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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 290 290 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 32 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 19 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 13 13 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 2. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 9 9 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 6 6 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for 1881 AD or search for 1881 AD in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The defense of Fort Fisher. (search)
shell thrown against them in the two bombardments that not a magazine or bomb-proof was injured, and after the land armament, with palisades and torpedoes, had been destroyed, no assault would have been practicable in the presence of Bragg's force, had it been under a competent officer. In Vol. X., p. 346, of the Southern historical Society papers may be found a letter from General Braxton Bragg to his brother, dated Wilmington, five days after the fall of Fort Fisher (first published in 1881); also an article by Colonel Lamb, controverting most of General Bragg's statements. General Bragg says (more emphatically but substantially as in his official report): Two hours before hearing of the certain fall of the fort, I felt as confident as ever man did of successfully defending it. . . . No human power could have prevented the enemy from landing, covered as he was by a fleet of ships carrying 600 heavy guns. Anywhere beyond the range of our heavy guns on the fort our land forc