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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 21 21 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 13 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 9 9 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 9, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From Gettysburg to the coming of Grant. (search)
proved it. It was, 1. the Shebang, quarters of the United States Sanitary commission. the object of the Sanitary commission was to alleviate the hardships of soldier life, to afford physical comfort to the sick and wounded, and supply such of the well as were needy with suitable underclothing, etc. The funds of the commission were raised by means of Sanitary fairs in the principal cities, and by voluntary subscription. The report of the treasurer shows that from June 27th, 1861, to July 1st, 1865, the receipts were $4,813,750.64, and the disbursements $4,530,774.95.--editors. 2. General Post-Office, Army of Potomac, December, 1863, at Brandy Station. in the Army of the Potomac each regiment had a Post-boy, who carried the letters of his command to brigade headquarters. There the mails of the different regiments were placed in one pouch and sent up to division headquarters, and thence to corps headquarters, where mail agents received them and delivered them, at the principal d
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 22: prisoners.-benevolent operations during the War.--readjustment of National affairs.--conclusion. (search)
ospital, in June, 1862, until this time, or two years and a half, about 16,000 patients have been treated here, of whom, only two hundred have died. The Ladies' Union Relief Association of Baltimore are assiduous in their attentions to the patients in this hospital. Four or five of their members are here every day to assist, especially in the cooking department. The report of the Surgeon-General, Joseph K. Barnes, at the close of the war, showed that, from the beginning, in 1861, to July 1, 1865, there had been treated, in the general hospitals alone, 1,057,423 cases, among whom the rate of mortality was only eight per cent. That rate varied in different portions of our widely extended country; the central, or the region of the Mississippi basin, being much the larger. The rate was much smaller than had ever been known before. The annual mortality of the United States army, in the Mexican war, from diseases, was over ten per cent. That of the British army, in the Crimean war, w
tenant-Colonel Lockwood had their horses killed under them, and three color bearers were killed. Its casualties at Gettysburg were 5 killed, 41 wounded, and 1 missing. It renlisted and returned to Wheeling on its veteran furlough in February, 1864, taking the field again in May, 1864, in Carroll's (3d) Brigade, Gibbon's (2d) Division, Second Corps. Subsequently, this brigade was commanded by General Thomas A. Smyth, and the division by General William Hays. The Seventh was mustered out July 1, 1865, having served with credit to itself and honor to its State. Fifth Ohio Infantry. Candy's Brigade — Geary's Division--Twelfth Corps. (1) Col Samuel H. Dunning. (2) Col. John H. Patrick (Killed). (3) Col. Robert Kirkup. companies. killed and died of wounds. died of disease, accidents, in Prison, &c. Total Enrollment. Officers. Men. Total. Officers. Men. Total. Field and Staff 3 1 4 1   1 16 Company A   15 15   7 7 228   B 1 7 8   3 3 181   C 1 15 16
liged to resign his position, after over three years service, on account of necessary absence from the city. Those who have listened to the simple, truthful testimony which the statistics afford of the benefit and relief which the generous and loyal offerings of our people have enabled the association to dispense to our sick and wounded soldiers, will join me in surprise at the comparative small sum which it has cost through the economy and system which has marked its management. On July 1, 1865, at which time the books and accounts of the association were transferred to my hands, there was in bank a balance of$3,969 29 Donations from that time to the close of the association1,350 00 Amount advanced by Treasurer130 06    $5,449 35 The expenditures for the same period, to wit, for the months of June, July, August, and September, have been for rent, salaries, and current expenses$5,449 35 Thus closing my account for moneys received. This statement does not include a nu
treat of General Pope, the railroads under Lifting the 59,000-pound engine Vibbard from the draw of long Bridge This scene of March, 1864, suggests some of the difficulties which confronted the superintendent of military railroads during the war. Long Bridge, from the railroad-man's viewpoint, was not a very substantial structure. J. J. Moore, chief engineer and general superintendent of military railroads of Virginia, reported to Brigadier-General D. C. McCallum, under the date of July 1, 1865, that he experienced great difficulty in keeping it secure for the passage of trains. On August 22, 1864, the draw at the south end of the bridge was nearly destroyed by a tug, with a schooner in tow, running into it, and February 18, 1865, an engine broke through the south span of the bridge, the entire span being wrecked. The rescue of the Vibbard, which weighed 59,000 pounds and cost $11,845, was apparently effectual; the same report states that it ran 5,709 miles at a total cost of
n; it was below the level of the Chemung River, and a lagoon of stagnant water caused much sickness. The severity of the winter also brought much suffering to the prisoners, may of whom came from the warm Gulf States. The number of deaths to July 1, 1865, was 2,917; the number of escapes 17; those in the hospital, July 1, 1865, 218; and the number released, 8,970; total, 12,122. These figures were taken from the books of the officer in charge. The high fence was built when prisoners were ordJuly 1, 1865, 218; and the number released, 8,970; total, 12,122. These figures were taken from the books of the officer in charge. The high fence was built when prisoners were ordered to this point. The only photograph showing the whole of Elmira prison camp The only photograph showing the whole of Elmira prison camp of oilcloth, coats, and blankets stretched upon sticks. The tents and huts were not arranged according to any order, and there was in most parts of the enclosure scarcely room for two men to walk abreast between the tents and huts. . . . Masses of corn bread, bones, old rags, and filth of every description were scattered around or accumulated in l
nd many other things. The standard set by the branch for the local-aid societies was a box a month for the soldiers. Quarters of the Sanitary Commission. Besides the active work at the front, departments or special bureaus were established at Washington, New York, Louisville, New Orleans, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Annapolis, and City Point, in addition to West Virginia, Texas, and the South. The report of the treasurer of the Sanitary Commission shows that from June 27, 1861, to July 1, 1865, the receipts from the Sanitary fairs in the principal cities were $4,813,750.64, and the disbursements $4,530,774.95, leaving a balance in the hands of the Commission of $282,975.69. Quarters of the immense sanitary commission organization Brandy Station, Virginia, in 1863 Quarters of the immense sanitary commission organization at Brandy Station were known as the shebang At first, there was much difficulty in establishing the principle of universality of relief. A community wa
ong roll on his drum, is Newton Peters. He enlisted at fifteen, in the fall of 1861, and served throughout the four years, not being mustered out until June 29, 1865. The boy standing in the front line at his left is Samuel Scott, aged sixteen when he entered the army as a drummer in August of 1862. He, too, was faithful to the end, receiving his discharge on June 1, 1865. The leader, standing forward with staff in his right hand, is Patrick Yard, who served from November 14, 1861, to July 1, 1865, having been principal musician or drum-major from July 1, 1862. These are only a few of the forty thousand boy musicians who succeeded in securing enlistment in the Union armies, and followed the flag. vedettes—the widely dispersed army of Lee had been undergoing a great religious revival, until they entered upon their final and fateful campaign with fervent hope and prayer and self-devotion. Along the north bank, the spirit of the Union host, as compared with the lightsome heart of
,275 three years men. Missouri 109,111 equal to 86,530 three years men. Tennessee 31,092 equal to 26,394 three years men. —————— Total 262,601 225,031 The public debt of the government of the United States on July 1, 1861, and on July 1, 1865, was as follows: Debt, July 1, 1861 $90,867,828.68 Debt, July 1, 1865 2,682,593,026.53 ———————— Increase in four years $2,591,725,197.85 Of the manner in which our adversaries conducted the war I had frequent occasion to remark. ThJuly 1, 1865 2,682,593,026.53 ———————— Increase in four years $2,591,725,197.85 Of the manner in which our adversaries conducted the war I had frequent occasion to remark. Those observations made at the time present a more correct representation of facts than could be given in more recent statements. In a message to Congress on August 15, 1862, I said: The perfidy which disregarded rights secured by compact, the madness which trampled on obligations made sacred by every consideration of honor, have been intensified by the malignancy engendered by defeat. These passions have changed the character of the hostilities waged by
Joseph C. Abbott Bvt. Brigadier GeneralApr. 1, 1865, to July 1, 1865. Abbott's detached Brigade, Tenth Army Corps, Department of North Carolina. Bvt. Brigadier GeneralMarch 27, 1865, to Apr. 1, 1865. 2d Brigade, 1st Division, Tenth Army Corps, Department of North Carolina. Col. 7th N. H. InfantryJan. 1, 1865, to Jan. 6, 1865. 2d Brigade, 1st Division, Twenty-Fourth Army Corps, Army of the James Col. 7th N. H. InfantryJan. 6, 1865, to March 27, 1865. 2d Brigade, 1st Division, 24th Corps., Terry's Provisional Corps, Department of North Carolina. Col. 7th N. H. InfantryNov. 4, 1864, to Nov. 18, 1864. 2d Brigade, 1st Division, Tenth Army Corps, Army of the James Col. 7th N. H. InfantryOct. 20, 1864, to Oct. 29, 1864. 2d Brigade, 1st Division, Tenth Army Corps, Army of the James Col. 7th N. H. InfantrySept. 12, 1864, to Oct. 12, 1864. 2d Brigade, 1st Division, Tenth Army Corps, Army of the
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