have done my best for you; my heart is too full to say more. It was a simple but most affecting scene. On the next day a formal leave of his army was taken by General Lee. headquarters army of Northern Virginia, April 10, 1865. After four years of arduous service, marked by unsurpassed courage and fortitude, the Army of Northern Virginia has been compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and resources. I need not tell the survivors of so many hard-fought battlender; the details were prepared by three officers on each side, and were as follows: Agreement entered into this day in regard to the surrender of the army of Northern Virginia to the United States authorities:Appomattox Court House, Va., April 10, 1865. 1. The troops shall march by brigades and detachments to a designated point; stack their arms, deposit their flags, sabers, pistols, etc., and thence march to their homes, under charge of their officers, superintended by their respective
sad that after four years of bravery and devotion to the cause, he should be brought to his native city, for the defence of which he would have gladly given his life, dangerously if not mortally wounded, when its sad fate is just decided. I love to sit by his bedside and try to cheer him; his friends seem to vie with each other in kind attentions to him. We hear rumours of battles, and of victories gained by our troops, but we have no certain information beyond the city lines. April 10th, 1865. Another gloomy Sabbath-day and harrowing night. We went to St. Paul's in the morning, and heard a very fine sermon from Dr. Minnegerode-at least so said my companions. My attention, which is generally riveted by his sermons, wandered continually. I could not listen; I felt so strangely, as if in a vivid, horrible dream. Neither President was prayed for; in compliance with some arrangement with the Federal authorities, the prayer was used as for all in authority! How fervently d
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
First. The Atlanta campaign, from the 1st of July, 1864, to the occupation of the city, September 2, 1864. Second. The new defenses of Atlanta and the Savannah campaign, including the time from the 3d of September, 1864, to the 25th of January, 1865. Third. The campaign from Savannah, Ga., to Goldsborough, N. C., from January 25, 1865, to March 22, 1865. Fourth. The campaign from Goldsborough, N. C., to Raleigh, N. C., and the march from Raleigh to Washington City, from April 10, 1865, to 20th of May, 1865. The operations connected with the march of General Sherman's army, extending over a great portion of the Southern States, were of a very rapid character. Such of them as legitimately belonged to the engineer department were so intimately blended with the whole that it is impossible to separate them. In order to explain clearly why bridges were built and roads made in the localities where they were, it will be necessary to give the movements of the army somewh
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 44: the lack of food and the prices in the Confederacy. (search)
ret20.00 Sherry35.00 Liquors, per Drink. French brandy3.00 Rye whiskey2.00 Apple brandy2.00 Malt Liquors, per Bottle. Porter12.00 Ale12.00 Ale, one-half bottle6.00 Cigars. Fine Havana1.00 Game of all kinds in season. Terrapins served up in every style. Bill for a dinner for nine poor Confederates at the Oriental, January 17, 1864. Soup for nine$13 50Brought forward$132 50 Venison steak31 50Apples12 00 Fried potatoes9 005 bottles of Madeira250 00 Seven birds24 006 bottles of claret120 00 Baked potatoes9 00Urn cocktail65 00 Celery13 50Jelly20 00 Bread and butter14 00Cake20 00 Coffee18 001 dozen cigars12 00 $1132 50$631 50 Approximate value of gold and Confederate currency from January 1, 1862, to April 12, 1865. Date.Gold.Currency. January 1, 1862$100$120 December 20, 1862100300 December 20, 18631001,700 January 1, 18641001,800 December 20, 186410002,800 January 1, 18651003400 February 1, 18651005,000 March 1, 18651004,700 April 10, 18651005,500
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The surrender at Appomattox Court House. (search)
general, who signed it, and other copies were then made for transmission to the corps commanders and the staff of the army. All these copies were signed by the general, and a good many persons sent other copies which they had made or procured, and obtained his signature. In this way many copies of the order had the general's name signed as if they were originals, some of which I have seen. The text of the order as issued was as follows: headquarters, Army of Northern Virginia, April 10th, 1865. After four years of arduous service, marked by unsurpassed courage and fortitude, the Army of Northern Virginia has been compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and resources. I need not tell the survivors of so many hard-fought battles, who have remained steadfast to the last, that I have consented to this result from no distrust of them, but, feeling that valor and devotion could accomplish nothing that could compensate for the loss that would have attended the continuation of
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 19: the repossession of Alabama by the Government. (search)
erals Lidell, Cockerell, and Thomas, and other officers of high rank, and three thousand men, as prisoners of war. The spoils were nearly forty pieces of artillery, four thousand small-arms, sixteen battle-flags, and a vast quantity of ammunition. The Confederates lost, in killed and wounded, about five hundred men. The National loss was about one thousand. The Nationals were now in undisputed possession of the whole eastern shore of the bay. The army and navy spent all the next day April 10, 1865. in careful reconnoitering, preparing for an advance on Mobile. Some of the gun-boats attempted to go up to Blakely, but were checked by a heavy fire from Forts Huger and Tracy. From these island batteries full two hundred shells were thrown at the navy during that and the next day, when, as we have seen, the garrisons of both spiked their guns, and fled in the shadows of night. April 11. Meanwhile the Thirteenth Army Corps had been taken across the bay, for an attack on Mobile, in co
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
lithographed, in Baltimore, with a portrait of Lee at its head, surrounded by Confederate flags, and a fac-simile of his signature at its foot; and it became a cherished document and ornament in the houses of the enemies of the Republic. By that warrant, these people said, substantially, to the writer, we will attempt to regain the Lost Cause. The following is a copy of Lee's Farewell Address:-- General orders, no. 9. Headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, Appomattox C. H., April 10, 1865. After four years of arduous service, marked by unsurpassed courage and fortitude, the Army of Northern Virginia has been compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and resources. I need not tell the brave survivors of so many hard fought battles, who have remained steadfast to the last, that I have consented to this result from no distrust of them; but feeling that valor and devotion could accomplish nothing to compensate for the loss that must have attended a continuation of the co
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 22: campaign of the Carolinas. February and March, 1866. (search)
der the charge of Major-General Q. A. Gillmore, commanding the department. Among the ceremonies will be the delivery of a public address by the Rev. Henry Ward Beecher. 4. That the naval forces at Charleston, and their commander on that station, be invited to participate in the ceremonies of the occasion. By order of the President of the United States, Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. [General order no. 41.] headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, South Carolina, April 10, 1865. Friday next, the 14th inst., will be the fourth anniversary of the cap. ture of Fort Sumter by the rebels. A befitting celebration on that day, in honor of its reoccupation by the national forces, has been ordered by the President, in pursuance of which Brevet Major-General Robert Anderson, United States Army, will restore to its original place on the fort the identical flag which, after an honorable and gallant defense, he was compelled to lower to the insurgents in South Carolina,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence of Fort Gregg. (search)
fence of Fort Gregg. [The heroic defence of Fort Gregg showed the spirit of the remnant of our grand old army, and illumines the sad page of its history which tells of the closing scenes of the Defence of Petersburg. We have never seen in print any official account of the brilliant affair, and are glad to be able to present the following from the original Ms. report kindly furnished us by General James H. Lane.] Brigadier-General Lane's official report. Appomattox Courthouse, April 10, 1865. Major: I have the honor to report that on the night of the 1st of April, four regiments of my brigade, with intervals between the men varying from six to ten paces, were stretched along the works between Battery Gregg and Hatcher's Run, in the following order from right to left: Twenty-eighth, Thirty-seventh, Eighteenth, Thirty-third--the right of the Twenty-eighth resting near the brown house in front of General McRae's winterquarters, and the left of the Thirty-third on the branch
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