hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 188 188 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 40 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 29 29 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 23 23 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 19 19 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 15 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 8 8 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1884 AD or search for 1884 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 188 results in 176 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbot, Ezra, 1819-1884 (search)
Abbot, Ezra, 1819-1884 Theologian; born in Jackson, Me., April 28, 1819. He was graduated at Bowdoin College in 1840, became associate librarian at Harvard College in 1856, and from 1872 till his death was Professor of New Testament Literature and Interpretation at the Cambridge Divinity School. He was a member of the American Committee of New Testament Revisers, was one of the editors of the American edition of Smith's Bible dictionary, and published numerous works in Biblical criticism. He was especially distinguished in the line of Greek scholarship. He died in Cambridge, Mass., March 21, 1884.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Charles Francis, 2nd 1835- (search)
Adams, Charles Francis, 2nd 1835- Lawyer and historian; born in Boston, Mass., May 27, 1835; second son of Charles Francis, 1st; was graduated at Harvard College in 1856, and admitted to the bar two years afterwards. During the Civil War he served in the Union army, attaining the rank of brevet brigadier-general. He was appointed a member of the Board of Railway Commissioners of Massachusetts in 1869; and was president of the Union Pacific Railway Company in 1884-91. In 1895 he was elected president of the Massachusetts Historical Society. His publications include, Railroads, their origin and problems; Massachusetts, its historians and its history; Three episodes of Massachusetts history; Life of Charles Francis Adams; Richard Henry Dana, a biography, etc. The double anniversary, 1776 and 1863. On July 4. 1869, he delivered the following historical address at Quincy, Mass.: Six years ago, on this anniversary, we — and not only we who stood upon the scarred and fur
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alaska, (search)
d by the United States Senate May 20 the same year. The price paid was $7.200,000. In October Gen. Lovell H. Rousseau. a commissioner for the purpose, formally took possession of the region. The Territory remained under military government till 1884, when a district government was established and a land office opened. This form of administration proved adequate till the remarkable discoveries of gold in the neighborhood of the Klondike and Yukon rivers, in 1897, attracted thousands of minersifficult than the Chilkoot. The Dalton route, which crosses the Chilkoot Pass, joins the others at Fort Selkirk. Up to that year the Chilkoot route had been the most popular one, but it was then believed that the Teslin route would prove the most advantageous in the future. Governors of the Territory. Military Governor. Gen. Lovell H. Rousseau1867-- Civil Governors. John H. Kinkead1884-85 Alfred P. Swineford1885-89 Lyman E. Knapp1889-93 James Sheakley1893-97 John G. Brady1897-1901
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anderson, Rasmus Bjorn, 1846- (search)
Anderson, Rasmus Bjorn, 1846- Author and diplomatist; born in Albion, Wis., of Norwegian parentage, Jan. 12, 1846; was graduated at the Norwegian Lutheran College in Decorah, Ia., in 1866: was Professor of Scandinavian Languages and Literature at the University of Wisconsin in 1875-84, and United States minister to Denmark in 1885-89. He is author of Norse mythology; Viking tales of the North: America not discovered by Columbus; The younger Edda; First chapter of Norwegian immigration; several works in Norwegian: and also many translations of Norse writings.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Andrade, Jose, (search)
Andrade, Jose, Diplomatist; born in Merida, Venezuela, in 1838; studied law in Columbia College; was successively treasurer, secretary, and governor of the state of Zulia in 1880-84; representative for the same state in the National House of Representatives in 1884-88; and was appointed plenipotentiary to settle the claims of France against Venezuela in 1888. In 1889-90 he represented Venezuela in Washington, D. C., as a member of the Venezuelan and Marine Commissions; was also a delegate 1884-88; and was appointed plenipotentiary to settle the claims of France against Venezuela in 1888. In 1889-90 he represented Venezuela in Washington, D. C., as a member of the Venezuelan and Marine Commissions; was also a delegate to the International Maritime Conference, and to the Pan-American Congress; in 1893 served in the National Assembly which framed the new constitution of Venezuela and in the same year was appointed minister to the United States. In 1895 he was a member of the United States and Venezuela Claims Commission in Washington. On Feb. 2, 1897, he signed the treaty of arbitration between Venezuela and England to arrange the boundary dispute: the same year was a delegate to the Universal Postal Congress
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Andrews, Charles McLean, 1863- (search)
Andrews, Charles McLean, 1863- Historian; born at Wethersfield, Conn., Feb. 22, 1863; was graduated at Trinity College, Hartford, in 1884; and was called to the Chair of History in Bryn Mawr College in 1889. His publications include The River towns of Connecticut; The old English Manor; The Historical development of modern Europe; and articles in reviews and historical periodicals.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aqueducts. (search)
aqueduct is the one still in use at Syracuse. The most famous Roman aqueducts were the Aqua Apia, 10 miles in length; the Aqua Martia, 60 miles; the Aqua Julia, 15 miles, and the Aqua Claudia, 46 miles. With the exception of the Claudia, all these were constructed before the birth of Christ. Among the most important aqueducts in the United States are the following: The old Croton, New York City, built 1837-42, length, 38 1/4 miles, capacity, 100 million gallons daily. The new Croton, built 1884-90, length 30 1/2 miles, capacity, 250 million gallons daily. Washington Aqueduct, built 1852-59, two 4-foot pipes. Boston, from Sudbury River, built 1875-78, length, 16 miles. Baltimore, from Gunpowder River, built 1875-81, length, 7 miles. The Sutro tunnel, 4 miles long, constructed to drain the Comstock Lode, Nevada, at a depth of 1,600 feet. It was chartered February 4, 1865, and completed June 30, 1879. Many important works for the purpose of irrigation are now under construction in t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Badeau, Adam, 1831-1895 (search)
Badeau, Adam, 1831-1895 Military officer; born in New York, Dec. 29, 1831; served on the staff of General Sherman early in the Civil War; was severely wounded at Port Hudson; joined General Grant, and became his military secretary, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, in January, 1864; and was made aide-de-camp to the general of the army, with the title of colonel, in March, 1865; and retired in 1869, holding the rank of captain, U. S. C., and brevet brigadier-general, U. S. V. He was consul-general in London in 1870-81; accompanied General Grant on his journey around the world in 1877-78; and was consul-general in Havana in 1882-84. After General Grant's death Badeau lost a suit against the heirs for compensation for alleged services in the preparation of General Grant's Memoirs. He published Military history of Ulysscs S. Grant; Grant in peace, and several romances. He died in Ridgewood, N. J., March 19, 1895.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bangs, John Kendrick, 1862- (search)
Bangs, John Kendrick, 1862- Author; born in Yonkers, N. Y., May 27, 1862; was graduated at Columbia University in 1883; studied law; became associate editor of Life in 1884; editor of Drawer in 1888, and of Literary notes in Harper's magazine in 1898; and editor of Harper's weekly in 1900.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barton, Clara, 1830- (search)
, and in 1872 performed a similar work in Paris. For her services she was decorated with the Golden Cross of Baden and the Iron Cross of Germany. In 1881, when the American Red Cross Society was formed, she was made its president, and as such in 1884 directed the measures to aid the sufferers by the Mississippi and Ohio floods. In 1883 she was made the superintendent, steward, and treasurer of the Reformatory Prison for Women, at Sherborn. Mass., and in the same year was special commissioner of foreign exhibits at the New Orleans Exposition. In 1884 she was a delegate of the United States to the Red Cross Conference, and also to the International Peace Conference, both held in Geneva, Switzerland. In 1889 she directed the movements for the relief of the sufferers by the flood at Johnstown, Pa.. and in 1896 went to Armenia and personally managed the relief measures. Prior to the war with Spain she carried supplies to the reconcentrados of Cuba. at the request of President McKin
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...