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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 2 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 2 2 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.23 (search)
he other side. The table is well furnished with writing-paper, ink, pens, and pencils. Three years and a quarter had passed since I was in the room, where I had been fifty times before, probably; nothing had changed except ourselves. The King's beautiful brown beard had, in the interval, become grey from ear to ear; while my hair, which had been iron-grey, was now as white as Snowdon in winter. I made a smiling reference to the changes Time had wrought in us since we had first met in June, 1878, and discussed the possibilities of introducing civilisation on the Congo. The King began by saying that my visit to Brussels was sure to be followed by great results. He was very certain of being able to get the Congo Railway started now; for the Belgian people were thoroughly roused up, and were even enthusiastic. He said my letters from Africa and my present visit had caused this change. My description of the Forest had fired their imagination; and the people seemed to be about as
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Correction of Dr. McKim's paper. (search)
A Correction of Dr. McKim's paper. By Colonel J. R. Winston. It seems almost impossible to get the facts of battles. Writers of the very highest standing make different statements about the same transaction. Rev. Dr. McKim, in sketch of Steuart's brigade on third day at Gettysburg, says (Southern Historical Society Papers, June, 1878, pages 298-9): Daniel's brigade remained in the breastworks during and after the charge, and neither from that command nor from any other had we any support. Now, I know that Daniel's brigade went into the fight on General Steuart's line; as we went in I passed General Steuart, and as I came out (badly wounded) I again passed him. Hestopped me and talked with me about my wounds. A portion of Daniel's brigade — some of the Forty-fifth North Carolina regiment--never did get behind breastworks, although they were exposed to two lines of works of the enemy. I can bear fullest testimony to the gallantry of General Steuart and his brave regiments of V
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee to the rear. (search)
e. [In our narrative, in our January, 1880, number, of three occasions on which the men vociferated to General Lee to go to the rear, we promised to give in some future issue the sketch of one of the incidents written at the time by Professor W. W. Smith, then a private in the Forty-ninth Virginia regiment. We have been unable to find the sketch to which we then referred, but are glad to be able to give an extract from a speech made by Professor Smith on Memorial day in Warrenton, Va., June, 1878, in which the incident is eloquently given, if not with the fresh enthusiasm of the boy soldier which characterized the sketch Mr. Smith wrote the day after the bloody struggle at Spotsylvania. We regret that we have not space for the whole speech, but give the extract as follows:] We are met, comrades, to pay a brother's tribute to those who marched shoulder to shoulder with us in the army of Northern Virginia, whose hearts we knew, True as the steel of their tried blades, Heroe
s, and gave him no order whatever except the authority to move. . . . I was so pleased that I left, and got as far as possible from the field before the attack, lest the papers might attribute to me what was due to him.—General Grant to Author, June, 1878. On the 17th of September, Early, with inexcusable folly, still further divided his command. Though weakened already by the loss of Anderson, he marched with two divisions of infantry and a large force of cavalry, to Martinsburg, twenty-twusted with the fullest discretion in the management of all the troops under him. Before that, while they highly appreciated him as a commander to execute, they felt a little nervous about giving him too much discretion.—General Grant to Author, June, 1878. As for his soldiers, they declared, referring to the Democratic desire for compromise, that Sheridan was the bearer of Peace propositions to Jefferson Davis from the North. Grant had returned to City Point on the 19th of September, and on
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
ute, I think. General Hood's statement furnishes information not before given in regard to the time of the arrival on the ground of Longstreet's troops, and renders it very certain that the orders for the attack to begin, were given very early in the morning, if not the night before. (Southern Historical Society Papers, December, 1877, page 269.) Hood got up before sunrise, and he gives several circumstances tending to show that General Lee was anxious to make the attack at once. (Idem, June, 1878, page 280.) At the same time, Early set forth a detailed statement of the conference held after the close of the battle of July 1st; he expressed the opinion that Stuart and Ewell were not responsible for the loss of the field, and reiterated, as his final conclusion, the charge that Longstreet was responsible for the failure, because he was so persistently averse to the attack and so 10th to take the steps necessary to begin it. (Idemn, December, 1877, page 291.) Early's conclusion is ba<
s, and gave him no order whatever except the authority to move. . . . I was so pleased that I left, and got as far as possible from the field before the attack, lest the papers might attribute to me what was due to him.—General Grant to Author, June, 1878. On the 17th of September, Early, with inexcusable folly, still further divided his command. Though weakened already by the loss of Anderson, he marched with two divisions of infantry and a large force of cavalry, to Martinsburg, twenty-twusted with the fullest discretion in the management of all the troops under him. Before that, while they highly appreciated him as a commander to execute, they felt a little nervous about giving him too much discretion.—General Grant to Author, June, 1878. As for his soldiers, they declared, referring to the Democratic desire for compromise, that Sheridan was the bearer of Peace propositions to Jefferson Davis from the North. Grant had returned to City Point on the 19th of September, and on