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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The gold and silver in the Confederate States Treasury. (search)
o the southward, the party next fell in with a sail-boat, in which were three sailors, deserters from United States vessels at Key West, trying to make their way to Savannah. Wood and party took their boat, as she was a seaworthy craft, put the sailors in the row-boat, and gave them sailing directions for Savannah. Wood then took the helm and steered for Cuba. In a squall that night he was knocked overboard. There was but one man in the boat who knew anything at all about managing her, and it looked black for him. Fortunately he caught the main sheet, which was trailing overboard, and was hauled in. It was providential, for upon Wood depended the safety of the entire party. After suffering much from hunger and thirst they arrived at Matanzas (I think) and were kindly cared for by the Spanish authorities. from whom they received most respectful attention as soon as they made themselves known. William H. Parker. Richmond, Va. [From The New Orleans Picayune, October 22, 1893.]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
Zzzgeneral Joseph E. Johnston's Campaign in Georgia. Lt.-General Leonidas Polk at Cassville. Criticisms of Gen. S. G. French. In the last volume of Southern Historical Society Papers (Xxi), pp. 314-321, there was republished from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, of Oct. 22, 1893, an article under the above caption. To this article Major-General S. G. French took exceptions in a reply, published in the Picayune, of Dec. 28, 1893. It is the mission of the Southern Historical Society to seek the truth as to every detail in the grand struggle of the South, and to place it upon record in its Papers. The reply of General French is from a corrected copy, considerately furnished by him. General French desired the statement, to be made in this connection, that his Division was composed of the brigades of Generals Cockrell, Sears and Ector. He continues: I had placed Cockrell's brigade on a range of hills early in the afternoon; now, when General Johnston formed his line of