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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 2 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 2 2 Browse Search
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n. Its influence is felt in every city, town, and village, and it has earned the good — will and support of the entire American people. Among its leaders have been some of the most prominent men of the country. Its commanders-in-chief have been: B. F. Stephenson,Illinois,1866 S. A. Hurlbut,Illinois,1866-67 John A. Logan,Illinois,1868-70 Ambrose E. Burnside,Rhode Island,1871-72 Charles Devens,Massachusetts,1873-74 John F. Hartranft,Pennsylvania,1875-76 John C. Robinson,New York,1877-78 William Earnshaw,Ohio,1879 Louis Wagner,Pennsylvania,1880 George S. Merrill,Massachusetts,1881 Paul Van Dervoort,Nebraska,1882 Robert B. Beath,Pennsylvania,1883 John S. Kountz,Ohio,1884 S. S. Burdett,Dist. of Columbia,1885 Lucius Fairchild,Wisconsin,1886 John P. Rea,Minnesota,1887 William Warner,Missouri,1888 Russell A. Alger,Michigan,1889 Wheelock G. Veazey,Vermont,1890 John Palmer,New York,1891 A. G. Weissert,Wisconsin,1892 John G. B. Adams,Massachusetts,1893 Thomas G. Lawler
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Did General Lee Violate his oath in siding with the Confederacy? (search)
rn journals would not be open to me if I were to make such an attempt. The conquered seldom or never write the accepted histories. The arbitrament of war has settled adversely the question of secession as a peaceful or feasible remedy for wrongs, real or imaginary. In passing judgment upon the personal faith and honor of General Lee and his associates, as affected by secession, the historian or critic or moralist must be careful to view things from the stand-point of 1860 and not that of 1878. The truth is as melancholy as it is undeniable, that whatever theory of States-rights or of constitutional limitations may have been maintainable in 1860, the practice and the accepted theory of late years make the constitution a rope of sand, consolidation a political fact and the general government an irresponsible centralism. The amendments to the constitution since 1860 are to be excluded in all debates about the character of our Federal system prior to the war. Codes of military e
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual reunion of the Virginia division, A. N. V. (search)
ion of General B. T. Johnson, seconded by General W. B. Taliaferro, and endorsed by a number of others, Rev. J. William Jones was requested to prepare a volume containing the report of the original organization of the Association and the addresses at the Lee Memorial meeting — the address of Colonel Charles Marshall at the reunion in 1873; Colonel C. S. Venable in 1874; Major John W. Daniel in 1875; Captain W. Gordon McCabe in 1876; Private Leigh Robinson in 1877, and Colonel William Allan in 1878--together with a carefully prepared roster of the Army of Northern Virginia. Mr. Jones signified his willingness to undertake the compilation at once. The report of the Treasurer showed that there had passed through his hands for the relief of our comrades of the Louisiana division who were suffering from the fever plague, $3,270.96, and that other contributions, in money and provisions, sent direct to New Orleans swelled the aggregate contributed by the Virginia division to $4,260.96.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
sity. He gracefully acknowledges his indebtedness to Captain Nash for valuable services in completing the catalogue. Professor Schele gives a vivid and deeply interesting sketch of the origin and early history of the University, and especially of Mr. Jefferson's connection with it. Then follows a list of the Rectors, members of the Board of Visitors, officers of the Board and of the Faculty, and names of the Professors and Assistant Professors from the foundation of the University down to 1878. Next we have the catalogue of students during that period, with a brief biography of each one--giving date of birth, sessions spent at the University, degrees won and chief events in the after life of each. The volume contains ten thousand names and over a hundred thousand statements of facts. Its compilation was a work of immense labor; and if errors have crept in the wonder is that they are not far more numerous and important. The get up of the volume, in type, paper and binding, is al
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society. (search)
Geo. W . Gary$1,465 55 W. E. Simons & Brother532 02    $1,997 57   This debt, we repeat, has lapped over from previous years, and may be fully accounted for by the statement that in the years 1876 and 1877 we paid for the single items of stereotyping, printing the Confederate roster, and the extra cost of the large number of pages and extra copies of our Papers, the sum of $4,505.86--i. e., if we had run the Papers for 1876 and 1877 on the basis of the cost of publishing them in 1878 and 1879, we would have paid every dollar of our liabilities and had a surplus of $2,508.29. It should be remembered, too, that out of our receipts from the Papers we have had to meet not only the cost of their publication, but all of the expenses of the Society as well, and that we now have on hand back volumes worth at least $5,500 (every one of which can be disposed of in the course of time), and stereotypeplates for nearly the whole of the first year, from which we can reprint ad libit
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
of 348 pages, and contains: 1. A report of the great Lee Memorial Meeting in Richmond in November, 1870, with the splendid orations delivered on the occasion by President Davis and others. 2. Reports of the annual reunions of the Virginia Division Army of Northern Virginia, together with the addresses of Colonel C. S. Venable in 1873; Colonel Charles Marshall in 1874; Major John W. Daniel in 1875; Captain W. Gordon McCabe in 1876; Leigh Robinson, Esq., in 1877; Colonel William Allan in 1878; and General Fitzhugh Lee in 1879. 3. A carefully-prepared Roster of the Army of Northern Virginia. 4. A statement of the Relative Numbers of the Army of Northern Virginia and the Army of the Potomac at their principal battles. As to how the compiler has done his work we may not speak; but we may say that these splendid addresses should find a place in every library. The publishers have done their part of the work in really superb style. The printing (executed by our printer, Mr.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hardee and the Military operations around Atlanta. (search)
fought behind entrenchments all the time, the Confederate loss had necessarily been much greater than ours . . . . The position taken up accidentally by the Sixteenth corps prevented the full force of the blow from falling where it was intended to fall. I have before me a map of The battle of Atlanta, as this action is called by Federal writers, prepared by General Hicken-looper (McPherson's Chief of Artillery) and attached to the proceedings of The army of the Tennessee (Federal) for 1878. This map gives the position of their forces on the 22d of July, and among other things shows that the Fifteenth corps, fronting Atlanta, extended two division lengths south of the Decatur road, and the Seventeenth corps, on the left of the Fifteenth, extended south over and beyond the McDonough road. General McPherson was killed early in the action by the skirmishers of Cleburne's division as it advanced. The spot where he fell is marked on the map, and it is some half a mile directly in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The concentration before Shiloh-reply to Captain Polk. (search)
ttle of Shiloh--as Johnston's own frequent mention of the conduct of my troops — without honoring, by customary courtesy, my name, as their commander, clearly shows! On one occasion, subsequent, General Bragg declared, publicly, in my presence, that these troops of my division, and his troops from Pensacola, Withers's division, which I had in part disciplined, were distinguished as among the few troops who maintained their organization through the battle of Shiloh. I renew my statement of 1878, that of the chaffering and controversy I know nothing now, nor did I know anything then, and in no manner was I a party to it,and that if General Bragg was cognizant of it, he must have rebuked the slander, and defended the conduct of his corps, and stood firm in its vindication. It is therefore apparent that he held me blameless, or that, with his accustomed promptitude, he would have directed me to rise and explain! The question now recurs, Why did Major-General Polk block up the Bark r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.50 (search)
ichardson, the third. Our objects, like those of our brethren in Virginia, are purely benevolent, historical, and non-political. Any man whose record is clear as a soldier in the Army of Northern Virginia is welcome to our ranks, whatever be his present political feeling. We have been very careful to exclude those applicants whose records were not clear to the end of the war. The Army of Tennessee has organized a similar association of the members of that army. During the epidemic of 1878, it will be remembered by most of you, the Army of Northern Virginia cared for its members whenever they were found sick, cared for their families, and buried their dead. But we felt always the necessity for a proper receptacle where we could put our honored braves away. Today we are able to dedicate that tomb and monument. From its outer appearance many persons may not realize the fact that underneath it we can place the bodies of 2,500 men. We have ample room for the remains of our dead
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of the crater, July 30, 1864. (search)
nly gun on the right of the crater that he did not silence. The truth is, it was the only gun on the right that could reach the assaulting columns, and it could not reach them after they entered our works. As to the guns in position on the Jerusalem plank road, in rear of the crater, I have no certain recollection. I remember that a section of Garden's, South Carolina battery, was there a few days before the battle, but whether it was there on the 30th I do not know. I see by the May No., 1878, Southern Historical papers that Captain Flanner's North Carolina battery occupied that position. General Bushrod Johnson's headquarters was upon the Jerusalem plank road, near the cemetery, and is marked in the sketch, General Elliott's and my own near the spring on the covered way, in rear of his brigade. The artillery to the left of Wright's battery, and to the right of the one gun battery on the right of the crater, may have thrown a few shot into the enemy's lines in their front, but
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