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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
entire accuracy. These men — Andrew, Greeley, Smith and Wilson — have each passed from this life. The history of their efforts to bring all parts of our common country once more and abidingly into unity, peace and concord, and of Mr. Greeley's enormous sacrifice to compel justice to be done to one man, and he an enemy, should be written. I will add a single incident tending the same way. In a consultation with Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, at his residence on Capitol Hill, at Washington, in May, 1866, he related to me how the chief of this Military Bureau showed him the evidence upon which the proclamation was issued charging Davis and Clay with complicity in the assassination of Mr. Lincoln. He said that he refused to give the thing any support, and that he told that gentleman the evidence was insufficient in itself, and incredible. I am not likely ever to forget the earnest manner in which Mr. Stevens then said to me: Those men are no friends of mine. They are public enemies; and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Washington on the Eve of the War. (search)
ow is the feeling in the District of Columbia? What proportion of the population would sustain the Government by force, if necessary? It is my belief, General, I replied, that two-thirds of Winfield Scott, Brevet Lieutenant-General, U. S. A. (from a photograph.) General Scott was General-in-Chief of the army until November 1, 1861, when he was placed upon the retired list on his own application, and was succeeded by Major-General George B. McClellan. He died at West Point in May, 1866, in his eightieth year. the fighting stock of this population would sustain the Government in defending itself, if called upon. But they are uncertain as to what can be done or what the Government desires to have done, and they have no rallying-point. The general walked the room again in silence. The carriage came to the door, and I accompanied him toward it. As he was leaving, he turned suddenly, looked me in the face, placed his hand on my shoulder, and said: These people have
re to become isolated from his own country, he also declined that position, expecting to again return to the profession of the law. During the winter he was called to Washington to attend to some business affairs of his own and of some friends. He went thither, therefore, and while waiting for the settlement of these matters with the government he became much interested in the reconstruction and readjustment of national questions then under discussion. At the State convention held in May, 1866, he was nominated by acclamation for Congressman-at-large, the State being entitled to an additional member who was chosen at large until the legislature assembled to redistrict the State. He could not well refuse to accept, notwithstanding the fact that he had not intended to again enter politics. His majority was overwhelming. March 4, 1867, he again took his seat as a member of Congress, after an absence of six years, having resigned his seat to enter the army in August, 1861. Bring
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 43: visit to New Orleans and admission to Fortress Monroe. (search)
avis has always since felt the most sincere gratitude and affection. Want of space has forced me unwillingly, in his case as in that of many others, to condense their statements, but I quote them as they are, only changing a few words. In May, 1866, an indictment was procured against the ex-chieftain, in the United States District Court of Virginia, held in Richmond. On June I Ith, of the same year, on motion of Mr. Boutwell, the House of Representatives, by a vote of 105 yeas to 19 naysilt signed the bond through Mr. Horace F. Clark, his son-in-law, and Mr. Augustus Schell, his friend. Mr. Greeley's enormous sacrifice to compel justice to be done to one man, and he an enemy, should be written. Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, in May, 1866, related to me how the Chief of this Military Bureau showed him the evidence upon which the proclamation was issued charging Messrs. Davis and Clay with complicity in the assassination of Mr. Lincoln. He said he refused to give the thing sup
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 1: effect of the battle of Bull's Run.--reorganization of the Army of the Potomac.--Congress, and the council of the conspirators.--East Tennessee. (search)
s and guards, and threats of being hung. Nor were these threats idle; for, from time to time, prisoners' were taken out and hung — men as innocent of crime as The County jail at Knoxwile this picture is from a sketch made by the author in May, 1866, and shows the front of the prison. The window that lighted the room on the lower floor, in which Brownlow was confined, is seen on the right of the door. In the upper story are two immense iron cages, into which the worst criminals are put, ond, that I am a bad man, and dangerous to the Confederacy, and that you ports, and I will do for your Confederacy more than the devil has ever done — I will quit the country! The Gallows-tree. this is from a sketch made by the author, in May, 1866. the tree was a vigorous red oak, standing on a slope overlooking the town, a few rods northeastward of the Greenville Station. Some person commenced cutting it down a while after the execution, but was restrained by the consideration offered
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 8: the siege and capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
field of victory. All of that keen wintry night his wearied troops were busy in ministering to the wants of the wounded, and in burying the many Illinois The graves of the Illinois troops. this is from a sketch made by the author early in May, 1866. this burial-place, surrounded by a rude wattling fence, was in Hysmith's old field, in the edge of a wood, near where McArthur's troops were posted. The trees and shrubbery in the adjoining wood showed hundreds of marks of the severe battle.ch so often seduce the less favored soldier to desert; while courage and patriotism were continually stimulated by heroic words from patient and loving ones at home. The writer visited the theater of events recorded in this chapter, early in May, 1866. He left Nashville in the steamer Tyrone, toward the evening of the 5th. Most of his fellow-passengers, as far as Clarksville, sixty miles down the Cumberland River, consisted of about two hundred colored soldiers, who had just been paid off
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 10: General Mitchel's invasion of Alabama.--the battles of Shiloh. (search)
teen Months in the Rebel Army, by an impressed New Yorker. From that point they went across the country in a southwesterly direction, to form a junction with the forces of Beauregard at Corinth. This was effected on the 1st of April, and the united armies lay upon the line of the Mobile and Ohio railway Fort Negley. this is a view of the front of Fort Negley, or the face toward the country, commanding the southern approaches to Nashville, as it appeared when sketched by the author in May, 1866 from Corinth south to Bethel, and on the Memphis and Charleston railway, from Corinth east to Iuka. They were joined by several regiments from Louisiana; two divisions from Columbus, under General Polk; and a fine Pensacola, commanded by General Bragg. In numbers, in discipline, in the galaxy of the distinguished names of its commanders, and in every article of merit and display, the Confederate army in the vicinity of Corinth was one of the most magnificent ever assembled by the South o
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
Scott. Eight of their companions afterward escaped from confinement, and six were exchanged as prisoners of war in March, 1863. To each of the survivors of that raid, the Secretary of War afterward presented a medal of honor. This medal was precisely like that presented to naval heroes. Instead of an anchor at the connective between the medal and the ribbon, there was an eagle surmounting crossed cannon, and some balls. When the writer visited tie National cemetery at Chattanooga, in May, 1866, he saw, in the cave that forms the receiving vault, This cave and the National cemetery will be considered hereafter. seven coffins, containing the remains of the seven young men who were hanged at Atlanta, and which had lately been brought from that city for re-interment. For a minute account of the daring adventures of Andrews and his party of young soldiers, see a well-written volume from the pen of one of them (Lieutenant William Pettinger, of the Second Ohio), entitled, Daring
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
yal, of about a thousand men, under Colonel Kenly. These were composed of two companies each of the Twenty-seve Pennsylvania and Fifth New York cavalry, one company of Captain Mapes's Pioneers, and a section of Knapp's battery. Kenly was charged with the protection of the road and bridges between Front Royal and Strasburg. One company each of the Second Massachusetts, Third Wisconsin, and Twenty-seventh Indiana were posted along that road. When the writer was at Nashville, early in May, 1866, he was permitted by General Ewell, then residing there, to peruse and make extracts from the manuscript records of his brigade, kept by his young adjutant. In it was the statement, that when Ewell's force was near Front Royal, a young woman was seen running toward them. She had made a circuit to avoid the Yankees, and she sent word to General Jackson, by officers who went to meet her, to push on — only one regiment in the town, and that might be completely surprised; if we pressed on we
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
when the writer sketched it, at the close of May, 1866. The two great armies were now in closewhen the writer sketched it, at the close of May, 1866. the Confederates were posted on the hills,the writer visited the spot, at the close of May, 1866. six miles from Richmond; The advance to when the writer sketched it, at the close of May, 1866. in the foreground, on the right, is seen awhen the writer sketched it, at the close of May, 1866. the Chickahominy was then up, and overflowhe writer sketched the spot, at the close of May, 1866. the one in the foreground was a flouring-mwhen the writer sketched it, at the close of May, 1866. in the foreground is seen the cellar and fwhen the writer sketched it, at the close of May, 1866. it is a few rods from the scene of the hot the writer made the sketch, at the close of May, 1866. Lee ordered another assault on the tiernts recorded in this chapter at the close of May, 1866. After a delightful railway-journey of abou[1 more...]
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