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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 279 279 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 49 49 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 31 31 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 4 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904. You can also browse the collection for 1898 AD or search for 1898 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

e hour when the meeting broke up. Altogether it, also, was a very enjoyable occasion, and one long to be remembered by all so fortunate as to be present. In 1890 the interior of the church was re-decorated, and a general brightening of the auditorium took place, at a cost of about $2,100. In 1891 William P. Mitchell, who had been treasurer for fourteen years, declined a re-election. A. Hodgman was elected to succeed Mr. Mitchell, serving with great credit up to the time of his death in 1898, when Arthur W. Glines became treasurer. At the time of the raising of the grade of Cross street and the putting in place of the present steel bridge by the Boston & Maine railroad, the parish claimed damages to the amount of $4,000. A long legal conflict was the result, the final decision being that the society property was not injured, and therefore no damages could be collected. But it cost the society $720 to find this out. Here, again, the women of the parish contributed,—the Sewing
Rev. David Clark Rev. David Clark, the second pastor of the church, was born in 1832, and came to our society at the age of twenty-seven. His ministry with us began in 1859, and continued but two years, being the shortest pastorate in the society's history. He came to us direct from college, and gained much experience in this, his first field of labor, which was of help in his after lifework in the Christian ministry. He died in 1898.
Rev. L. M. Powers Rev. L. M. Powers, who was the successful pastor of the church from 1892 to 1898, was born in Bethel, Me., March 21, 1864. He was educated in the schools of his native town, and, at the age of fourteen, he decided to enter college. He attended Gould's Academy at Bethel, and after graduating, he entered the Wesleyan Academy at Kent's Hill, Me., with the idea of becoming a Methodist minister. He read the works of Channing and Emerson, and became deeply interested. Early in life he heard Rev. Henry Blanchard preach, and the sermon proved to be the turning point in Mr. Powers' career. He decided to become a member of the Universalist Church and a preacher of its doctrines. He entered Tufts Theological School and took the regular two-years' course, devoting his time to hard study. Lacking the necessary funds to complete his education, he taught school for the purpose of securing money, and a year later obtained a position as city editor of the Atlantic City
death caused a vacancy in the ranks of the faithful workers which was hard to fill, and it is but just his name should appear in this history of the church. At Mr. Powers' suggestion, the church members adopted the individual communion cups in 1898. The Men's Club was also started during the same year. But 1898 will be chiefly remembered as the year in which the old debt was raised, and the parish was able to realize that freedom was to be a reality, and no longer a dream, of the future. 1898 will be chiefly remembered as the year in which the old debt was raised, and the parish was able to realize that freedom was to be a reality, and no longer a dream, of the future. On Sunday morning, March 19, Mr. Powers called for individual pledges to pay the debt. His plan was for quarter-yearly payments, to continue over a term of three years. About $8,500 was pledged that morning, sufficient to take care of the principal and interest up to the end of the three-year period. At the close of his sermon on the first Sunday in October, 1898, Mr. Powers read his resignation. It came without warning. The people could hardly believe their ears. Every effort was made t
Fortier was elected president. He resigned February 4, 1896, and Miss Amy Meserve was elected president. This same year $25 was contributed toward the Social Hall fund. Other presidents have been: Miss Minnie Flagg, 1897; Mrs. Fanny B. Kelly, 1898, January to June; Miss Mabel G. Delano, 1898, July to December; Miss Abbie Southworth, 1899; Miss Mabel Leavitt, 1900; Miss Lottie Draper, 1901; Miss Florence Stacey, 1902; Miss Nellie Quinnell, 1902-3; Miss Dorothea Benson, 1903—4. During the 1898, July to December; Miss Abbie Southworth, 1899; Miss Mabel Leavitt, 1900; Miss Lottie Draper, 1901; Miss Florence Stacey, 1902; Miss Nellie Quinnell, 1902-3; Miss Dorothea Benson, 1903—4. During the fifteen years the society was in existence, the interest in its meetings and the missionary work done both inside and outside the parish was largely due to the efficient committees in charge of the work, and throughout its life it well exemplified its name by its many endeavors for Christ and His chur
. Carvill, L. V. Niles, C. E. Giles. 1897—George Stephens, J. F. Nickerson, A. H. Carvill, L. V. Niles, C. E. Giles. 1898—George Stephens, J. F. Nickerson, A. H. Carvill, L. V. Niles, C. E. Giles. 1899—S. C. Earle, J. F. Nickerson, J. W. Santhe society. 1854 to 1865, Edwin Munroe, Jr. 1865 to 1877, S. W. Fuller. 1877 to 1891, W. P. Mitchell. 1891 to 1898, A. Hodgman. 1898 to 1902, A. W. Glines. 1902, R. Y. Gifford. Clerks of the society. 1854 to 1871, Charles Wil1898 to 1902, A. W. Glines. 1902, R. Y. Gifford. Clerks of the society. 1854 to 1871, Charles Williams. 1871 to 1876, John Hunnewell. 1876 to 1897, P. M. Harwood. 1897, Seth Mason. 1898, H. M. Haven. Collectors of the society. 1854, J. Q. Twombly. 1855 to 1857, James S. Runey. 1858, Aaron Sargent. 1859 to 1862, B. S. Binl. 1876 to 1897, P. M. Harwood. 1897, Seth Mason. 1898, H. M. Haven. Collectors of the society. 1854, J. Q. Twombly. 1855 to 1857, James S. Runey. 1858, Aaron Sargent. 1859 to 1862, B. S. Binney. 1863 to 1864, J. Q. Two