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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Altgeld, John Peter, 1847- (search)
Altgeld, John Peter, 1847- Lawyer; born in Germany, in December, 1847; was brought to the United States in infancy by his parents, who settled near Mansfield, O.; received a public school education; entered the Union army in 1863, and served till the close of the war. In 1869 he was admitted to the Missouri bar; in 1874 was elected State attorney of Andrew county, Mo.; in the following year removed to Chicago; in 1886-91 was judge of the superior court of that city; and in 1893-97 was governor of Illinois. His action in pardoning (June 27, 1893) Fielden, Schwab, and Neebe, who had been imprisoned for complicity in the Haymarket atrocity by alleged anarchists, excited strong and general criticism (see anarchists; Chicago). His publications include Our penal machinery and its victims; Lice questions; Oratory; Its requirements and its rewards (1901); etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ames, Herman Vandenburg, 1865- (search)
Ames, Herman Vandenburg, 1865- Historian; born in Lancaster, Mass., Aug. 7, 1865; was graduated at Amherst College in 1888 and later studied in Germany. In 1891-94 he was an instructor in History at the University of Michigan; in 1896-97 occupied a similar post in Ohio State University; and in the latter year accepted the chair of American Constitutional History in the University of Pennsylvania. He is author of The proposed amendments to the Constitution of the United States, for which he was awarded the prize of the American Historical Association in 1897.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anderson, Larz, 1866- (search)
Anderson, Larz, 1866- Diplomatist; born in Paris, France, Aug. 15, 1866; was graduated at Harvard College in 1888; spent two years in foreign travel: was second secretary of the United States legation and embassy in London in 1891-93, and first secretary of the embassy in Rome in 1893-97. During the war with Spain he served as a captain and adjutant-general of United States volunteers.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arizona, (search)
merely apostate offshoots from this original tribe, and the Zunis being the only pure, original stock, children of the sun, now upon the earth. Governors of the Territory.  Term of Office. R. C. McCormick1867-69 A. P. K. Safford1870-77 John P. Hoyt1878 John C. Fremont1879-82 Frederick Tuttle1882-85 C. Meyer Zulick1885-89 Lewis Wolfley1889-91 John N. Irwin1891-92 Nathan O. Murphy1892-94 Lewis C. Hughes1894-96 Benj. J. Franklin1896-97 Myron H. McCord1897-99 Nathan O. Murphy1899-- merely apostate offshoots from this original tribe, and the Zunis being the only pure, original stock, children of the sun, now upon the earth. Governors of the Territory.  Term of Office. R. C. McCormick1867-69 A. P. K. Safford1870-77 John P. Hoyt1878 John C. Fremont1879-82 Frederick Tuttle1882-85 C. Meyer Zulick1885-89 Lewis Wolfley1889-91 John N. Irwin1891-92 Nathan O. Murphy1892-94 Lewis C. Hughes1894-96 Benj. J. Franklin1896-97 Myron H. McCord1897-99 Nathan O. Murphy1899-
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arnold, Abraham Kerns, 1837- (search)
Arnold, Abraham Kerns, 1837- Military officer; born in Bedford, Pa., March 24, 1837; was graduated at the United States Military Academy and brevetted a second lieutenant in 1859; colonel of the 8th Cavalry in 1891. He served through the Civil War with distinction, and was awarded a Congressional medal of honor for exceptional bravery in the engagement at Davenport Bridge. North Anna River, Va., May 18. 1864. After the Civil War he served in the Indian country. On May 4. 1898, he was commissioned a brigadier-general of volunteers, and served through the American-Spanish War. He was discharged from the volunteer service May 12, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Avery, Samuel Putnam, (search)
Avery, Samuel Putnam, Benefactor; horn in New York City, March 17, 1822; began his business career as a copperplate and wood engraver; in 1865 became an art publisher and dealer; and retired in 1888. He was a founder of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and is a life member of the American Geographicall Society, American Historical Society, American Zoological Society, and American Museum of Natural History. He has also been president of the Grolier Club, and of the Sculpture Society. In 1891 he and his wife established the Avery Architectural Library in Columbia Universit'y, in memory of their deceased son. In 1900 he gave to the New York public Library (q. v.) a collection of photographs, lithographs, and etchings. amounting in all to over 17,500 pieces, and, with this magnificent collection, a large number of art volumes.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bailey, William Henry, 1831- (search)
Bailey, William Henry, 1831- Lawyer; born in Pasquatauk county, N. C., Jan. 22, 1831; was elected and appointed to many offices in his native State; removed to Texas in 1891; is the author of The effect of Cicil War upon the rights of persons and property; Conflict of judicial decisions, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ball, Thomas, 1819- (search)
Ball, Thomas, 1819- Sculptor; born in Charlestown, Mass., June 3, 1819; educated at Mayhew School, Boston. In 1840-52 he applied himself to painting. but in 1851 undertook sculpture. He designed and executed the equestrian statue of Washington in Boston, the statue of Daniel Webster in Central Park. New York, and other similar works. In 1891-98 he was engaged on a monument of Washington for Methuen, Mass. He became an honorary fellow of the National Sculptors' Society in 1896. He is the author of My three-score years and ten: an autobiography, which attracted much attention.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Banks, Nathaniel Prentiss, 1816-1894 (search)
was a member of the Massachusetts legislature, and speaker of the Lower House in 1851-52. He was president of the State Constitutional Convention in 1853, and a member of Congress in 1853-57, separating from the Democratic party on the question of slavery; and, after a long contest, was elected speaker of the House of Representatives in 1855. Mr. Banks was chosen governor of Massachusetts in 1858, and served until 1861. When the Civil War broke out he Nathaniel Prentiss Banks. was president of the Illinois Central Railroad. Offering his services to President Lincoln, he was made a major-general of volunteers May 16, 1861, and appointed to command the Annapolis military district. General Banks was an active and skilful leader in various battles during the war in Virginia and in the region of the lower Mississippi and Red rivers. In 1865-73, 1875-77, and 1889-91 he was a Representative in Congress, and subsequently he was United States marshal. He died in Waltham, Sept. 1, 1894.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnes, James, 1866-1869 (search)
Barnes, James, 1866-1869 author: born in Annapolis, Md., Sept. 19, 1866; was graduated at Princeton College in 1891: author Of naval actions of 1812; For King or country; A loyal traitor; Midshipman Farragut, etc. military officer; born in Boston, Mass., about 1809); was graduated at West Point in 1829, and resigned in 1836. He became colonel of a Massachusetts volunteer regiment in 1861, and in November of that year was made brigadier-general in the Army of the Potomac, participating in its most exciting operations. He commanded a division at the battle of Gettysburg, and was severely wounded. He was brevetted major-general of volunteers in March, 1865, and was mustered out of the service Jan. 15, 1866. He died in Springfield, Mass., Feb. 12, 1869.
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