hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 3 3 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 3 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 66 results in 48 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first step in the War. (search)
ength to the inaccessible mass that surrounded it and made it impregnable. It was never taken, but the operations of General Sherman, after his march to the sea, compelled its evacuation, and the Stars and Stripes were again raised over it, April 14th, 1865. Under an order from Secretary Stanton, the same flag that was lowered, April 14th, 1861, was raised again over Sumter, by Major (then General) Anderson, on April 14th, 1865, the day President Lincoln was shot. Of Major Anderson's formery Stanton, the same flag that was lowered, April 14th, 1861, was raised again over Sumter, by Major (then General) Anderson, on April 14th, 1865, the day President Lincoln was shot. Of Major Anderson's former officers, Generals Abner Doubleday and Norman J. Hall and Chaplain Matthias Harris were present. The Rev. Henry Ward Beecher delivered an oration, and other prominent antislavery men attended the ceremony.-editors. View of Cumming's Point. From a sketch made after the bombardment.
e shot of the long struggle were made and received as true. The most reliable would appear to be the followingt reproduced from a paper printed by the boys of Mr. Denson's school, in the village of Pittsboro, N. C., in 1866: The accomplished author of that series of interesting papers, The last ninety days of the war in North Carolina, published in The Watchman, New York, states that the last blood of the war was shed near the Atkins plantation, a few miles from Chapel Hill, on the 14th April, 1865. In a later number of the same paper, a member of the First Tennessee Cavalry says that it is a mistake; that companies F1 and F2 of the same regiment to which he belonged, skirmished sharply with the Federals on the 15th, and claims that this was the last blood shed. Both are in error: there was a skirmish near Mt. Zion church, two miles south-east of Pittsboro. North Carolina. between a body of Wheeler's cavalry and a party of Federals, on the 17th of April; two Yankees were wound
-how Grant's hundreds of thousands overcame our little band, history, not I, must tell my children's children. It is enough for me to tell them that all that bravery and self-denial could do has been done. We do not yet give up all hope. General Johnston is in the field, but there are thousands of the enemy to his tens. The citizens are quiet. The calmness of despair is written on every countenance. Private sorrows are now coming upon us. We know of but few casualties. Good-Friday, April 14, 1865. As usual, I went to the hospital, and found Miss T. in much trouble. A peremptory order has been given by the Surgeon-General to remove all patients. In the opinion of our surgeon, to five of them it would be certain death. The ambulances were at the door. Miss T. and myself decided to go at once to the Medical Director and ask him to recall the order. We were conducted to his office, and, for the first time since the entrance of the Federal army, were impolitely treated. O
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 13: the siege and evacuation of Fort Sumter. (search)
he broken structure. See sketch of the interior of Fort Sumter on page 325. It had been evacuated, not surrendered. The sovereignty of the Republic, symbolized in the flag, had not been yielded to the insurgents. That flag had been lowered, but not given up — dishonored, but not captured. It was borne away by the gallant commander, with a resolution to raise it again over the battered fortress, or be wrapped in it as his winding-sheet at the last. Precisely four years from that day, April 14, 1865.--after four years of terrible civil war--Major Anderson, bearing the title of Major-General in the Armies of the United States, again raised that tattered flag over all that remained of Fort Sumter--a heap of ruins. See picture of the ruins on the preceding page. The Isabel lay under the battered walls of the fort, waiting for a favoring tide, until Monday morning, April 15, 1861. when she conveyed the garrison to the Baltic, then commanded by Captain Fletcher. The insurgent so
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
ates. On the reverse is an altar, bearing the following inscription, also in French: Lincoln, honest man, abolished slavery, re-established the Union, and saved the Republic, without Veiling the statue of Liberty. He was assassinated the 14TH of April, 1865. Below all are the words, Liberty, Equality, Fraternity. On one side of the altar stands winged Victory, with her right hand resting upon a sword, and her left holding a civic wreath. On the other side stand two emancipated slaves — theervice during the war, was 2,656,553. The Provost-Marshal-General, James B. Fry, reported that the aggregate quotas charged against the several States, under all calls of the President for troops, from the 15th of April, 1861, up to the 14th of April, 1865, when a cessation of drafting and recruiting was ordered, were 2,759,049. The aggregate number of men credited on the several calls, and put into the service of the Republic (in the army, navy, and marine corps) during that period, was, as
the railroad south-westward from Greensborough to Salisbury; and all were pressing keenly forward, intent on a battle or a capitulation by the enemy, when he received from his outposts the following overture: Headquarters in the field, April 14, 1865. Major-General W. T. Sherman, Commanding United States Forces: General — The results of the recent campaigns in Virginia have changed the relative military condition of the belligerents. I am therefore induced to address you, in this formts to terminate the existing war. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. E. Johnston, General. The prompt response was as follows: headquarters Mil. Div. Of the Miss., in the field, Raleigh, N. C., April 14, 1865. Gen. J. E. Johnston, Commanding Confederate Army: General — I have this moment received your communication of this date. I am fully empowered to arrange with you any terms for the suspension of further hostilities as between the armies c
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 22: campaign of the Carolinas. February and March, 1866. (search)
that his precious remains should have been so treated by the brutes into whose hands they fell, adds even to the bitterness of death. I am now awaiting the hour when I can pay my last duties to his memory. With my best and sincere wishes, my dear general, for your success and happiness, I am, most truly, your friend, J. A. Dahlgren. [General Order No. 50.] War Department Adjutant-General's office, Washington, March 27, 1865. Ordered--1. That at the hour of noon, on the 14th day of April, 1865, Brevet Major-General Anderson will raise and plant upon the ruins of Fort Sumter, in Charleston Harbor, the same United States flag which floated over the battlements of that fort during the rebel assault, and which was lowered and saluted by him and the small force of his command when the works were evacuated on the 14th day of April, 1861. 2. That the flag, when raised, be saluted by one hundred guns from Fort Sumter, and by a national salute from every fort and rebel battery t
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
. I ordered the railroad to be finished up to Raleigh, so that I could operate from it as a base, and then made-- [Special Field Orders, No. 55.] headquarters military division of the Mississippi, in the field, Raleigh, North Carolina, April 14, 1865. The next movement will be on Ashboroa, to turn the position of the enemy at the Company's shops in rear of Haw River Bridge, and at Greensboroa, and to cut off his only available line of retreat by Salisbury and Charlotte: 1. General Kect being to permit the civil authorities to enter into the needful arrangements to terminate the existing war. To which I replied as follows: headquarters military division of the Mississippi, in the field, Raleigh, North Carolina, April 14, 1865 General J. E. Johnston, commanding Confederate Army. General: I have this moment received your communication of this date. I am fully empowered to arrange with you any terms for the suspension of further hostilities between the armies com
n, 30 killed, 182 wounded, 100 missing; Confed., 25 killed, 100 wounded, 70 missing. September 4, 1864: Greenville, Tenn. Union, 9th and 13th Tenn., and 10th Mich. Cav.; Confed., Morgan's Cav. Losses: Union, 6 wounded; Confed., 10 killed, 60 wounded, 75 missing; Confed., Gen. John H. Morgan killed. Fort Sumter in 1865. The shapeless ruins of Sumter, demolished by eighteen months of almost constant fire from Federal batteries, appear in the top picture, of April 14, 1865, the anniversary of Major Anderson's evacuation in 1861. Next comes the Federal fleet dressed with flags for the celebration; and below, a group at the foot of the pole listening to Henry Ward Beecher. In the foreground stand the soldiers and sailors who had taken part in the ceremonies of raising on the shining white staff the very flag that had been lowered exactly four years earlier. On the night of this gala occasion President Lincoln was shot in Washington. Sumter had in a sense
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
the Sciota This scene on the vessel's deck was photographed shortly after she had been raised after being sunk by a torpedo in Mobile Bay. Two days after the Federal flag was raised over the courthouse in Mobile, the Sciota, while hurrying across the bay, ran into one of these hidden engines of destruction. A terrific explosion followed and the Sciota sank immediately in twelve feet of water. Four of her men were killed and six wounded and the vessel was badly damaged. This was on April 14, 1865. The navy never gives up one of its vessels as a total loss till everything has been done to prove that to be the case; by July 7th the Sciota had been raised, repaired, and sent around to Pensacola for her armament, with orders to proceed to New York and go into dry-dock. In the picture the man leaning against the bulwark, with one hand on his coat and the other in his trousers' pocket, is John S. Pearce, one of the engineers of the famous Kearsarge. In Farragut's squadron below New
1 2 3 4 5