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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 7 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 6 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 4 4 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 1 1 Browse Search
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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 4 (search)
III. a race with the enemy (April 3-22, 1865) explanatory note.-There is hardly anything in this chapter but will easily explain itself. The war was virtually over when we left our sister, though we did not know it, and the various raids and forays alluded to in the journal were really nothing but the march of victorious generals to take possession of a conquered country. Communication was so interrupted that we did not hear of the fall of Richmond till the 6th of April, four days after it happened, and no certain news of Lee's surrender reached us till the 20th, eleven days after the event, though we caught vague rumors of it on the 19th. Chunnennuggee Ridge, to which allusion is made in this chapter and the preceding, is a name given to a tall escarpment many miles in length, overlooking the rich prairie lands of South-East Alabama. On top of this bluff the owners of the great cotton plantations in the prairie made their homes, and for some five or six miles north of th
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 62: leaving Charlotte.—The rumors of surrender. (search)
ter was received, and a despatch announcing General Lee's surrender. Augusta, April 21, 1865. Madame: Herewith I send despatch just received, and which I hope will reach you promptly. I send you copy of despatch announcing the suspension of arms. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, A. D. Fry. A specimen of wild rumors is appended to show the cloud that covered us with thick darkness. Cokesbury Depot, Saturday Afternoon, 2.30 o'clock P. M., April 22, 1865. Mrs. Davis. Madame: I have the honor, in compliance with my offer, to write from this place. I presume you heard the rumors of yesterday, viz., that an armistice of sixty days had been agreed upon, and General Grant had sent couriers to the different raiding parties to that effect; that commissioners to negotiate terms had been appointed, consisting on our part of Generals Lee, Johnston, and Beauregard, and on the part of the Yankees of Grant, Sherman, and Thomas; also that the Fre
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 19: events in the Mississippi Valley.--the Indians. (search)
volt on the following day April 16, 1861. by saying, editorially, Nobody expected any other response from him. They may not approve of the early course of the Southern States, but they denounce and defy the action of Mr. Lincoln in proposing to call out seventy-five thousand men for the purpose of coercing the seceded States of the Union. Whatever else may happen, he gets no men from the Border States to carry on such a war. Jackson followed up this revolutionary movement by calling April 22, 1865. the Legislature to assemble in extraordinary session at Jefferson City on the 2d day of May, for the purpose, he said, of enacting such laws and adopting such measures as may be deemed necessary and proper for the more perfect organization and equipment of the militia of this State, and to raise the money and such other means as may be required to place the State in a proper attitude for defense. The Governor was acting under. the inspiration of a disloyal graduate of the Military Aca
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 59: (search)
ahatchie. Schooner Cora Smyser 6,877 92 1,073 12 5,864 80 do April 22, 1865 Sciota.   Cotton, 60 bales and 2 bags     12,655 66 do Feb. Dinsmore. Sloop Josephine 1,826 77 333 97 1,492 80 Key West April 22, 1865 Sunflower. Schooner Joseph H. Toone 15,606 48 3,490 44 12,11et. Schooner Lowood 34,555 03 5,948 70 28,606 33 New Orleans April 22, 1865 Chocura. Steamer Laura 36,052 92 1,589 90 34,463 02 Key West April 22, 1865 Stars and Stripes, Hendrick Hudson. Sloop Lydia 1,302 17 224 76 1,077 41 do April 22, 1865 Beauregard. Schooner Lily 1,1April 22, 1865 Beauregard. Schooner Lily 1,102 00 625 04 476 96 New Orleans June 2, 1865 Metacomet. Sloop Last Resort 1,987 58 290 15 1,697 43 Key West Aug. 25, 1865 Roebuck. Sloopdona. Schooner Mary Ann 2,971 81 837 99 2,133 82 New Orleans April 22, 1865 Itasca. Sloop Mary Ellen 3,875 35 444 82 3,430 53 Key West A Schooner Pancha Larissa 8,980 85 1,225 00 7,755 85 New Orleans April 22, 1865 Sciota. Sloop Pickwick 335 85 102 70 233 15 Key West Aug. 25
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
communicate with the latter through rebel sources, and General Wilson was necessarily confused by the conflict of orders and information. I deemed it of the utmost importance to establish for him a more reliable base of information and supply, and accordingly resolved to go in person to Savannah for that purpose. But, before starting, I received a New York Times, of April 2-4th, containing the following extraordinary communications: [First Bulletin.] War Department, Washington, April 22, 1865. Yesterday evening a bearer of dispatches arrived from General Sherman. An agreement for a suspension of hostilities, and a memorandum of what is called a basis for peace, had been entered into on the 18th inst. by General Sherman, with the rebel General Johnston. Brigadier-General Breckenridge was present at the conference. A cabinet meeting was held at eight o'clock in the evening, at which the action of General Sherman was disapproved by the President, by the Secretary of War,
e; but the Fifth corps crowding along the line without waiting to re-form, captured all who remained, as it swept along. I was with the extreme advance in the last movement, and was relieved while there at seven P. M., the battle being then over, and not even a fugitive enemy in sight. The following are copies of the letters herein referred to. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. K. Warren,, Major-General Volunteers. General Warren to Col. Bowers. Petersburg, April 22, 1865. To Colonel T. S. Bowers, A. G., Headquarters Armies of United States: Colonel: I beg leave to forward a copy of communication addressed to Headquarters Armies United States, on the ninth instant, with the request to be allowed to publish the same. This will relieve me and my friends from an unpleasant relation to the public, will answer many letters daily received, and will prevent my silence being an injury to me. I can then patiently await the investigation that I do not doubt wil
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
U. S. transport steamer Thorne blown up by a torpedo in Cape Fear River. March 28-29, 1865. U. S. monitors Milwaukee and Osage sunk by torpedoes in Mobile Bay. April, 1865. April 8, 1865. Spanish Fort, Mobile, bombarded. The Confederates evacuate at night. April 12, 1865. Mobile occupied by Union forces. April 14, 1865. Anniversary of the capture of Fort Sumter celebrated, by imposing ceremonies at the fort, and replacing the flag by Gen. Anderson. April 22, 1865. Mississippi Squadron flagship Black Hawk burnt at Mound City. April 24, 1865. Confed. ram Webb escapes past the Union fleet on the Red River; is run ashore below New Orleans, deserted, and blown up. May, 1865. May 4, 1865. Surrender by Corn. E. Farrand, C. S. N., of vessels under his command to Acting Rear-Adml. Thatcher, commanding West Gulf Squadron, agreed upon. May 19, 1865. Surrender of the Confed. ram Stonewall to Spanish authorities in Cuba. M
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 17: (search)
mand and those of General Halleck at the time, and the pointed phraseology of General Halleck's dispatch to Mr. Stanton, wherein he reports that he had ordered his generals to pay no heed to my orders within the clearly defined area of my own command. I am, etc., W. T. Sherman, Major-General commanding. The movements of General Halleck, of which General Sherman thus pointedly complained, were made in pursuance of the following order from General Grant: Fortress Monroe, April 22, 1865. Major-General Halleck, Richmond, Va. The truce entered into by Sherman will be ended as soon as I can reach Raleigh. Move Sheridan with his cavalry toward Greensboro, North Carolina, as soon as possible. I think it will be well to send one corps of infantry also, the whole under Sheridan. The infantry need not go further than Danville, unless they receive orders hereafter to do so. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. General Sherman's report and the subsequent correspondence
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 18: (search)
ow both interesting and pertinent to the questions General Sherman has raised, is as follows: Views of Postmaster-General Reagan: Charlotte, N. C., April 22, 1865. To the President. Sir—In obedience to your request for the opinions in writing of the members of the Cabinet on the questions: first, as to whether you members of the Davis Cabinet, submitted in writing at the same time, were as follows: Views of Mr. Benjamin, Secretary of State: Charlotte, N. C., 22d April, 1865. To the President. Sir: I have the honor to submit this paper as the advice in writing which you requested from the heads of the departments of the Governeration. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, S. R. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy. Views of Attorney-General Davis: Charlotte, N. C., 22d April, 1865. To the President. Sir: The questions submitted by you to the members of your Cabinet for their opinions are: 1. Whether the convention agreed upon on
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McKean, William Wister 1800- (search)
McKean, William Wister 1800- Naval officer; born in Huntingdon county, Pa., Sept. 19, 1800; was a son of Judge Joseph Borden McKean and nephew of Gov. Thomas McKean. He entered the navy as midshipman in 1814; became a lieutenant in 1825, a commander in 1841, captain in 1855, and commodore in July, 1862, when he was retired. In command of a schooner, under Commodore Porter, he assisted that officer (1823-24) in suppressing piracy in the West Indies. In 1860 he was engaged in the special service of conveying the Japanese embassy home. He was governor of the Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, in 1858-61, and was for a short time after his return from Japan in command of the Western Gulf blockading squadron. He died near Binghamton, N. Y., April 22, 1865.
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