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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 14 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. 6 6 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. 4 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 3 3 Browse Search
Plato, Republic 2 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. 2 2 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. 2 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. 1 1 Browse Search
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Plato, Republic, Book 6, section 488e (search)
with or without the consent of others, or any possibility of mastering this alleged artThe translation gives the right meaning. Cf. 518 D, and the examples collected in my emendation of Gorgias 503 D in Class. Phil. x. (1915) 325-326. The contrast between subjects which do and those which do not admit of constitution as an art and science is ever present to Plato's mind, as appears from the Sophist, Politicus, Gorgias, and Phaedrus. And he would normally express the idea by a genitive with TE/XNH. Cf. Protag. 357 A, Phaedrus 260 E, also Class. Rev. xx. (1906) p. 247. See too Cic.De or.I. 4 “neque aliquod praeceptum artis
Plato, Republic, Book 9, section 571e (search)
nor indulged to repletion his appetitive part, so that it may be lulled to sleepCf. Browning, Bishop Blougram's Apology, “And body gets its sop and holds its noise.” Plato was no ascetic, as some have inferred from passages in the Republic, Laws, Gorgias, and Phaedo. Cf. Herbert L. Stewart, “Was Plato an Ascetic?”Philos. Re., 1915, pp. 603-613; Dean Inge, Christian Ethics, p. 90: “The asceticism of the true Platonist has always been sane moderate; the hallmark of Platonism is a combination of self-restraint and simplicity with humanism.”
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
on University. 29 September, 1762, while there is evidence of dramatic interest at Harvard College if not dramatic authorship as early as 1758. Matthews, Albert, Early plays at Harvard, nation, vol. XCVIII, no. 2542, p. 395, 19 March, 1914. Of more direct influence, however, on early dramatic writing, were the performances of plays by the company under David Douglass. There seem to have been theatrical performances in this country since 1703, Sonneck, O. G., Early opera in America, 1915, p. 7. See also, for the beginning of theatrical companies, Daly, Charles P., When was the drama introduced in America? 1864, reprinted in Dunlap Soc. Pub., Ser. 2, vol. I, 1896; Ford, P. L., Washington and the Theatre, Dunlap Society Pub., Ser. 2, vol. VIII, 1899. For earlier performances by amateurs, see Bruce, P. A., An early Virginia play, nation, vol. LXXXVIII, no. 2276, p. 136, II Feb., 1909, and Neidig, W. J., The First Play in America, Nation, vol. LXXXVIII, no. 2274, p. 86, 28 J
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: the New South: Lanier (search)
ll over the South. His continued popularity proves that his sentiment was not merely a device for moving an audience but was the outpouring of Grady's real nature, full of quick sympathy and unfathomed tenderness. In character and disposition Grady belonged with the Old South; in vision and purpose he was the herald of the New. No account of the New South in literature would be complete without notice of the life and writings of Booker T. Washington See also Book III, Chap. V. (1859-1915). He was not only a product of Reconstruction but he contributed much to the progress and prosperity of his section in the new era. Born two or three years before the war on a Virginia plantation, his mother a slave, his father he knew not who, he a few years after the war joined in that rush for an education which seized great numbers of the freedmen. The acuteness of that struggle, the inspiring tenacity with which it was maintained, form one of the bright pages in that dark period. When
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: dialect writers (search)
of the writer of the Uncle Remus stories, near Atlanta, and to convert it into a suitable memorial. This has now been done. The significance of Uncle Remus as a study in negro character can best be understood by a comparison of Harris's work with that of others, especially his predecessors, in the same field. The negroes themselves, by the way, can show an orator, two prose-writers, and one poet of merited eminence. These are Frederick Douglass (1817-95); Booker T. Washington (c. 1859-1915); W. E. Burghardt DuBois, and Paul Lawrence Dunbar (1872-1906). Up from slavery (1900) by Washington and The souls of black Folk (1903) by DuBois are works of almost diametrically opposite styles. The former makes its appeal by its simplicity and restraint; the latter by its emotionalism, its note of lyric intensity. Neither author, however, is of unmixed negro blood, and neither has come as close to the heart of his race as did Dunbar, a pure negro, in his Lyrics of lowly life (1896). He w
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
which the art of making marketable stories may be learned through the mails. In America the short story seems to have become an obsession. The demand of the decade has been for stories with a punch. The material must be out of the ordinary; it must not only breathe the breath of unfamiliar regions but it must give the impression that it is a bit of autobiography, or at least a section of life that has passed under the author's own eyes. The short story work of F. Hopkinson Smith (1838– 1915) See also Book III, Chap. XI. may be taken as an illustration. There is in it the breath of foreign parts, the sense of cosmopolitanism, breezy knowledge of the world. Everywhere alertness, wideawakeness, efficiency, in an easy colloquial style of narrative that has about it a businesslike ring. His brilliant narratives in such a collection as At close range are the work of one who would have made a most efficient special reporter for a city daily. Here are modem instances in all par
that I could read just as if it were spoken for the first time. The first impulse kept him close to the wholesome Hoosier soil. The second is an anticipation of Robert Frost's theory of speech tones as the basis of verse, as well as a revival of the bardic practice of reciting one's own poems. For Riley had much of the actor and platform-artist in him, and comprehended that poetry might be made again a spoken art, directed to the ear rather than to the eye. His vogue, which at his death in 1915 far surpassed that of any living American poet, is inexplicable to those persons only who forget the sentimental traditions of our American literature and its frank appeal to the emotions of juvenility, actual and recollected. Riley's best holt as a poet was his memory of his own boyhood and his perception that the childmind lingers in every adult reader. Genius has often been called the gift of prolonged adolescence, and in this sense, surely, there was genius in the warm and gentle heart
e (1903), W. C. Bronson, A short history of American literature (1903), with an excellent bibliography, W. B. Cairns, History of American literature (1912), W. P. Trent and J. Erskine, Great American writers (1912), and W. Riley, American thought (1915). The most recent and authoritative account is to be found in The Cambridge history of American literature, 3 volumes edited by Trent, Erskine, Sherman, and Van Doren. The best collection of American prose and verse is E. C. Stedman and E. M. HW. Emerson, Works, 12 volumes (Centenary edition, 1903), Journal, 10 volumes (1909-1914), his Life by J. E. Cabot, 2 volumes (1887), by R. Garnett (1887), by G. E. Woodberry (1905); see also Ralph Waldo Emerson, a critical study by O. W. Firkins (1915). H. D. Thoreau, Works, 20 volumes (Walden edition including Journals, 1906), Life by F. B. Sanborn (1917), also Thoreau, a critical study by Mark van Doren (1916). Note also Lindsay Swift, Brook Farm (1900), and The Dial, reprint by the Rowfant C
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
y parts of the country celebrated Riley Day; by 1915 he was honoured by official recognition, the Se this massacre in Waiilatpu, Its rise and fall (1915). The captives were rescued by the skill andd two of them, Charles Francis Adams, Jr. (1835-1915) and Henry Adams (1838– 1918), fall within the or faith as a part of a complete cosmic system (1915), rejoices in the breadth of view and the bounds to be found in his Genetic theory of reality (1915), in which he develops this theory of pancalismoving picture, The birth of a nation (New York, 1915). Though Ridgely Torrence, in a series of one-aMay, 1885), and after his brother Charles (1860-1915) had opened the Empire Theatre (in January, 189wn plays. The fact is that Charles Klein (1867-1915), from the moment he stopped writing librettos d years, the centenary of the North American in 1915 attracted much attention. The other New Englf economics (1911), Investors and money Makers (1915), and a series of collected essays on the tarif[4 more...]
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: divers good causes 1890-1896; aet. 71-77 (search)
, Edward L. Pierce, Frank B. Sanborn, Annie Fields, E. Benjamin Andrews, Lillie B. Chace Wyman, Samuel L. Clemens, and Joseph H. Twitchell. James Russell Lowell, writing to Francis J. Garrison in 1891, says: Between mote and beam, I think this time Russia has the latter in her eye, though God knows we have motes enough in ours. So you may take my name even if it be in vain, as I think it will be. It was through this society that she made the acquaintance of Mme. Breschkovskaya, Now (1915) a political prisoner in Siberia: she escaped, but was recaptured and later removed to a more remote place of imprisonment. the Russian patriot whose sufferings and sacrifices have endeared her to all lovers of freedom. The two women felt instant sympathy with each other. Mme. Breschkovskaya came to 241 Beacon Street more than once, and they had much talk together. On one of these occasions our mother was asked to play some of her own compositions. Her fingers strayed from one thing to a
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