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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 918 918 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 332 332 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 96 96 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 47 47 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 44 44 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 33 33 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 30 30 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 22 22 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 21 21 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1867 AD or search for 1867 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Charles Kendall, 1835- (search)
Adams, Charles Kendall, 1835- Educator and historian; born in Derby, Vt., Jan. 24, 1835; was graduated at the University of Michigan. and continued his studies in Germany, France, and Italy. In 1867-85 he was Professor of History in the University of Michigan; in 1885-92 was president of Cornell University; in 1892 became president of the University of Wisconsin; and from that year till 1895 was editor-in-chief of the revised edition of Johnson's Universal Cyclopaedia. He has published many monographs and papers in reviews, and Democracy and monarchy in France; Manual of Historical Literature; British orations; Christopher Columbus, his life and work, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agassiz, Louis John Rudolph, 1807-1873 (search)
entific investigations. Professor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. with some of his pupils, a scientific exploration of the shores of Lake Superior. He afterwards explored the southern coasts of the United States, of Brazil, and the waters of the Pacific Ocean. An account of his explorations on the Brazilian coast was given in A journey to Brazil, by Mrs. Agassiz, in 1867. He received the Copley Medal from the Royal Society of London; from the Aeademy of Sciences of Paris, the Monthyon Prize and the Cuvier Prize; the Wollaston Medal from the Geological Society of London; and the Medal of Merit from the King of Prussia. He was a member of many scientific societies, and the universities of Dublin and Ediniburgh conferred on him the honorary degree of Ll.D. Professor Agassiz published valuable scientific works in Europe and in the United States. He died in Ca
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama. (search)
nment was removed to Richmond. At the close of the war a provisional governor for Alabama was appointed (June 21. 1865), and in September a convention re-ordained the civil and criminal laws, excepting such as related to slavery: declared the Ordinance of Secession and the State war-debt null; passed an ordinance against slavery: and provided for an election of State officers, who were chosen in November. The government thus constituted remained in force until superseded by military rule in 1867. In November of that year a convention formed a new constitution for the State, which was ratified Feb. 4, 1868. State officers and members of Congress having been duly chosen, and all requirements complied with, Alabama became entitled to representation in Congress; and on July 14, 1868, the military relinquished to the civil authorities all legal control. The Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the national Constitution were ratified by Alabama, the latter Nov. 16, 1870. Population i
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alaska, (search)
e Emperor Paul in 1799. It was invested with the exclusive right of hunting and fishing in the American waters of the Czar. The charter of the company expired in 1867, when the government declined to renew it. In 1865-67 the country was explored by a scientific corps sent out by the United States to select a route for the Russo-American telegraph line — a project which was abandoned in consequence of the successful laying of the Atlantic cable. Early in 1867 negotiations were begun for the purchase of the Territory by the United States, and a treaty to that effect was ratified by the United States Senate May 20 the same year. The price paid was $7.200,popular one, but it was then believed that the Teslin route would prove the most advantageous in the future. Governors of the Territory. Military Governor. Gen. Lovell H. Rousseau1867-- Civil Governors. John H. Kinkead1884-85 Alfred P. Swineford1885-89 Lyman E. Knapp1889-93 James Sheakley1893-97 John G. Brady1897-1901
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alaskan boundary, the. (search)
to Great Britain and Russia to divide the territory north of lat. 54° 40″ N., and to the United States and Great Britain to divide that to the south. Great Britain and Russia settled their maritime and territorial differences by a convention signed at St. Petersburg on Feb. 28, 1825. which will hereafter be referred to as the convention of 1825. This convention defines, in Articles III. and IV., the boundary between Alaska and the British possessions as it exists to-day. The treaty of 1867, ceding Alaska to the United States, describes the eastern limits of the cession by incorporating the definition given in the convention of 1825. This convention was signed only in French, which is therefore the official text; but there accompanies it, in the British publications. an English translation, which in the main fairly reproduces the original. These texts, so far as they relate to the boundary, are as follows: III. La ligne de demarcation entre les Possessions des Hautes Part
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alvey, Richard Henry, 1826- (search)
826- Jurist; born in St. Mary's county, Md., in March. 1826; was educated in St. Mary's College: admitted to the bar in 1849. He was elected a Pierce Presidential elector in 1852, and a member of the Michigan State Constitutional Convention in 1867. He served as chief judge of the Fourth Judicial Circuit, and as a justice of the Michigan Court of Appeals in 1867-83, and as chief-justice of that court in 1883-93. On Jan. 1, 1896. President Cleveland appointed him a member of the Venezuelan ., in March. 1826; was educated in St. Mary's College: admitted to the bar in 1849. He was elected a Pierce Presidential elector in 1852, and a member of the Michigan State Constitutional Convention in 1867. He served as chief judge of the Fourth Judicial Circuit, and as a justice of the Michigan Court of Appeals in 1867-83, and as chief-justice of that court in 1883-93. On Jan. 1, 1896. President Cleveland appointed him a member of the Venezuelan Boundary Commission (see Venezuela question).
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Andrew, John Albion, 1818-1867 (search)
Andrew, John Albion, 1818-1867 War governor of Massachusetts: was born in Windham, Me., May 31, 1818: was graduated at Bowdoin College in 1837, and became conspicuous as an anti-slavery advocate. He was chosen governor of Massachusetts, in 1860, by the largest popular vote ever cast for any candidate for that office. Foreseeing a conflict with the Confederates, he took means to make the State militia efficient; and, within a week after the President's call for troops, he sent five regiments of infantry, a battalion of riflemen, and a battery of artillery to the assistance of the government. He was active in raising troops during the war and providing for their comfort. An eloquent orator, his voice was very efficacious. He was reelected in 1862, and declined to be a candidate in 1864. He died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 30, 1867.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anthon, Charles, 1797-1867 (search)
Anthon, Charles, 1797-1867 Scholar and educator; born in New York, Nov. 19, 1797. His father, a surgeon-general in the British army, settled in New York soon after the Revolution. Charles graduated at Columbia College in 1815, was admitted to the bar, and in 1820 was made professor of languages in his alma mater. Professor Anthon was the author of many books connected with classical studies. He was made the head of the classical department of the college as successor of Professor Moore in 1835, having served as rector of the grammar-school of the college for five years. Professor Anthon was very methodical in his habits. He retired at ten o'clock and rose at four, and performed much of his appointed day's work before breakfast. By industry he produced about fifty volumes, consisting chiefly of the Latin classics and aids to classical study. All of his works were republished in England. His larger works are a Classical dictionary, and a Dictionary of Greek and Roman antiquitie
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arizona, (search)
. This young goddess was called Arizonia, the name signifying Maiden Queen. This Arizonia dwelt upon the earth a great length of time in lonely solitude, until at a certain time, while basking in the sunbeams, a drop of dew from heaven rested upon arizonia, who in due time blessed the world with twins, a son and a daughter, and these became the father and mother of the Zuni Indians, and from this tribe arose all other races of men, the black, white, olive, and all other clay-colored men being merely apostate offshoots from this original tribe, and the Zunis being the only pure, original stock, children of the sun, now upon the earth. Governors of the Territory.  Term of Office. R. C. McCormick1867-69 A. P. K. Safford1870-77 John P. Hoyt1878 John C. Fremont1879-82 Frederick Tuttle1882-85 C. Meyer Zulick1885-89 Lewis Wolfley1889-91 John N. Irwin1891-92 Nathan O. Murphy1892-94 Lewis C. Hughes1894-96 Benj. J. Franklin1896-97 Myron H. McCord1897-99 Nathan O. Murphy1899--
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arkansas, (search)
il (see Pea Ridge). On Oct. 30, 1863, a meeting of loyal citizens, representing about twenty counties, was held at Fort Smith, to take measures for reorganizing the State government. In January following, a convention, composed of representatives of State seal of Arkansas. forty-two counties, assembled at Little Rock, and framed a loyal constitution, which was ratified by the people in March, 1864. Members of the legislature were elected, and in April a State government was organized. In 1867 military rule was established in Arkansas, which, with Mississippi, constituted a military district. A new constitution was framed by a convention at Little Rock, Jan. 7, 1868, and was ratified by a small majority in March. On June 22, Congress declared Arkansas entitled to representation in that body, and the administration of the government was transferred to the civil authority. Population in 1890, 1,125,385; in 1900, 1,311,564. Territorial Governors of Arkansas.  Term of Office. J
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