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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cahenslyism, (search)
olics be obliged to join German-speaking churches, and be forbidden attending those speaking English. Receiving no open answer, they formed, in 1887, a society which sent representatives that year to the St. Raphael Society at Lucerne, Switzerland, and enlisted the cooperation of Herr Cahensly. They also secured the co-operation of many German bishops and priests in the United States, and especially of Archbishop Katzer, of Milwaukee; but were opposed by many others, especially by Cardinal Gibbons, of Baltimore, who, at the installation of Archbishop Katzer, in 1891, denounced the movement as unpatriotic and disloyal. A provincial congress of German-Catholic societies at Dubuque, Ia., in 1892, approved the movement, as did also a national congress in Newark, N. J.; but it seemed overshadowed later by the predominance of more liberal views under the decisions of Monsignor Satolli, in 1892 and 1893; and Archbishop Corrigan publicly declared it a dead issue, and condemned by the Pope.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), California (search)
3 to 1867 Henry H. Haight1867 to 1871 Newton Booth1871 to 1875 Romnaldo Pacheco1875 William Irwin1875 to 1880 George C. Perkins1880 to 1883 George Stoneman1883 to 1887 Washington Bartlett1887 Robert W. Waterman1887 to 1891 Henry H. Markhan1891 to 1895 J. H. Budd1895 to 1899 Henry T. Gage1899 to 1903 United States Senators. Name.No. of CongressTerm. John C. Fremont31st1849 to 1851 William M. Gwin31st to 36th1849 to 1861 John B. Weller32d to 34th1851 to 1857 David C. Broderick3 to 1869 Cornelius Cole40th to 42d1867 to 1873 Eugene Casserly41st to 43d1869 to 1873 John S. Hager43d1874 Aaron A. Sargent43d to 45th1873 to 1879 Newton Booth44th to 46th1875 to 1881 James T. Farley46th to 48th1879 to 1885 John F. Miller47th to 49th1881 to 1887 Leland Stanford49th to 53d1885 to 1893 George Hearst50th to 51st1887 to 1891 Charles N. Felton52d to 53d1891 to 1893 Stephen M. White53d to 56th1893 to 1899 George C. Perkins53d1893 to —— Thomas R. Bard56th to ——1899
nd, the Hudson Bay Territory, British Columbia, and Newfoundland, with its dependency, Labrador. In the new government the executive authority is vested in the Queen, and her representative in the Dominion is the acting governor-general, who is advised and aided by a privy council of fourteen members, constituting the ministry, who must be sustained by a Parliamentary majority. There is a Parliament composed of two chambers, the Senate and the House of Commons. According to the census of 1891 the population of the Dominion, by provinces, was as follows: Ontario2,114,321 Quebec1,488,535 Nova Scotia450,396 New Brunswick321.263 Manitoba152,506 British Columbia98,173 Prince Edward Island109,078 Northwest Territories98,967 ———— Total4,833,239 Official statistics for the fiscal year ending June 30. 1S99, contained the following general items: Imports of merchandise, $162,764,308; exports, $158,896,905, of which $137,360,792 represented Canadian productions; gross debt, $
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cannon, (search)
dynamite torpedo-gun built and mounted at Fort Lafayette (founded on invention of D. M. Mefford, of Ohio), 1885. Congress makes an appropriation for the establishment of a plant for gunmaking at the Watervliet arsenal, West Troy, 1889. Manufacture of heavy ordnance begun at the Washington navy-yard, 1890. Hotchkiss gun, English make, five barrels, revolving around a common axis, placed upon block weighing about 386 tons, fires thirty rounds a minute; adopted by the United States in 1891. Automatic rapid-firing gun, invented by John and Matthew Browning, of Ogden, Utah; firing 400 shots in one minute and forty-nine seconds; adopted by the United States in 1896. Zalinski's dynamite gun, calibre 15 ins.; throws 500 lbs. of explosive gelatine 2,100 yds.; also discharges smaller shells. Three of the guns of this class were used with tremendous effect by the United States dynamite cruiser Vesuvius at the bombardment of Santiago de Cuba in 1898, and larger ones have been ins
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cape Breton (search)
Cape Breton A large island at the entrance of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and separated from Nova Scotia by the narrow strait of Canso; discovered by Cabot, 1497. The French fortress Louisburg (q. v.) was situated on this island. This was taken by the New England troops in 1745. Island ceded to England, Feb. 10, 1763; incorporated with Nova Scotia, 1819. Population, 1891, 86,914.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Caroline Islands (search)
les II. of Spain, 1686. These islands were virtually given up to Spain in 1876. The Germans occupying some of the islands, Spain protested in August, 1885. Spanish vessels arrived at the island of Yop, Aug. 21; the Germans landed and set up their flag, Aug. 24; dispute referred to the Pope; the sovereignty awarded to Spain, with commercial concessions to Germany and Great Britain; agreement signed, Nov. 25; confirmed at Rome, Dec. 17, 1885; natives subdued, Spaniards in full possession, 1891. During the American-Spanish War there were frequent rumors that the United States was about to seize the islands; but the group was sold by Spain to Germany in 1899. The chief American interest in the Caroline Islands lies in the facts that American missionaries began work on the island of Ponape in 1852, the pioneers being believed to have been the first white people to occupy that island; that after the missionary board had expended over $400,000 in its work there were frequent massacr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carter, Samuel Powhatan 1819-1891 (search)
Carter, Samuel Powhatan 1819-1891 Naval and military officer; born in Elizabethtown, Tenn., Aug. 6, 1819; was educated at Princeton College; entered the navy in February, 1840, and became assistant instructor of seamanship at the Naval Academy in 1857. At the beginning of the Civil War he was transferred to the War Department and temporarily served in drilling recruits from eastern Tennessee. He served through the war with much gallantry, and on March 13, 1865, received the brevet of major-general. He then re-entered the navy; in 1869-72 was commandant of the Naval Academy; retired Aug. 6, 1881; and was promoted rear-admiral May 16, 1882. He died in Washington, May 26, 1891.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chapelle, Placide Louis 1842- (search)
ide Louis 1842- Clergyman; born in Mende, France, Aug. 28, 1842. He came to the United States in 1859; and was graduated at St. Mary's College, and ordained a Roman Catholic priest in 1865. For five years he was a missionary, and from 1870 to 1891 held pastorates in Baltimore and Washington. He was made coadjutor archbishop of Santa Fe in 1891; archbishop in 1894; and archbishop of New Orleans in 1897. The following years he was appointed by the Pope Apostolic Delegate to Cuba, Porto Rico priest in 1865. For five years he was a missionary, and from 1870 to 1891 held pastorates in Baltimore and Washington. He was made coadjutor archbishop of Santa Fe in 1891; archbishop in 1894; and archbishop of New Orleans in 1897. The following years he was appointed by the Pope Apostolic Delegate to Cuba, Porto Rico, and the Philippines, and after a brief service in Cuba he went to the Philippines. where in 1901 he greatly aided the American authorities in establishing civil governments.
tain abuses of power on the part of the President of that republic, and the conflict was carried on with great bitterness between his adherents and the revolutionary party with the Chilean Congress at its head. Early in the course of the war almost the entire Chilean navy deserted the cause of the President and espoused that of the revolutionists. Among the vessels employed by the latter was the Itata, originally a merchant ship, but then armed and refitted as a cruiser. In the spring of 1891 this vessel put in at the harbor of San Diego, Cal., for the purpose of securing a cargo of arms and ammunition for the revolutionists. The secret, however, was not well kept, and when it came to the knowledge of the United States authorities, steps were at once taken to prevent her from accomplishing the object of her mission. Officers acting under the neutrality laws seized the vessel and placed a United States deputy marshal on board. Soon afterwards, on the night of May 6, the Itata,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colorado (search)
ident Lincoln John Evans1862-65President Lincoln Alexander Cummings1865-67President Johnson A. C. Hunt1867-69President Johnson Edward M. McCook1869-73President Grant Samuel H. Elbert1873-74President Grant Edward M. McCook1874-75President Grant John L. Routt1875-76President Grant State governors. Name. Term. John L. Routt 1876 to 1878 Fred. W. Pitkin1879 to 1882 James B. Grant1883 to 1886 Benj. H. Eaton 1885 to 1886 Alvah Adams 1887 to 1888 Job A. Cooper 1889 to 1890 John L. Routt1891 to 1893 Davis H. Waite 1893 to 1895 A. W. McIntyre 1895 to 1897 Alvah Adams 1897 to 1899 Charles S. Thomas 1899 to 1901 James B. Orman 1901 to 1903 United States senators. Name. No. of Congress. Term. Jerome B. Chaffee44th to 45th1876 to 1879 Henry M. Teller44th to 47th 1877 to 1883 Nathaniel P. Hill46th to 48th1879 to 1885 Thomas M. Bowen48th to 50th1883 to 1889 Henry M. Teller 49th 1885 to — Edward O. Wolcott51st to 57th1889 to 1901 Thomas Patterson57th to —1901
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