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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 8 8 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, BASILICA AEMILIA BASILICA PAULI (search)
more steps led to the forum level. The shrine of VENUS CLOACINA (q.v.) was built at the foot of the steps, not far from the north-west end. The steps on the south-east side have recently been exposed at one point, which has rendered it possible to determine the length of the building. At the beginning of the fifth century A.D. the wooden roofs of the nave and aisles were set on fire (perhaps in 410, when Alaric captured Rome) and numerous coins, from the time of Constantine to the end of the fourth century, were found on the marble pavement. Above the stratum of ashes is a layer, about 1 metre thick, of earth mixed with fragments of architecture, statues, bricks, pottery, etc.; and upon this stratum has fallen the brick wall which replaced the back wall of the tabernae after its destruction by fire. From this it is clear that the nave of the basilica was abandoned after the fire (from which, as the fragments show, the africano columns suffered especially) and was to a certain extent
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, CLIVUS PULLIUS (search)
CLIVUS PULLIUS a street running south from the Subura across the western end of the Oppius to the Fagutal (Sol. i. 26; Varro, LL v. 158), passing the point now occupied by the church of S. Pietro in Vincoli. An inscription of the end of the fourth century (CIL vi. 31893; BC 1891, 354-355) was found here which mentioned the clivumpullenses, and until the end of the sixteenth century the line of the street was marked by the church of S. Giovanni in Carapullo or in clivo Plumbeo (HJ 257; BC 1907, 180; HCh 271).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, IOHANNES ET PAULUS, DOMUS (search)
s who suffered martyrdom under Julian) were murdered, situated on the Caelian just south-west of the porticus Claudia, in the present Via di SS. Giovanni e Paolo (perhaps the CLIVUS SCAURI, q.v.), under the church of that name. The excavations show a private dwelling of the second century, enlarged and rebuilt in the third and fourth, in which, probably in the second half of the third century, a titulus was instituted (titulus Byzantis), while Pammachius founded the basilica at the end of the fourth century. The enlargement consisted for the most part in connecting two houses that had been separated by a narrow street. Upwards of thirty rooms have been opened up, among them a cavaedium, with five rows of three rooms each on the south side, bathrooms, storerooms and stairways. The discovery of an interesting Pagan painting with a marine scene in 1909 may be noticed. The house had three stories, traces of which are visible, and an arcade in front, with two rows of windows above. The fac
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, MACELLUM MAGNUM (search)
AGNUM the market house on the Caelian (Not. Reg. II; CIL vi. 1648, 9183) which Nero built and dedicated in 59 A.D. (Cass. Dio lxii. 18), perhaps on the site of the present church of S. Stefano Rotondo. It is represented on coins of the period (Cohen, Nero 126-130; BM. Nero 191-197, 335-337) as a circular building of two stories, with a central tholos or domed structure surrounded by colonnades. This is generally thought to have been destroyed at some later date and rebuilt at the end of the fourth century for public use, perhaps again as a market. Lugli (ZA 147) follows Profumo's idea (Incendio Neroniano, 673-694) that the original circular building was the famous coenatio rotunda of the DOMUS AUREA (q.v.); but this has nothing to recommend it. Rivoira (RA 79-81) was unable to see anything above ground that showed the remotest indication of work of the time of Nero. It was transformed into the church of S. Stefano by Pope Simplicius (468-482); and restored with various changes by T
. Hist. Ecc. 2.33; Paullin. Mediol. Vita Ambros. 100.26, 31, in Galland. Bibl. Patr. vol. ix.; Cod. Theod. 1. tit. 1. s. 2; 3. tit. 1. s. 6; 7. tit. 18. s. 8; 9. tit. 28. s. 2; and tit. 40. s. 13; 10. tit. 10. s. 20; 11. tit. 39. s. 11; 16. tit. 7. s. 4, 5; Gothofred. Prosop. Cod. Theod.; Tillemont, Hist. des Emp. vol. v.) Flavia'nus 7. Proconsul of Asia, A. D. 383, one of the Flaviani of Symmachus, and apparently the son of No. 6. Either he or his father was praefect of the city (Rome) A. D. 399, and was sent by Honorius (A. D. 414) into Africa to hear the complaints of the Provincials, and examine how far they were well-founded. Fabricius regards this proconsul of Asia as the Flavian of Himerius; but see Nos. 4 and 5. (Cod. Theod. 12. tit. 6. s. 18; Gothofred and Tillemont, as above.) An inscription in Gruter, 170.5, speaks of "Vir inlustris Flavianus" as the founder of a secretarium for the senate, which was destroyed by fire, and restored in the time of Honorius and Theodosiu
Flavia'nus 7. Proconsul of Asia, A. D. 383, one of the Flaviani of Symmachus, and apparently the son of No. 6. Either he or his father was praefect of the city (Rome) A. D. 399, and was sent by Honorius (A. D. 414) into Africa to hear the complaints of the Provincials, and examine how far they were well-founded. Fabricius regards this proconsul of Asia as the Flavian of Himerius; but see Nos. 4 and 5. (Cod. Theod. 12. tit. 6. s. 18; Gothofred and Tillemont, as above.) An inscription in Gruter, 170.5, speaks of "Vir inlustris Flavianus" as the founder of a secretarium for the senate, which was destroyed by fire, and restored in the time of Honorius and Theodosius II. The inscription possibly refers to No. 6, or No. 7.
areia in Cappadocia, for whose son he had, by his interest, procured a high military appointment at court. Ambrose, hearing of his appointment, wrote to Nectarius, bishop of Constantinople (who held that see front A. D. 381 to 397) to depose Gerontius, and so prevent the continuance of so glaring a violation of all ecclesiastical order. Nectarius, however, could effect nothing; but when Chrysostom, two years after his accession to the patriarchate, visited the Asiatic part of his province (A. D. 399), Gerontius was deposed. The people of Nicomedeia, to whom his kindness and attention, shown alike to rich and poor, and the benefits of his medical skill, for which he was eminent, had endeared him, refused to acknowledge his successor, Pansophius, and went about the streets of Nicomedeia and of Constantinople, singing hymns and praying for the restoration of Gerontius. They served to swell the number of the enemies of Chrysostom; and in the synod of the Oak (A. D. 403), Gerontius appeare
be led to conclude that he was a Greek. From the personages whom he introduces in the Saturnalia, and represents as his contemporaries, we are entitled to conclude that he lived about the beginning of the fifth century, but of his personal history or of the social position which he occupied we know absolutely nothing. In the Codex Theodosianus, it is true, a law of Constantine, belonging to the year A. D. 326, is preserved, addressed to a certain Maximianus Macrobius, another of Honorius (A. D. 399) addressed to Macrobius, propraefect of the Spains, another of Arcadius and Honorius (A. D. 400), addressed to Vincentius, praetorian praefect of the Gauls, in which mention is made of a Macrobius as Vicarius; another of Honorius (A. D. 410), addressed to Macrobius, proconsul of Africa; and a rescript of Honorius and Theodosius (A. D. 422), addressed to Florentius, praefect of the city, in which it is set forth, that in consideration of the merits of Macrobius (styled Vir illustris), the o
nor the name of his bishopric, but intimates that it was the occasion of great trouble to him, so that, "while hidden for eleven months in a gloomy cell," he remembered a prophecy of the holy recluse, Joannes of Lycopolis, who, three years before Palladius was taken ill and sent to Alexandria, had foretold both his elevation to the episcopacy and his consequent troubles. As he was present with Evagrius of Pontus, about the time of his death (100.86, Bibl. Pair.), which probably occurred in A. D. 399 [EVAGRIUS, No. 4], he could not have left Egypt till that year, nor can we well place his ordination as bishop before A. D. 400. All the foregoing particulars relate to the author of the Lausiac History, from the pages of which the notices of them are gleaned. Now we learn from Photius (Biblioth. Cod. 57), that in the Synod "of the Oak," at which Joannes or John Chrysostom was condemned [CHRYSOSTOMUS], and which was held in A. D. 403, one of the charges against him related to the ordinat
Pulche'ria (*Poulxeri/a), co-empress and empress of the East, A. D. 414-453, was the eldest daughter of the emperor Arcadius, who died in A. D. 414, and was succeeded by his son Theodosius the Younger. But as this prince was then only fourteen years old, Pulcheria took the reins of government in his stead, although she too had scarcely passed the limits of childhood, being born in A. D. 399. She was created Augusta on the 4th of July, 414, and henceforth reigned in the name of her weak brother with the consent and to the satisfaction of the senate and the people. The historical and political part of her reign is, however, more properly told in the life of THEODOSIUS Il., and we shall consequently only relate such facts as are more particularly connected with the person and character of this extraordinary woman. Immediately after her accession she took the veil, together with her younger sisters Arcadia and Marina, the latter probably against their will, but Pulcheria decidedly from p
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