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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
Plato, Republic 3 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. 3 3 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 1 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. 1 1 Browse Search
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Plato, Republic, Book 5, section 477c (search)
“Shall we say that faculties,The history of the word DU/NAMIS has been studied in recent monographs and its various meanings, from potentiality to active power, discriminated. Cf. J. Souilhé, Etude sur le terme DU/NAMIS dans les Dialogues de Platon, Paris, 1919, pp. 96, 163 ff. But Plato makes his simple meaning here quite plain, and it would be irrelevant to bring in modern denunciations of the “old faculty psychology.” powers, abilities are a class of entities by virtue of which we and all other things are able to do what we or they are able to do? I mean that sight and hearing, for example, are faculties, if so be that you un
Plato, Republic, Book 7, section 515b (search)
e?” “And again, would not the same be true of the objects carried past them?” “Surely.” “If then they were able to talk to one another, do you not think that they would suppose that in naming the things that they sawCf. Parmen. 130 c, Tim. 51 B, 52 A, and my De Platonis Idearum doctrina, pp. 24-25; also E. Hoffmann in Wochenschrift f. klass. Phil. xxxvi. (1919) pp. 196-197. As we use the word tree of the trees we see, though the reality (AU)TO\ O(\ E)/STI) is the idea of a tree, so they would speak of the shadows as the world, though the real reference unknown to them would be to the objects that cause the shadows, and back of the objects to the things of the “real” world of which they are copies. The general
Plato, Republic, Book 10, section 609d (search)
me, then, and consider the soul in the same way.The argument that follows is strictly speaking a fallacy in that it confounds the soul with the physical principle of life. Cf. on 35 C and on 352 E, Gorg. 477 B-C, and supra,Introd. p. lxvii. But Dean Inge, “Platonism and Human Immortality” (Aristot. Soc., 1919, p. 288) says: “Plato's argument, in the tenth book of the Republic, for the immortality of the soul, has found a place in scholastic theology, but is supposed to have been discredited by Kant. I venture to think that his argument, that the soul can only be destroyed by an enemy (so to speak)in pari materia, is sound. Physical evils, <
Strabo, Geography, Book 9, chapter 3 (search)
Nome has been ascribed to Sacadas (Pollux 4.77), who was victorious with the flute at the Pythian Games about three hundred years before the time of Timosthenes (Paus. 6.14.9, 10.7.4), Guhrauer (Jahrb. für Class. Philol., Suppl. 8, 1875-1876, pp. 311—351 makes a strong argument for a lacuna in the Greek text, and for making Strabo say that the melody was composed by Sacadas and later merely described by Timosthenes in one of his numerous works. Cp. also H. Riemann, Handb. der Musikgeschichte 1919, vol. i, pp. 63-65. and through this melody he means to celebrate the contest between Apollo and the dragon, setting forth the prelude as anakrousis, the first onset of the contest as ampeira, the contest itself as katakeleusmos, the triumph following the victory as iambus and dactylus, the rhythms being in two measures, one of which, the dactyl, is appropriate to hymns of praise, whereas the other, the iamb, is suited to reproaches (compare the word "iambize"), and the expiration of the dra
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
this female doctor had great confidence she could cure him. She was attired in a small straw hat with a cockade in front, a pair of blue pantaloons and a long frock coat, or sack. Over all she had a linen duster ; and this, coupled with the fact that she had rips in her boots, gave her a trig appearance. She was liberal in her advice to all comers and especially exhorted two newspaper boys to immediately wash their faces, in which remark she was clearly correct. Dr. Mary E. Walker (1832-1919). . . . . . . At Warrenton Junction there was luckily an ambulance from headquarters; and as its owner was only a diminutive captain, I had no hesitation in asking him to carry me up, with my traps. . . . So off we set, on a road which went sometimes over stumps and sometimes through runs two or three feet deep. We passed any quantity of pickets and negroes and dragoons in twos and threes; till at last, looking off to the left (or rather right), I beheld what seemed a preparation for a giga
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
any treatment of those still alive and active, is that at this date (1919) it does not seem that Santayana's future career will belong to Amer of the theatre. It will later be seen that this break — up is now (1919) in process. The only manager who, early in the nineties, seems this critical attitude is behind the secession which is going on now (1919) in the theatre. Drama groups all through the country have sprung ued had had its day. The latest venture, The Unpartizan Review (until 1919 the Unpopular Review), established in 1914 by Henry Holt and Companyond. Henry M. Alden, his successor, was editor for fifty years (1869-1919). Fletcher Harper, a member of the firm, habitually contracted for t (1904). A more original mind was the astronomer Simon Newcomb (1835-1919), who after devoting some attention to financial policy made his chidecidedly inferior nature. The Jewish Art Theatre, established in 1919, bids fair to make an important contribution of a higher sort. A
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the first conflict. (search)
alry which received a uniform designation a sixth was added; the number of artillery regiments was increased from four to five, and that of the infantry regiments from ten to nineteen. These eleven new regiments were much stronger numerically than the old ones: the Sixth Cavalry, raised to twelve squadrons, numbered 1189 officers and men; the Fifth Artillery, also divided into twelve batteries of six field-pieces each, commanded by twelve captains and three majors, comprised a total force of 1919 men. Finally, instead of a single battalion of ten companies, the new infantry regiments were composed of three battalions of eight companies each, and their effective force, as regulated by law, was 2452 men. These new regiments, having once received their full complement, added 25,000 men to the regular army, and thus made up the total of 42,000 men fixed by the law of July 29th. But it was so difficult to obtain recruits that in December, 1861, when the enlistment of volunteers had re
A League of Nations. Shall we have a League of Nations, To uphold the cause of right? Shall we have a League of Nations, To efface the sway of might? Shall we have a League of Nations, Peace and justice to instill? With one accord the whole world answers, A League of Nations? Yes, we will! We will! We will! Shall we have a League of Nations, Save for home, our boys, our men? Shall we have a League of Nations, Sheathe the sword, and wield the pen? Shall we have a League of Nations, Arbitrate, and cease to kill? With one accord the whole world answers, ‘A League of Nations? Yes, we will! We will! We will!’ Shall we have a League of Nations, To protect the great and small? Shall we have a League of Nations, All for one, and one for all? Shall we have a League of Nations, Cherished ideals to fulfill? With one accord the whole world answers, A League of Nations? Yes, we will! We will! We will! Copyright, 1919, Edith Rojean O
Medford Historical Society Officers for year 1919. President. Moses Whitcher Mann. Vice-Presidents. Rosewell B. Lawrence. Herbert N. Ackerman. Miss lily B. Atherton. Miss Agnes W. Lincoln. Corresponding Secretary and treasurer. George S. T. Fuller. Recording Secretary. Miss Jessie M. Dinsmore. Curator and librarian George H. Remele Directors William Leaven J. A.C. Emerson Melvin W. Pierce Standing Committees. Publication Moses W. Mann. Miss Helen T. Wild. Miss Eliza M. Gill C. W. M. Blanchard Frederic Dole Membership. H. N. Ackerman. Edward M. Peters. Miss Elizabeth R. Carty. Mrs. Ella J. Fuller. Abner H. Barker. Mrs. H. A. C. Scott. William Leavens. J. A. C. Emerson. Andrew F. Curtin. E. Earl Blakely. Miss Annie E. Durgin. Mrs. Lester H. Williams. Miss Annie P. Danforth. Frank S. Gilkey. Percy W. Richardson. Papers and Addresses. George H. Remele. Moses W. Mann. Miss Annie E. Durgin. J.
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22., Medford a century ago—1819. (search)
ing plant for $20.00! But how about $200 for Parson Osgood's supply of wood for the same year, deducted from the $500 salary? Even with the high price of coal in 1919, the average householder today would deem it a hardship to pay $200 for a year's fuel, to say nothing of spending two-fifths of his income for warmth. Seth Mayoabstract covering features of the town administration of 1819. We may read between the lines and contrast the Medford of that day and its conditions with those of 1919. One thing will stand out noticeably, the disproportionate burden that Medford was bearing then in the support of its poor—and we may well ask the cause. That illtions. But the item of the relief of the poor had fallen to about one-seventh, and who can say but that the service and relief was as efficient? There is much of interest in the study of the old statistics. It is not our intention here to compare them with those of 1919, but it is pertinent to inquire whither we are tendin
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