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The Daily Dispatch: April 14, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 24, 1860., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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ame firm; Ann Murphy, stealing on the 16th of March $30 in C. S. notes of John White; Thomas Samanni, (a free white person, in conjunction with others,) on the 2d of April, feloniously destroying the property of Minna Schweitzer; Thomas Samanni, robbing Schweitzer's store of $200 in dry goods on the 2d day of April; Sarah Clampion2d day of April; Sarah Clampion, for stealing, on the 2d day of April, a lot of shoes, &c., from the store of James Knotts; Thomas Alexander, for stealing, on the 23d November, a $30 Shawl from Chas. DeKobe; James Morries, for stealing sundry watches from Hammet A. Pearce, March 13th; John W. Sartin, for maliciously stabbing Trenton Kennedy, with intent to ki 2d day of April, a lot of shoes, &c., from the store of James Knotts; Thomas Alexander, for stealing, on the 23d November, a $30 Shawl from Chas. DeKobe; James Morries, for stealing sundry watches from Hammet A. Pearce, March 13th; John W. Sartin, for maliciously stabbing Trenton Kennedy, with intent to kill, on the 7th of December, 1862; James H. Gilman and Archer T. Walton, for stealing a sorrel mare from Clement C. Tinsley, on the 9th of March. James Organ was put on trial for garroting and robbing Wm. H. Hardgove of a gold watch, in conjunction with one Pat Martin. He was found guilty and sent to the State prison for three
Hustings Courts, Wednesday, May 27. --Judge Wm. H. Lyons presiding — Patrick Martin was tried for garroting and robbing Wm. H. Hardgrove of a gold watch, in company with another man. He was found guilty and sent to the State's prison for five years. Virgil Jones was arraigned for breaking into the store of Pollard & Walker on the 2d of April and stealing a lot of bacon and other articles. Prisoner's counsel demurred to the indictment, but the Judge overturned the motion. The trial of Jones then proceeded, and resulted in his being convicted of the crime alleged. He was sent to the State's prison for three years. James White was arraigned for stealing a check for $137,56, payable to M. A Paris, whose name he forged. He presented the check at bank, when he was detected. When called upon to plead to the indictment, White confessed his offence and threw himself upon the mercy of the jury. He was sent to the penitentiary for one year. A jury was sworn to try Ann
Hustings Court, Monday, May 29 --Frances Brown was tried for rioting on the 2d of April, found guilty, and fined $50. Judge Lyons fixed the term of her imprisonment in jail at 4 months. Andrew J. Hawkins, was tried for rioting and acquitted. John Murphy was tried for maliciously shooting and wounding Matthew Callahan, with intent to wound and kill him. The jury found him guilty of unlawful shooting, with intent to maim, and ascertained his term of imprisonment at 4 years in the penitentiary.-- udge Crump, prisoner's counsel, moved to set aside the verdict. The motion will be determined this morning. The grand jury indicted Joseph Zimmerman and Richard Morris for grand larceny.
Hustings Court. --John Jones, indicted for engaging in the riot on the 2d day of April, was found guilty and sent to the penitentiary for one year. John W. Batler, indicted for stabbing A. N. Herdie, was found guilty of unlawful stabbing and fined $20. The Judge then sentenced him to twelve months imprisonment in jail. John McCabe, indicted for stealing one barrel of whiskey from Joseph Brummel, was found guilty by the jury, and his term of imprisonment in the penitentiary fixed at two years. James Morriss, indicted for feloniously stealing nine watches from Hammet A. Pearce was found guilty and sent to the penitentiary for five years. Edward Kennedy, indicted for stealing a gold watch from Martha M. Herman, was found guilty and sent to the penitentiary for one year.
New trial. --John Jones, convicted before Judge Meredith of engaging in the riot on the 2d of April, has been granted a new trial, which will take place at the next term of Judge Lyons's Court.
The Rioters. --Two of the parties sent on to the Hustings Court, Mrs. Kelley and Mrs. Jackson, charged with feloniously participating in the famous riot on the 2d of April, have been sent back to the Mayor for examination, the Judge being satisfied that they could not be convicted of the charges as set forth in the indictment. As they are now to be tried for misdemeanors, they are entitled to bail, and will have a hearing before his Honor on Tuesday next.
Rioting. --Mrs. Frances Kelley, charged with participating in the riot of the 2d of April, was before the Mayor yesterday for examination. Two witnesses recognized the accused as participating in the riot and as having in her possession a large bam of bacon, which she took from Messrs. Pollard & Walker's store, after aiding in breaking the door. The Mayor gave as his opinion that the taking of goods in the riot was not larceny, because not taken secretly and clandestinely; and could not be robbery, because the persons from whom they were taken were not put in bodily fear. He therefore held her to ball to answer an indictment by the Grand Jury for a misdemeanor.
The Daily Dispatch: June 18, 1863., [Electronic resource], The Act which brought Butler's career to its end. (search)
Hustings Court. --Yesterday Judge Lyons held his Court, and tried Benjamin Slemper, indicted for participating in the riot of the 2d April. He was found guilty of felony, and sent to the penitentiary for three years and eight-months. In the case of Joseph Zimmerman, indicted for receiving stolen goods knowing the same to have been stolen, the Attorney for the Commonwealth was permitted to enter a nolle prosequi, the witness himself having fled from justice.
, expresses his profound regret at having to transmit to Mr. Seward Earl Russell's reply, maintaining that the acts referred to in the correspondence, the appointment of agents in this country to fit out ships and raise money for the purpose, with the appointment of officers to superintend the construction, showed a "deliberate attempt to establish within the limits of the kingdom a system of action in direct hostility to the Government of the United States." Earl Russell, in reply, on April 2, refers to American precedents; No longer ago than the 20th of last November, in answer to the remonstrances of Mexico against an alleged organized system in the United States of aiding France in the war in which she is engaged with that Republic, but in which the United States are neutral, Mr. Seward replied by this among other citations, (Mr. Webster to Mr. Thompson;) "As to advances, loans, or donations of money to the Government of Texas, or its citizens, the Mexican Government hard
The Daily Dispatch: June 22, 1863., [Electronic resource], Confederate Issues in North Carolina. (search)
Forfeited. --Mary Jackson, charged with participating in the riot on the 2d of April, and held to bail to appear before the Mayor on last Saturday, failed to appear because of serious indisposition, and her bond was for feited. The investigation, was then fixed for the 8th of July, by which time, it is hoped, the accused will be ready to answer.
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