Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1887 AD or search for 1887 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dole, Sanford Ballard, 1844- (search)
cated at Oahu College, Hawaii, and Williams College, Williamstown, Mass.; was admitted to the bar in Boston, and returned to Honolulu to practise. He was a member of the Hawaii legislature in 1884 and 1886; became active in the reform movement of 1887; was judge of the Supreme Court of Hawaii in 1887-93; was chosen chief of the provisional government in 1893, and in the following year was elected president under the constitution of the newly formed republic for the period of seven years. He was86; became active in the reform movement of 1887; was judge of the Supreme Court of Hawaii in 1887-93; was chosen chief of the provisional government in 1893, and in the following year was elected president under the constitution of the newly formed republic for the period of seven years. He was an active promoter of the movement for Sanford Ballard Dole. the annexation of Hawaii to the United States, and after the act was completed (1898) he was appointed governor of the Territory of Hawaii.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Doniphan, Alexander William, 1808-1887 (search)
Doniphan, Alexander William, 1808-1887 Military officer; born in Kentucky, July 9, 1808; graduated at Augusta College in 1826; admitted to the bar in 1830. In addition to his legal studies he was interested in military matters and became brigadier-general in the Missouri State militia. In 1838 he compelled the Mormons (q. v.)under Joseph Smith, to give up their leaders for trial, lay down their arms, and leave the State. In 1846 he entered the United States service as colonel of the 1st Missouri Regiment; in December of that year he defeated a superior force of Mexicans at Brazito River (q. v.); two days later he occupied El Paso. In February, 1847, with less than 1,000 men, after a march of over 200 miles through a sterile country, he met a force of 4,000 Mexicans at the pass of Sacramento. He attacked with such vigor that the Mexicans were soon overpowered, having lost over 800 in killed and wounded, Doniphan's own loss being one man killed, eleven wounded. He subsequently
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Edmunds, George Franklin, 1828- (search)
Edmunds, George Franklin, 1828- Statesman; born in Richmond, Vt., Feb. 1, 1828; took an early and active part in Vermont politics, serving several terms in both houses of the legislature; was speaker of the House of Representatives and president pro tem. of the Senate. In 1866 he entered the United States Senate as a Republican, and till 1891 was one of the foremost men in Congress. Towards the close of his senatorial career he was the author of the acts of 1882 and 1887 for the suppression of polygamy and the regulation of affairs in Utah, and of the anti-trust law (1890). In 1886 he framed the act for counting the electoral vote. He resigned his seat in 1891 at the conclusion of twenty-five years of uninterrupted service. In 1897 he was chosen chairman of the monetary commission George Franklin Edmunds. appointed by the Indianapolis monetary conference, which reported to Congress a scheme of currency reform.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Emory, William Helmsley, 1811-1887 (search)
Emory, William Helmsley, 1811-1887 Military officer; born in Queen Anne's county, Md., Sept. 9, 1811; graduated at West Point in 1831. He was appointed lieutenant of the topographical engineers July 7, 1833; was aide to General Kearny in California in 1846-47, and was made lieutenant-colonel, Sept. 30, 1847. He was astronomer to the commission to determine the boundary between the United States and Mexico. He was serving as captain of cavalry in Mexico when the Civil War broke out, and brought his command into Kansas in good order. In May, 1861, he was made lieutenant-colonel of the 6th Cavalry; served in the campaign of 1862 in the Army of the Potomac, and was made brigadier-general of volunteers in March of that year. He did good service under Banks in Louisiana, and under Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. He was made colonel of the 5th Cavalry in the fall of 1863; in March, 1865, was brevetted brigadier-general and major-general of the United States army; and in 1876 was
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Engineering. (search)
n done in other countries. Much has been written of the energy of Russia in building 3,000 miles of Siberian railway in five or six years. In the United States an average of 6,147 miles was completed every year during ten successive years, and in 1887 there were built 12,982 miles. They were built economically, and at first in not as solid a manner as those of Europe. Steeper gradients, sharper curves, and lighter rails were used. This rendered necessary a different kind of rolling-stock suitin which men can work in compressed air without injury, and this is not much over 100 feet. The foundations of the Brooklyn and St. Louis bridges were put down in this manner. In the construction of the Poughkeepsie bridge over the Hudson in 1887-88, it became necessary to go down 135 feet below tide-level before hard bottom was reached. Another process was invented to take the place of compressed air. Timber caissons were built, having double sides, and the spaces between them filled wit
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fairchild, Charles Stebbins 1842- (search)
Fairchild, Charles Stebbins 1842- Lawyer; born in Cazenovia, N. Y., April 30, 1842; graduated at Harvard in 1863; admitted to the New York bar in 1865; appointed Secretary of the United States Treasury in 1887; was affiliated with the Democratic party, but acted with the Gold Democrats in 1897, taking a prominent part in the Indianapolis Monetary Conference. Lucius Fairchild.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Farmers' Alliance, (search)
Farmers' Alliance, A political organization that originated soon after the close of the Civil War. The main purpose of this movement was the mutual protection of farmers against the encroachment of capital. The first body was organized in Texas to prevent the wholesale purchase of public land by private individuals. In 1887 the Farmers' Union of Louisiana united with the Texas organization under the name of the Farmers' Alliance and Co-operative Union of America. The movement soon spread into Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, North and South Carolina, Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi. In 1889 a similar organization, which had been formed in 1877 in Illinois, and which had spread into neighboring States, was amalgamated with the Southern Alliance, and the name of Farmers' Alliance and Industrial Union was adopted. The founders of the alliance held that the party was formed along political lines because the parties already existing failed to undertake to solve the problems cover
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Florida, (search)
1866 David S. Walker1866 to 1868 Harrison Reed1868 to 1872 Ossian B. Hart1872 to 1874 Marcellus L. Stearns1874 to 1877 George F. Drew1877 to 1881 William D. Bloxham1881 to 1885 Edward A. Perry1885 to 1889 Francis P. Fleming1889 to 1893 Henry L. Mitchell1893 to 1897 William D. Bloxham1897 to 1901 William S. Jennings1901 to — United States Senators. NameNo. of CongressDate. James D. Westcott, Jr29th to 30th1845 to 1849 David L. Yulee29th to 31st1845 to 1851 Jackson Morton31st to 33d1849 to 1855 Stephen R. Mallory32d to 36th1851 to 1861 David L. Yulee34th to 36th1855 to 1861 [37th, 38th, and 39th Congresses, seats vacant.] Thomas W. Osborn40th to 42d1868 to 1873 Adonijah S. Welch40th1868 to — Abijah Gilbert41st to 43d1869 to 1875 Simon B. Conover43d to 45th1873 to 1879 Charles W. Jones44th to 49th1875 to 1887 Wilkinson Call46th to 54th1879 to 1897 Samuel Pasco50th to 56th1887 to 1899 Stephen R. Mallory54th to —1897 to — James P. Taliaferro56th to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Foraker, Joseph Benson (search)
Foraker, Joseph Benson Statesman; born near Rainsboro, O., July 5, 1846; graduated at Cornell in 1869 and admitted to the bar the same year. He enlisted in the 89th Ohio Regiment on July 14, 1862; was made sergeant August, 1862; received the commission of first lieutenant March 14, 1864; elected governor of Ohio in 1885 and 1887, and United States Senator for the term 1897-1903. In 1900 he was chairman of the committee on Pacific islands and Porto Rico, and a member of the committee on foreign relations.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Franklin, Samuel Rhoads 1825- (search)
Franklin, Samuel Rhoads 1825- Naval officer; born in York, Pa., Aug. 25, 1825; was appointed midshipman Feb. 18, 1841; was promoted to passed midshipman, Aug. 10, 1847; master, April 18, 1855; lieutenant, Sept. 4, 1855; lieutenant-commander, Sept. 26, 1866: captain, Aug. 13, 1872; commodore, Dec. 15, 1880; and rear-admiral, Jan. 24, 1885; and was retired in 1887. Most of his forty-six years of service was spent at sea. During both the Mexican and Civil wars he was active in the most important operations. He was president of the international marine Conference; is a member of the Washington National Monument Association; and is author of Memories of a rear-admiral.
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