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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 11 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. 10 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 5 5 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 5 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 5 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 4 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1903 AD or search for 1903 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Complete roster of Trustees, 1875-1903. (search)
Complete roster of Trustees, 1875-1903. The five original trustees were elected 22d May, 1875—General James Conner, Captain Wm. A. Courtenay, Lieutenant Oct. Wilkie, Lieutenant Henry I. Greer, F. L. Parker, M. D. General Conner was elected Chairman; Lieutenant Wilkie, Treasurer; Lieutenant Greer, Secretary. On 20th March, 1883, General Conner resigned on account of ill health; died in Richmond, Va., 27th June, 1883. Major R. C. Gilchrist was elected by the company a trustee in his place. Every New Year's Day the permanent annuity of $30 is issued, with four coupons, payable quarterly. These sums, and the current calls for temporary assistance—sickness, funeral expenses, &c., &c.—foot up, since 1875, including this fiscal year of 1903, $26,52.000. The principal of the fund is now $17,000, in 5 per cent substantial securities, yielding $850 annually for twenty years to come. The previous investments had yielded 6 per cent. and 7 per cent. interest on less capital. I append a<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Robert Edward Lee. (search)
As illustrative of the real state of intelligent Northern sentiment may be cited the words of Dr. Albert Shaw, the editor of the Review of Reviews, who speaks for a large clientele of educated and conservative Northerners, and says in the June (1903) number of that well known periodical: The recent session of the Virginia Legislature which made the appropriation to the Jamestown Exposition had been in session a long time, by reason of an extraordinary amount of business, necessitated bypon Lee in Richmond, and his words were warmly endorsed by Mr. Hamilton W. Mabie and Dr. Lyman Abbott, the editors of The Outlook, and other prominent Northern men in attendance upon the Southern Educational Conference. In its issue of July 11 (1903), The Outlook said editorially: It is hardly possible that any man in the North could have gone through the spiritual struggle that Robert E. Lee went through during the days when war was threatened. In the North those men that wavered were c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), New Market day at V. M. I. [from the Richmond, Va., times-dispatch, June 24, 1903. (search)
d. The report was adopted, and then Captain Walker suggested that the alumni, exclusive of the New Market Battalion, present the crosses, and also that the association be photographed in a body. The Chair announced the following committee to arrange for the purchase of the crosses: Joseph R. Anderson, W. E. Cutshaw and John B. Purcell. After some discussion it was agreed that the cost of the crosses should be met by voluntary contributions. On motion of Colonel Purcell, the class of 1903 was elected to membership in the association. Mr. Anderson read a letter received from Dr. George W. Williams, of Farmington, Mo., class of 43, regretting that he could not be present, and also one from his wife, asking that some loving message be sent him, as he is now eighty-four years old and too feeble to attend the reunion. He is thought to be the oldest living cadet. A committee was directed to write a suitable letter to Dr. Williams and his wife. In response to the motion of Dr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
Pickett's charge. [from the Richmond, Va., times-dispatch, February 7, 1904.] The story of it as told by a member of his staff. Captain Robert A. Bright. Statement as to where the General was during the Charge.—Why the attack failed. The following statement of what I saw and heard on the third day at Gettysburg was in the main written about thirty years ago, and was rewritten for publication in 1903, but the issue of it was prevented until now by an attack of gout, from which I suffered. I earnestly wish that it had come out before the death of my corps commander, the brave General Longstreet. Early in the morning Pickett's Virginians, forty-seven hundred muskets, with officers added, five thousand strong, moved from the camping ground of the second day, two miles in rear, to the battlefield, and took position behind the hill from which we charged later in the day. Then came the order from headquaaters: Colonel E. P. Alexander will command the entire artillery in