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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 279 279 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 49 49 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 31 31 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 4 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 4 4 Browse Search
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Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XVI, Chapter 5 (search)
inst the LucaniansNo mention is made previously of this war with the Lucanians. In Book 14.100.5 Dionysius I is said to have made an alliance with the Lucanians and his policy of supporting them against the Italiot Greeks is clearly shown in chapter 101 of that Book. This seems to be the war mentioned in Plut. Dion 16.3 and Plat. L. 3.317a. For this war see Costanzi, "De bello Lucanico quod Dionysius minor recens ab imperio composuerit," Rivista di Filologia, 26 (1898), 450 ff. and then, in the latest battles having had the advantage, he gladly brought to a close the war against them. In Apulia he founded two cities because he wished to make safe for navigators the passage across the Ionian Sea; for the barbarians who dwelt along the coast were accustomed to put out in numerous pirate ships and render the whole shore along the Adriatic Sea unsafe for merchants. Thereafter, having given himself over to a peaceful existence, he relie
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 16: (search)
s desired. Mr. Andrews had no son and at once adopted John A. Logan, Jr., as his own. Mr. Andrews survived General Logan but a few years, and my son continued to reside in the Andrews' home until a year or two prior to going into the service, in 1898, when he established his home on a farm near Youngstown. Immediately after General Logan's death Senator Henry T. Harper introduced in the Illinois legislature a bill providing for the erection of an equestrian statue of General Logan in the Snal to Stockholm, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and to The Hague, Holland. From Holland we went to London, and finally reached home safely after an experience of nine months of consuming interest and great profit, intellectually and physically. In 1898 war was declared in Cuba. My son determined to enter the service. He was appointed an adjutant-general on Major-General John C. Bates's staff and he served in that capacity until hostilities ceased in Cuba, having taken part in the battles of Sa
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant, Bibliography. (search)
tford, Conn., 1887: S. S. Scranton & Co.) Contains much that is trivial, but much that is valuable. VIII. Historical essays. By Henry Adams. The four last essays. (New York, 1891: Charles Scribner's Sons.) There is no better summary of pertinent political issues. IX. Mr. Fish and the Alabama claims. By J. C. B. Davis. (Boston and New York, 1893: Houghton, Mifflin & Co.) Another excellent and absorbing summary. X. the story of the Civil War. By John Codman Ropes. (New York, 1894-98: G. P. Putnam's Sons.) Unfinished. The reader may always trust Mr. Ropes' information, but not always his judgment. XI. History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850. Volumes III. and IV. By James Ford Rhodes. (New York, 1895-99: Harper Brothers.) Unfinished. This work is steadily taking the features of a classic. No writer of any period of our history combines so many gifts,--interest, weight, thoroughness, serenity. XII. the history of the last Quarter-Century in th
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.21 (search)
your country. I have thought over all history, but I cannot call to mind a greater task than you have performed. It is not an exploration, alone, you have accomplished; it is also a great military movement, by which those who were in the British service were rescued from a position of great peril. Most truly yours, George Grey. The Rt. Hon. Sir George Grey, K. C. B., Soldier, Explorer, Administrator, Statesman, Thinker, and Dreamer, to quote James Milne, was born in 1812, and died in 1898. He was buried in St. Paul's Cathedral, being accorded a public funeral. Governor of South Australia, when twenty-nine, he was subsequently twice Governor, and, later, Premier, of New Zealand; appointed as the first Governor of Cape Colony, 1854-59, Sir George Grey, by a daring assumption of personal responsibility, probably saved India, as Lord Malmesbury said, by diverting to India British troops meant for China, and also despatching re-enforcements from the Cape — the first to reach India
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.27 (search)
in his Journal, in 1897:-- Pain has commenced — unable to take even milk without sickness; am resigned for a long illness — it is now inevitable; shall not be able to attend Parliament again this Session. I knew by the sound of his voice, when he called me in the middle of the night, that the pain had come; sometimes it left quite suddenly, and we looked at each other, I, pale with fear, lest it should return. In 1897, the attack recorded above did not last, as he had feared, but, in 1898, at Cauterets, in the Pyrenees, he was again taken ill. He writes in his Journal, August 15th:-- Felt the first severe symptoms of a recurring attack. Have had two attacks of fever, and now have steady pain since Sunday night, but rose to-day. August 17th, Luchon. On arriving, went to bed at once, for my pains threatened to become unbearable. September 11. Biarritz. All I know of Luchon is what I have gained during two short walks in the intervals of illness. On arriving here, I
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.29 (search)
Chapter XXV Furze Hill in the autumn of 1898, Stanley decided to look for a house in the country. We had lived, since our marriage, at 2, Richmond Terrace, Whitehall, close to the Houses of Parliament and Westminster Abbey; but though we were near the Thames and St. James Park, Stanley naturally felt the need of a more open-air life. We therefore decided to have a country retreat, as well as the home in town. In his Journal, November 1, 1898, he writes:-- To live at all, I must have open air, and to enjoy the open air, I must move briskly. I but wait to have a little more strength, when I can begin the search for a suitable house, with some land attached. It has long been my wish, and the mere thought of having come to a decision, that it is imperative to possess such a thing, before it is too late, tends towards the improvement of my health. Whatever Stanley undertook was thoroughly done. He collected lists of most of the House and Estate-agents, cut out the adverti
lush, waving grass beautifies this Union fort, one of the finest examples of fortification near Washington. The pieces of ordnance are in splendid condition. The men at the guns are soldierly but easy in their attitudes. They are evidently well-drilled crews. The forked pennant of the artillery flies defiantly above the parapet. But there are no longer any Confederates to defy. The nation is again under one flag, as former Confederate leaders proved by leading Union troops to victory in 1898. Fort Whipple was a mile and a half southwest of the Virginia end of the Aqueduct bridge. It was a semi-permanent field work, completely closed, having emplacements for forty-one heavy guns. The gun in the foreground is a 12-pounder smooth-bore, a Napoleon. During four years it has been carefully oiled, its yawning muzzle has been swabbed out with care, and a case has been put over it to keep it from rusting in foul weather. In the case of larger guns, the muzzles were stopped up with tam
l 23, 1904. He became a lecturer at Princeton University, and is the author of several medical works. J. J. Woodward took charge of the pension division of the surgeon-general's office and of the Army Medical Museum, and helped to collect material for the Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion. He attended President Garfield after he was shot. Charles R. Greenleaf was chief surgeon with the army in the field during the Spanish-American War, medical inspector of the army, 1898-99, and chief surgeon, Division of the Philippines. John Shaw Billings was in charge of the Medical Museum and Library in Washington until his retirement from the service in October, 1895. The following year he was appointed director of the New York Public Library, comprising the Astor, Lenox, and Tilden Foundations, which were consolidated. Brevet lieutenant-colonel A. A. Woodhull Brevet lieutenant-colonel J. J. Woodward Brevet major Charles R. Greenleaf Brevet lieutenant-colon
l 23, 1904. He became a lecturer at Princeton University, and is the author of several medical works. J. J. Woodward took charge of the pension division of the surgeon-general's office and of the Army Medical Museum, and helped to collect material for the Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion. He attended President Garfield after he was shot. Charles R. Greenleaf was chief surgeon with the army in the field during the Spanish-American War, medical inspector of the army, 1898-99, and chief surgeon, Division of the Philippines. John Shaw Billings was in charge of the Medical Museum and Library in Washington until his retirement from the service in October, 1895. The following year he was appointed director of the New York Public Library, comprising the Astor, Lenox, and Tilden Foundations, which were consolidated. Brevet lieutenant-colonel A. A. Woodhull Brevet lieutenant-colonel J. J. Woodward Brevet major Charles R. Greenleaf Brevet lieutenant-colon
eroism and sacrifices have bound this people together as they were never bound before. It was, then, no exaggeration for that eminent Mississippian, L. Q. C. Lamar, in his oration at Charleston, the center of secession, at the unveiling of the statue of Calhoun, the apostle of States' rights, to declare that the appeal to arms in 1861 guaranteed and established the indissolubility of the American Union and the universality of American freedom. How true this was proving was demonstrated in 1898 by the War with Spain. That ninety days expedition was more influential than any other one event in drawing North and South into relations of exultant brotherhood. Congress re- Richard Watson Gilder as a cadet of the war days Born in Bordentown, New Jersey, on February 8, 1844, Richard Watson Gilder was educated at Bellvue Seminary, an institution conducted by his father in Flushing, Long Island. At the age of twelve he was publishing a newspaper—a sheet a foot square, entitled The
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