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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maryland, (search)
slatures of 1874 and 1876 for boundary between Maryland and Virginia report......Jan. 16, 1877 Congress appropriates $25,000 for surveying a route for a ship canal between the Chesapeake and Delaware bays to shorten the distance from Baltimore to the ocean by about 200 miles......1878 State convention of tax-payers held at Baltimore to redress grievances and secure relief from taxation......Aug. 12, 1879 Celebration of the 150th anniversary of the founding of Baltimore......Oct. 10-15, 1880 Henry Lloyd, president of the Senate, succeeds Governor McLane, who is appointed United States minister to France......March 27, 1885 Public library, established by gift of Enoch Pratt in 1882, formally opened in Baltimore......Jan. 4, 1886 Sharp contest in Chester River between the State oyster steamer McLane and a fleet of illegal dredgers; two schooners are run down and sunk and others captured......Dec. 10, 1888 State oyster steamer Helen Baughman fights with the schooner R
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Some war history never published. (search)
e to whom the lives and liberties of their countrymen were speedily entrusted should have been exceptions to the general spirit of the Confederates must equally be the cause of surprise and regret. I trust if the poison is circulated by publication among the records, that you will be able to have the antidote out with it. If the other is not published, please add another to your many kind attentions by returning my own. Very truly your friend, Jefferson Davis. Beauvoir, Miss., 15th Oct. 1880. General Marcus J. Wright: Dear Sir,—Please accept my sincere thanks for your kind letter of the 5th instant, and for your consideration in enclosing to me the copy of a paper the existence of which was unknown to me, and which because of its special reference to myself I am glad to possess. The paper purports to be a statement of a conversation of two hours duration, and to have been prepared from memory, four months after the conversation occurred. The occasion is represented to
Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907, Elizur Wright's work for the Middlesex Fells. (search)
behalf, vested the title of the Fells park in the commonwealth, and the park was to be held under unitary control, the Board of Agriculture acting as a Board of Forestry, in perpetuity for the benefit of the municipalities in which it was situated. It will be seen that, under this plan, there was not the same danger of defeat, or blocking to the wheels of its progress by the greed of owners, as there would have been had the Fells acreage not been wholly secured at the same time. On October 15, 1880, Mr. Wright called together some 200 people, and on Bear Hill in the Stoneham Fells formed a small association to devise plans and to discuss the means of carrying out any one that might be agreed upon. Two plans were sketched, Mr. Wright's and that of Wilson Flagg, who, years before Mr. Wright's discovery, had pleaded the Fells cause and made his own successless appeal to the government in behalf of its salvation as a Forest Conservatory, a wild, natural garden for the indigenous faun
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4., Elizur Wright and the Middlesex Fells. (search)
the Fells park been established under Mr. Wright's plan nothing in the mutability of human affairs could have furnished a surer safeguard to its permanency, or that of its most important benefit, the forest, than the private ownership feature of that part voluntary purchase; but let us hope that enough of the public sentiment and of the woods may be spared, that the former growing yearly stronger on the increasing worth and beauty of the latter may still work to the same good end. On Oct. 15, 1880, Mr. Wright called together some two hundred people, and on Bear Hill formed a small association to devise plans and the measures for carrying them out. Two plans were sketched, Mr. Wright's and that of Wilson Flagg. Mr. Wright's embraced the distinct and yet harmonious purposes of both, and was the one adopted. During the next two months, these able advocates had made such headway that the mass meeting held in the Medford Town Hall on Jan. 1, 1881, was packed with eager listeners and