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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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e Hampton, who went to the Army of Tennessee. From 1886 to 1890 he was governor of Virginia, and, under appointment of President Cleveland, consul-general at Havana from 1896 to the outbreak of the Spanish-American War. President McKinley appointed him major-general of volunteers in 1898 and placed him at the head of the Seventh Army Corps. He was made military governor of Havana in 1899. Later, he commanded the Department of the Missouri. He received the rank of brigadier-general in February, 1901, and was retired the following month. He died in Washington, April 28, 1905. Army of Kanawha The Confederate forces assigned to operate in the Kanawha valley, West Virginia, were placed under the command of Brigadier-General John B. Floyd on August 11, 1861, and denominated the Army of the Kanawha. This force and one under Brigadier-General Henry A. Wise were its chief constituents. The troops took part in the engagement at Carnifex Ferry. The strength of the command was about
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bates, John Coalter, 1842- (search)
Bates, John Coalter, 1842- Military officer; born in St. Charles county, Mo., Aug. 26, 1842; educated at Washington University (St. Louis). He entered the army in 1861, and served on the staff of Gen. George G. Meade from the battle of Gettysburg to the close of the war. In 1863-62 he held the rank of captain; in 1882-86 that of lieutenant-colonel: in 1886-92 that of colonel. He was president of the board which devised the present drill and firing regulations, and a member of the board which adopted the Krag-Jorgensen rifle. At the outbreak of the Spanish-American War he was commissioned a brigadier-general of volunteers, and for the Santiago campaign was promoted major-general. In 1899 he was appointed military governor of Cienfuegos, Cuba. On the reorganization of the regular army in February, 1901. he was appointed one of the new brigadier-generals.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bell, James Franklin, 1857- (search)
nts, he attached himself to the staff of General MacArthur, and rendered important service in scouting. On Sept. 9, for most distinguished gallantry in action near Porac. Luzon, President McKinley directed that a congressional medal of honor should be presented to him. On Nov. 12, Colonel Bell took possession of Tarlac, where Aguinaldo had established his headquarters. The following month he was promoted to brigadier-general of volunteers. On the reorganization of the regular army in February, 1901, President McKinley appointed Colonel Bell one of the new brigadier-generals--an act that caused considerable surprise, as this officer was only a captain in the regular army, and was advanced over the heads of more than 1,000 officers who, according to the rules of seniority, would have been entitled to precede him in promotion. General Bell is widely known in the army as a dashing cavalry officer, and when General Otis recommended the presentation of the medal of honor, he said that
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chaffee, Adna Romanza 1842- (search)
service and reappointed a brigadier-general, April 13, 1899. From December, 1898 he served as chief-of-staff to the governor-general of Cuba. He had command of the troops which captured El Caney, and practically closed the Santiago campaign. On May 8, 1899, he was promoted to colonel of the 8th Cavalry, and July 19, 1900, was assigned to command the American troops with the allied armies in China, with the rank of major-general of volunteers. He took an active part in the advance on Peking and in the establishment of order after the capture of the city. After the looting of the ancient Imperial Observatory, in Peking, General Chaffee addressed a strong protest against this and similar depredations to Count von Waldersee, the commander-in-chief of the allied troops. On the reorganization of the regular army, in February, 1901, he was appointed majorgeneral. On June 19, 1901, the President appointed him commander of the military division of the Philippines and military governor.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Daughters of the American Revolution, (search)
Daughters of the American Revolution, A society organized in Washington, D. C., Oct. 11, 1890. All women above eighteen years of age who are descended from patriots, soldiers, sailors, or civil officers who supported the cause of independence, are eligible to membership. In 1900 there were 492 State chapters in fourteen States and Territories, in the District of Columbia, and in Hawaii, with a total membership of about 27,000. The president-general was Mrs. Daniel Manning; recording secretary-general, Mrs. Albert Ackers, Nashville, Tenn. At the annual national convention in Washington in February, 1901, the membership was reported at 35,092, and Mrs. Charles W. Fairbanks, of Indiana, was elected president-general, and Mrs. E. W. Howard, of Virginia, recording secretary-general.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Davis, George Whitefield, 1839- (search)
termaster in May, 1865; and was mustered out of the service, April 20, 1866. On Jan. 22, 1867, he was appointed captain in the 14th United States Infantry; in 1894 was promoted to major of the 11th Infantry; in 1897 transferred to the 9th Infantry; and in 1898 promoted to lieutenant-colonel of the 14th Infantry. At the beginning of the war with Spain he was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers; was honorably discharged under that commission and reappointed to the same rank, April 14, 1899. On Oct. 19, 1899, he was Brig.-Gen. George Whitefield Davis. promoted to colonel of the 23d United States Infantry; and on the reorganization of the regular army, in February, 1901, he was appointed one of the new brigadier-generals. He was for several years a member of the board on Public War Records; commanded a division in the early part of the war with Spain; subsequently was on detached service in Pinar del Rio, Cuba, and in May, 1899, was appointed governorgeneral of Porto Rico.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grant, Frederick Dent 1850- (search)
to Austria-Hungary, where he remained till 1893. He was a police commissioner in New York City through the administration of Mayor Strong. In 1898, on the call for volunteers for the war with Spain, Colonel Grant offered his services to the President, and went to the front as colonel of the 14th New York regiment. On May 27 he was appointed a brigadier-general of volunteers; served in the Porto Rico campaign; and after the war was appointed commander of the military district of San Juan. While holding this post he organized an effective police force for the city similar in plan to that of New York City. Subsequently he was ordered to the Philippine Islands, where he rendered such valuable service in operations against the insurgents, and also as an administrative officer, that on the reorganization of the regular army in February, 1901, President McKinley appointed him one of the new brigadiergenerals, he being then the only officer not in the regular army appointed to that rank.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hall, Robert Henry 1837- (search)
ry 1837- Military officer; born in Detroit, Mich., Nov. 15, 1837; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1860; was promoted to second and first lieutenant of the 10th Infantry in 1861; captain in 1863; major of the 22d Infantry in 1883; lieutenantcolonel of the 6th Infantry in 1888; and colonel of the 4th Infantry, May 18, 1893. In the volunteer service he was appointed a brigadier-general May 27, 1898; was honorably discharged under that commission and reappointed to the same rank April 15, 1899; and on the reorganization of the regular army in February, 1901, he was appointed one of the new brigadiergenerals. During the Civil War he served or the frontier; in the Rappahannock campaign; in the operations about Chattanooga; and in the action at Weldon, Va., where he was wounded. In 1865-71 he was again on frontier duty, and in 1871-78 was on duty at the United States Military Academy. For some time prior to his last promotion he was on duty in the Philippine Islands.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hughes, Robert P. 1839- (search)
te in the 12th Pennsylvania Infantry, April 25, 1861; became captain in the 85th Pennsylvania Infantry, May 20, 1862; lieutenant-colonel of the 199th Pennsylvania Infantry, Dec. 7, 1864; was brevetted colonel, April 2, 1865; and mustered out of the service, June 28, following. On July 28, 1866, he was commissioned a captain in the 18th United States Infantry; in 1870 was assigned to the 3d United States Infantry; in 1886 became major and inspector-general; and on Aug. 31, 1888, colonel and inspector-general. At the beginning of the war with Spain he was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers; was honorably discharged under that commission, and reappointed to the same rank, April 16, 1899; and on the reorganization of the regular army in February, 1901, he was appointed one of the new brigadier-generals. His later service has been in the Philippine Islands, where he was particularly effective in clearing the Province of Iloilo of insurgents in the latter part of December, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Iron and steel. (search)
the iron and steel trade above indicated contributed to make the A modern blast-furnace. United States, in the opening of the twentieth century, the world's greatest producer of iron, steel, coal, copper, cotton, breadstuffs, provisions, and many other articles entering the daily requirements of man. If any further evidence was required to indicate the supremacy of the United States in the allied iron and steel industries, the gigantic United States Steel Corporation, organized in February, 1901, by a pooling of the interests of more than a dozen great operating companies, known on the street as the billion-dollar steel combine, would probably be sufficient to satisfy any doubt. Each of the corporations in the new concern was widely known for the large capital it commanded and the vast amount of work it had already accomplished, and the possibilities open to consummation by a combination of these great concerns became a matter entirely beyond the range of human calculation.
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