hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 3 3 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 316 AD or search for 316 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

es VI.--A. D. 198. Chosroes or Khosrew I., surnamed Medz, or the Great, the (fabulous) conqueror (overrunner) of Asia Minor; murdered by the Arsacid Anag, who was the father of St. Gregory, the apostle of Armenia.--A. D. 232. Ardashir or Artaxerxes, the first Sassanid of Persia.--A. D. 259. Dertad or Tiridates II., surnamed Medz, the son of Chosroes, established by the Romans.--A. D. 314. Interregnum. Sanadrug seizes northern Armenia, and Pagur southern Armenia, but only for a short time.--A. D. 316. Chosroes or Khosrew II., surnamed P'hok'hr, or " the Little," the son of Tiridates Mezd.--A. D. 325. Diran or Tiranus I., his son.--A. D. 341. Arsaces or Arshag III., his son. --A. D. 370. Bab or Para.--A. D. 377. Waraztad, usurper.--A. D. 382. Arsaces IV. (and Valarsaces or Wagharshag II., his brother).--A. D. 387. Armenia divided.--A. D. 389. Arsaces IV. dies. Cazavon in Roman Armenia, Chosroes or Khosrew III. in Persarmenia.--A. D. 392. Bahram Shapur (Sapor), the brother of Chosroes I
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Constanti'nus Ii. Fla'vius Clau'dius surnamed the Younger, Roman emperor, A. D. 337-340, the second son of Constantine the Great, and the first whom he had by his second wife, Fausta, was born at Arelatum, now Aries, in Gaul, on the 7th of August, A. D. 312. As early as A. D. 316, he was created Caesar, together with nis elder brother, Crispus, and the younger Licinius, and he held the consulship several times. In commemoration of the fifth anniversary of his Caesarship, in 321, the orator Nazarius delivered a panegyric (Panegyr. Veter. ix.), which, however, is of little importance. In 335 he was entrusted with the administration of Gaul, Britain, and Spain. After the death of his father, 337, he received in the division of the empire between the three sons of the Great Constantine and his nephews, Dalmatius and Hannibalianus, the same provinces which he had governed under his father, and a part of Africa. Being the eldest surviving son of Constantine, he received some exterior marks
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Hilaria'nus, Meci'lius or MECHI'LIUS or MECIILIA'NUS. The Codex Theodosianus contains frequent notice of this magistrate, who appears to have been Corrector Lucaniae et Bruttiorum under Constantine the Great, A. D. 316 (12. tit. 1. s. 3), proconsul of Africa in the same reign, A. D. 324 (12. tit. 1. s. 9), consul with Pacatianus, A. D. 332, and praefectus praetorio, or, as Gothofredus thinks, praefectus urbi, sc. Romae, under the sons of Constantine, A. D. 339 (6. tit. 4. s. 3, 4, 7). An Hilarian appears, but without any note of his office, in a law of A. D. 341. This is probably Mecilius Hilarian; but the Hilarianus or Hilarius (if indeed he be one person) who appears in the laws of the time of Gratian and Valentinian II., and of Honorius, as praefectus urbi, A. D. 383, and as praefectus praetorio, A. D. 396, must have been a different person. Perhaps the last is the Hilarius mentioned by Symmachus. (Symmachus, Epist. lib. 2.80, 3.38, 42, ed. Paris, 1604; Gothofred. Prosop. Cod. The