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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 500 AD - 599 AD or search for 500 AD - 599 AD in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SESSORIUM (search)
SESSORIUM a building of unknown origin, situated at the extreme south- east of Region V, adjoining the amphitheatrum Castrense. It was earlier than the Aurelian wall which cut through it, but is not mentioned before that time unless the emendation *sessw/rion for *shste/rion in Plutarch, Galba 28, is admitted (Becker, de Romae veteris muris 120; De Rossi, Roma sotterranea iii. 408). From the beginning of the sixth century it appears as Sessorium in the Excerpta Valesiana 69 (Mommsen, Chron. min. i. 324: in palatio quod appellatur Sessorium), and in certain scholia (Pseudoacron. in Hor. Epod. 5. 100; Sat. i. 8. 11, 14; Comm. Cruq. ad locc. citt.), where paupers and criminals are said to have been buried outside the porta Esquilina or on the Esquiline in qua est Sessorium, although this building was at least 1400 metres from the gate. That part of the building which was outside the Aurelian wall was destroyed, but the extensive inner section became an imperial residence by the beg
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SOL, TEMPLUM (search)
). The Sol worshipped in this temple was probably a synthesis of several oriental Ba'alim (Rosch. iv. 1147-148; cf. Watzinger and Wulzinger, Damaskus 38 (and Addenda 8*). In connection with the temple was a porticus (Hist. Aug. Aur. 35. 3), in which were stored the vina fiscalia (ib. 48. 4: in porticibus templi Solis vina fiscalia ponuntur) that had been brought from the CICONIAE NIXAE (q.v.), cf. CILvi. 1785 =31931; cf. PORTICUS GORDIANI). The last reference to it in antiquity is in the sixth century (Anon. de Antiq. CpI. iv. 66, ed. Banduri) when eight of the porphyry columns were sent to Constantinople for the church of S. Sophia (see in general HJ 453-456; Rosch. iv. 1146-1149; Richter 263-265). This temple was in Region VII (Not.), and in campo Agrippae (Chron. 148: templum Solis et castra The CASTRA URBANA (q.v.); cf. FORUM SUARIUM. in campo Agrippae dedicavit), but its exact site has occasioned much discussion. In the gardens of the Palazzo Colonna considerable remains of a
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, THERMAE AGRIPPAE (search)
arried out by Hadrian (Hist. Aug. Hadr. 19: Romae instauravit lavacrum Agrippae; cf. also a reference in CIL vi. 9797=AL 294). An inscription (vi. 1165) of 344/5 A.D. recording a restoration by Constantius and Constans of 'termas vetustate labefactas' was found near the church of S. Maria in Monterone close' to the west side of the baths of Agrippa, and therefore probably refers to them. They are mentioned in the Regionary Catalogue (Reg. IX), by Sid. Apollinaris (loc. cit.), and in the sixth century (Greg. Magn. Reg. vi. 42; ix. 137; Kehr i. 98). By the seventh century the destruction of the building was well under way, and that its marble was burned into lime is shown by the name Calcararium, applied to the immediate vicinity somewhat later (Mirabilia 23; Jord. ii. 439; LS i. 25). They are, however, mentioned as Thermae Commodianae in Eins. 1. 4; 2. 4; 4. 8; 8. 6. The general plan of these thermae is known from a fragment of the Marble Plan found in 1900 (NS 1900, 633-634; BC 1901,
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, THERMAE ANTONINIANAE (CARACALLAE) (search)
by the praefectus urbi to Victoria and to the victorious emperors Valentinian and Valens towards the end of it (CIL vi. 794, 1170-1173). In the fifth century the baths are named among the marvels of Rome (Pol. Silv. 545; Olympiod. ap. Phot. p. 63a Bekk.: ai( de\ )*antwnianai\ ... ei)s xrwi/an tw=n louome/nwn kaqe/e/drass ei)=xon parakaime/nas xili/as e(cakosi/ase)c narna/rou kateskeuasme/nas cestou=. Cf. THERMAE DIOCLETIANI), and there is evidence of restoration under Theodoric in the sixth century (CIL xv. 1665. 3, 4; 1669. 7), but their use must have been rendered impossible when the aqueducts were cut by the Goths in 537 A.D. The ruins were less affected than those of many other buildings by the devastations of the Middle Ages, though evidence has been found here too of the harm wrought by the earthquake of 847 (a column in the xystus resting on a mass of debris; see BASILICA AEMILIA). The name occurs in Eins. (11. 2; 13. 25) and under various forms (palatium Antonianum, l'Anton
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, XENODOCHIUM BELISARII (search)
XENODOCHIUM BELISARII a hospital built by Belisarius in the sixth century in the via Lata (LP lxi (Vigilius) 2: fecit autem Belisarius xenodochium in via Lata et aliud in via Flaminia). Its site is that of the church of S. Maria in Sinodochio or in Trivio, near the fountain of Trevi (Arm. 277-286; HCh 365-366; LPD i. 300, n. 7, ii. 46, n. 108; Kehr i. 156). This lies within the limits of the CAMPUS AGRIPPAE (q.v.), but the fourth-century walls found there cannot have been those con- structed for the xenodochium (HJ 459; BC 1892, 278).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, XENODOCHIUM DE VIA NOVA (search)
XENODOCHIUM DE VIA NOVA a hospital mentioned once in the sixth century (Greg. Magn. reg. i. 42; Kehr i. 156; LPD ii. 46, n. 108). It is doubtful which Nova via is meant.
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