hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
l be a permanent annual donation......Aug. 30, 1890 Single Tax Convention meets at New York City, Sept. 2, and adopts a platform......Sept. 3, 1890 Criminal jurisdiction of United States circuit and district courts extended to the Great Lakes and connecting waters by act......Sept. 4, 1890 Direct Trade Convention, with delegates from six cotton-producing States, organizes at Atlanta, Ga.......Sept. 10, 1890 Strike of trainmen on the New York Central Railroad declared off......Sept. 17, 1890 Act amending section 3,894 of Revised Statutes, relating to advertising of lottery tickets, approved......Sept. 19, 1890 River and harbor bill, appropriating $24,981,295, approved......Sept. 19, 1890 Bronze statue of Horace Greeley, by John Quincy Adams Ward, unveiled in front of the Tribune building, New York City......Sept. 20, 1890 Act reserving as a public park the bigtree groves in townships 17 and 18 south, in California......Sept. 25, 1890 Coinage of $3 and $1 gold
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
world of electricity, William Kemmler (murderer) at Auburn prison......Aug. 6, 1890 Strike of 3,000 trainmen owing to discharge of certain Knights of Labor on the New York Central Railroad......Aug. 8, 1890 Boundary-line with Pennsylvania agreed upon by commissioners, March 26, 1886, approved by Congress......Aug. 19, 1890 Single-tax convention meets in New York City, Sept. 2, and adopts a platform......Sept. 3, 1890 Strike on the New York Central Railroad declared off......Sept. 17, 1890 Governor Hill is elected United States Senator from New York, receiving eightyone votes on joint ballot, to seventy-nine for Evarts......Jan. 21, 1891 Secretary of the Treasury, William Windom, born 1827, dies suddenly at a banquet at Delmonico's, New York......Jan. 29, 1891 Board of regents of the University adopt a plan for university extension under a university extension council of five representatives of colleges to be appointed annually......Feb. 11, 1891 Gen. William T
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2 (search)
arshall for valuable contributions, which have commanded profound attention. The latest, most familiar to the public, being his oration delivered at the laying of the corner-stone of the Lee Monument at Richmond, October 27, 1887. (Published in the Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XVII, pp. 215-245—Lee Monument Memorial Volume.) Doubtless Colonel Marshall will favor the public, in book form, with the valuable papers in his possession left by General Lee.] Auburn, Alabama, September 17, 1890. my dear Sir: I herewith send you copies of the editorial in the Petersburg Index and my reply in the Richmond Dispatch. Should you wish further evidence of the gross injustice of the editorial, which I have always thought was prompted by General Mahone you are respectfully referred to the following: Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. II, pp. 300, 301; Vol. III, pp. 19, 28; Vol. IX, pp. 103, 107; 124, 129; 145, 156. A Correspondence between Generals Earl and Mahon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The artillery defenders of Fort Gregg. (search)
the Southern Historical Society Papers (XVIII) sent me several communications from General James H. Lane in reference to the actions of his brigade on different fields and and occasions, that the old question as to the defenders of Fort Gregg is again revived. The old question as to who the real defenders were will not down Mississippians, North Carolinians or Georgians; and again the credit of the artillery is given to Chew's Maryland battery. General Lane in a letter to you dated September 17, 1890, writes (Southern Historical Magazine, Volume XVIII, page 80): The true defenders at Fort Gregg were a part of Lane's North Carolina brigade, Walker's supernumerary artillerists of A. P. Hill's corps, armed as infantry, and a part of Chew's Maryland battery. Harris' brigade and a few pieces of artillery occupied Fort Alexander (Whitworth), which was to the rear of Fort Gregg and higher up the Appomattox; and that fort was evacuated, the infantry and artillery retiring to the