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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 267 267 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 92 92 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 52 52 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 43 43 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 31 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 29 29 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 18 18 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for 1871 AD or search for 1871 AD in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 9: Journalist at large.—1868-1876. (search)
the Commonwealth. When, by the passage of a local-option law in 1871, the question of License or No License was submitted to popular voteitman was the Prohibition Robert C. Pitman. Boston Journal, Nov. 4, 1871. candidate in 1871, Mr. Garrison deprecated a movement which could o1871, Mr. Garrison deprecated a movement which could only draw votes from the Republican nominee, who was a firm Prohibitionist, to the advantage of his Democratic and License opponent. In 1876 hlcome the movement, and make it known to the American Ind. Aug. 31, 1871. public, in an article full of burning indignation over the iniquityr, among the partisans of Ind. June 23, Dec. 22, 1870; Apr. 13, 27, 1871. President Grant when the latter, in 1870-71, was bent on annexing S71, was bent on annexing San Domingo to the United States. He both sustained Mr. Sumner's opposition to the measure, and protested against the Senator's consequent removal from Ind. Mar. 16, 1871. the head of the Committee on Foreign Relations. Charles Sumner to W. L. Garrison. Washington, 29th Dec.
hout their patronage or permission (as an organized body), nor allow that slavery went under in any but God's good time and way. My father's standing with the clergy was not improved by his belief in the reality of the so-called spiritual manifestations—i. e., in proofs of the future existence not resting solely on human aspiration or on the Bible. Some hints have already been given of his attitude towards Ante, 3.375. these phenomena, and little need be added here. A letter written in 1871 well portrays it: In reply to your letter, inquiring what are my views of Ms. Jan. 31, 1871, to J. S. Adams. Spiritualism, I will state for your private information that, after long and close investigation of the subject, I have had sufficient evidence, again and again, to convince me that it is more or less practicable for those who have left the body to hold communion with relatives and friends still in the flesh, and to make known their presence by signs and tokens in the shape of w