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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 20, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Conger, Edwin Hurd 1843- (search)
ntered the Albany Law School, where he graduated in 1866; practised law in Galesburg, Ill.; and after 1868 was enagaged in banking and stockraising in Iowa. He was State treasurer Edwin Hurd Conger. of Iowa in 1882-85; member of Congress in 1885-91; and minister to Brazil in 1891-95, being reappointed to the latter post in 1897. On Jan. 12, 1898, he was transferred to China, and served in Peking during the critical days of the Boxer uprising in 1900, and the subsequent negotiations for peacractised law in Galesburg, Ill.; and after 1868 was enagaged in banking and stockraising in Iowa. He was State treasurer Edwin Hurd Conger. of Iowa in 1882-85; member of Congress in 1885-91; and minister to Brazil in 1891-95, being reappointed to the latter post in 1897. On Jan. 12, 1898, he was transferred to China, and served in Peking during the critical days of the Boxer uprising in 1900, and the subsequent negotiations for peace and the restoration of order in that country. See China.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut (search)
W. T. Minor 1855 to 1857 A. H. Holley 1857 to 1858 William A. Buckingham 1858 to 1866 Joseph R. Hawley 1866 to 1867 James E. English1867 to 1869 Marshall Jewell 1869 to 1870 James E. English 1870 to 1871 Marshall Jewell1871 to 1873 Charles R. Ingersoll 1873 to 1876 R. D. Hubbard 1876 to 1879 Charles B. Andrews 1879 to 1881 H. B. Bigelow 1881 to 1883 Thomas M. Waller 1883 to 1885 Henry B. Harrison 1885 to 1887 Phineas C. Lounsbury 1887 to 1889 Morgan G. Bulkeley 1889 to 1891 to 1891 to 1893 Luzon B. Morris1893 to 1895 O Vincent Coffin 1895 to 1897 Lorrin A. Cooke 1897 to 1899 George E. Lounsbury 1899 to 1901 George P. McLean 1901 to 1903 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Date. Oliver Ellsworth 1st to 4th1789 to 1797 William S. Johnson 1st1789 to 1791 Roger Sherman 2d1791 to 1793 Stephen Nix Mitchell 3d1793 to 1795 James Hillhouse 4th to 11th1796 to 1811 Jonathan Trumbull4th1795 to 1796 Uriah Tracy 4th to 9th1796 to 1807 Chauncey Goodrich 10th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connor, Patrick Edward 1820-1891 (search)
Connor, Patrick Edward 1820-1891 Military officer; born in Ireland, March 17, 1820; came to the United States and was educated in New York City; served in the war with Mexico and then engaged in business in California. When the Civil War broke out he recruited a band of 200 men and was ordered to Utah to drive plundering Indians out of the overland routes of travel, and to check the threatened revolt among the Mormons. After marching 140 miles he fell upon a fortified camp of 300 Indians in Washington Territory and destroyed the whole band. At the close of the war he received the brevet of majorgeneral. Later he commanded 2,000 cavalry to punish the Sioux and Arapahoe Indians for their robberies. He met and defeated the latter at Tongue River in August, 1865. He died in Salt Lake City, Utah, Dec. 18, 1891.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Conrad, Joseph 1830-1891 (search)
Conrad, Joseph 1830-1891 Military officer; born in Wied-Selters, Germany, May 17, 1830; graduated at the Hesse-Darmstadt Military Academy in 1848; settled in Missouri; and joined the National army at the beginning of the Civil War in the 3d Missouri Infantry. He was present at many important actions during the war; was brevetted brigadier-general of volunteers at its close; joined the regular army in 1866; and was retired with the rank of colonel in 1882. He died in Fort Randall, S. D., Dec. 4, 1891.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Consular service, the (search)
ntil he has served at least three years in a grade. There are, furthermore, chancellors also whose chief functions are to keep the accounts; interpreters and dragomen for the Levant and Asiatic services, who attain those posts by means of special examinations, and may eventually become vice-consuls, with hope of subsequent promotion. In addition to the foregoing safeguards, a committee of consultation on consulates (Comite Consultative de Consulats) was created by Presidential decree in 1891. It consists of twenty-five members, of whom three are senators, five members of the Chamber of Deputies, and nine presidents of leading chambers of commerce. Its functions are to advise the minister on matters pertaining to the consular service, particularly in connection with the development of trade. Many more details might be given of the elaborate precautions taken by the French, but this sketch will suffice to give a general idea on the subject. Want of space prevents me from
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Copyright law. (search)
ke injurious to the business of publishing and to the best interests of the public. After this frequent efforts were made to secure a change in the law, and several bills were introduced into Congress from time to time with that object in view. In 1883 an association called The American Copyright League was founded for the purpose of securing the co-operation of authors and publishers in advancing the cause of international justice, and through its persistent efforts the copyright bill of 1891 was finally passed. When first voted upon in the House of Representatives this bill was defeated by a very small majority. Early in the next session of Congress it was again brought up and passed by a vote of 139 to 95. In the Senate action was delayed until almost the last day of the session. It was at length passed with several objectionable amendments attached, but through the conference committee, to which it was referred, it was adopted substantially as reported from the House. It w
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Creswell, John Angell James 1828-1891 (search)
Creswell, John Angell James 1828-1891 Legislator; born in Port Deposit, Md., Nov. 18, 1828; graduated at Dickinson College in 1848; admitted to the bar in 1850; elected to Congress as a Republican in 1863; and to the United States Senate to fill a vacancy in 1864. He was a delegate to the Baltimore Convention in 1864; the Loyalists' Convention in Philadelphia in 1866; the Border States Convention in Baltimore in 1867; and the National Republican Convention in 1868. In 1869-74 he was Postmaster-General of the United States; and was one of the counsel for the United States before the Court of Alabama Claims Commissioners. He died in Elkton, Md., Dec. 23, 1891.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Crisp, Charles Frederick 1845-1896 (search)
Crisp, Charles Frederick 1845-1896 Jurist; born in Sheffield, England, Jan. 9, 1845, of American parents travelling abroad; was brought to the United States when a few months old, the family settling in Georgia. He served in the Confederate army, and, settling to the practice of law, became a judge of the Superior Court of Georgia. In 1883 he entered the national House of Representatives as a Democrat, and there gained a high reputation as an able, judicial, and conservative leader on his side of the House. In 1891, and again in 1893, he was elected speaker of the House, succeeding Thomas B. Reed, and being succeeded by him. He died in Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 23, 1896.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cullum, George Washington 1809-1892 (search)
In the volunteer service he reached the rank of brigadier-general and brevet major-general during the Civil War. He was one of the most accomplished and useful officers of engineers in the United States army, as the military works he superintended the construction of attest. From 1845 to 1848 he was instructor of practical engineering in the West Point Military Academy, during which time he spent two years in Europe. He served as aidede-camp to General Scott in 1861, and on the staff of General Halleck in 1862, accompanying him to Washington. He was an efficient member of the United States sanitary commission, and superintendent of West Point Academy from 1864 to 1866. General Cullum published several books on military affairs, and a Biographical register of the officers and graduates of West Point (1st ed., 1868; 2d ed., 1879; 3d ed., revised and extended, 1891). He bequeathed $250,000 for the erection of a military memorial hall at West Point. He died in New York, Feb. 28, 1892.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Curtis, William Baker 1821-1891 (search)
Curtis, William Baker 1821-1891 Military officer; born in Sharpsburg, Md., April 18, 1821; was a member of the Wheeling convention to organize a State government for West Virginia in 1861; entered the Union army as captain in the 12th West Virginia Infantry in 1862; and was promoted colonel and given command of a brigade in 1864. Subsequently he was appointed commander of the 2d Brigade, 24th Army Corps, in the Army of the James, with which he took part in the siege of Richmond and captured Fort Gregg, near Petersburg, on April 2, 1865; for which he was promoted brigadier-general. He died in West Liberty, W. Va., Aug. 25, 1891.
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