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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
by a senatuseonsultum, by which the marriage of a man with his brother's daughter was declared valid; this senatusconsultum was afterwards abrogated by the emperors Constantine and Constaus. In this intrigue Agrippina displayed the qualities of an accomplished courtezan, and such was the influence of her charms and superior talents over the old emperor, that, in perejudice of his own son, Britannicus, he adopted Domitius, the son of Agrippina by her first husband, Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus. (A. D. 51.) Agrippina was assisted in her secret plans by Pallas, the perfidious confidant of Claudius. By her intrigues, L. Junius Silanus, the husband of Octavia, the daughter of Claudius, was put to death, and in A. D. 53, Octavia was married to young Nero. Lollia Paullina, once the rival of Agrippina for the hand of the emperor, was accused of high treason and condemned to death; but she put an end to her own life. Domitia Lepida, the sister of Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus, met with a similar fate. A
. C. .... Tigranes III.--B. C. 6. Artavasdes II.--B. C. 5. Tigranes III. reestablished.--B. C. 2. Erato, queen. A. D. 2. Ariobarzanes, a Parthian prince, established by the Romans.--A. D. 4. Artavasdes III. or Artabases, his Son.--A. D. 5. Erato re-established ; death uncertain.-- .... Interregnum.--A. D. 16. Vonones.--A. D. 17. Interregnum.--A. D. 18. Zeno of Pontus, surnamed Artaxias.--... Tigranes IV., son of Alexander Herodes.--A. D. 35. Arsaces II. --A. D. 35. Mithridates of Iberia.--A. D. 51. Rhadamistus of Iberia.--A. D. 52. Tiridates I.--A. D. 60. Tigranes V. of the race of Herodes.--A. D. 62. Tiridates I. re-established by Nero, reigned about eleven years longer. B. The second or younger Branch, The second or younger branch, at first at Edessa, and sometimes identical with the " Reges Osrhoenenses," afterwards in Armenia Magna. B. C. 38. Arsham or Ardsham, the Artabazes of Josephus. (Ant. Jud. 20.2.)--B. C. 10. Manu, his son.--B. C. 5. Abgarus, the son of Arsham, the Usha
bouring, would not have ventured upon an engagement, had not the courage of his soldiers and officers demanded it. The superior military skill of the Roman legions overcame all the difficulties, and a splendid victory was gained : the wife and daughters of Caractacus fell into the hands of the Romans, and his brothers surrendered. Caractacus himself sought the protection of Cartimandua, queen of the Brigantes; but she betrayed him, and he was delivered up to the Romans, and carried to Rome, A. D. 51, after the war in Britain had lasted for nine years, as Tacitus says. The emperor Claudius wished to exhibit to the people this old and formidable foe in his humiliation, and ordered Caractacus and the members of his family, with their clients and ornaments, to be led in a sort of triumph before an assembly of the people and an array of soldiers. The emperor himself was present. The relatives of Caractacus walked by his side cast down with grief, and entreated the mercy of the Romans; Carac
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
; that Quadratus, who commanded in Syria, was commissioned to take cognizance of these proceedings, and to try both the provincials and their governors; and that, while he condemned Cumanus, lie saved Felix by placing him openly among the judges and thus deterring his accusers. But, if we follow Josephus, we must believe that Cumanus was sole procurator during the disturbances in question, and that, when he was condemned and deposed, Felix was sent from Rome as his successor, probably about A. D. 51, and with an authority extending over Judaea, Samaria, Galilee, and Petraea (J. AJ 20.5-7, Bell. Jud. 2.12; Euseb. Hist. Eccl. 2.19; Vales. ad loc.).In his private and his public character alike Felix was unscrupulous and profligate, nor is he unjustly described in the killing words of Tacitus (Tac. Hist. 5.9), " per onmem saevitiam et libidinem jus regium servili ingenio exercuit." Having fallen in love with Drusilla, daughter of Agrippa I., and wife of Azizus, king of Emesa, he induced he
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Lupus, Ju'nius a Roman senator, who brought a charge of treason against L. Vitellius, the father of A. Vitellius, for the way in which he abetted Agrippina in her irregularities. But the emperor yielded to the threats or entreaties of Agrippina, and Lupus was banished, A. D. 51. (Tac. Ann. 12.42.) [C.P.M]
Mini'cia Gens came originally from Brixia (Brescia), in Cisalpine Gaul. Brixiawas a Roman colony, but in what year it became one is unknown. (Plin. Nat. 3.19.) The Minicii occur only under the empire. There was a C. Minicius Fundanus, one of the consules suffecti in A. D. 51 ; and another C. Minicius, also one of the consoles suffecti in A. D. 103. For this gens see Labus, Epigrapha nuoramente uscita dalle escarazioni Bresciana, Milan, 1830. [W.B.D]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Po'llio, Cae'lius was commander of the Roman army in Armenia, A. D. 51, and was bribed by Rhadamistus to betray the cause of Mithridates king of Armenia, whom the Romans had placed upon the throne. Notwithstanding his corrupt conduct, he was allowed to remain in Armenia till the first year of Nero's reign, A. D. 54, when he was succeeded by Laelianus. (Tac. Ann. 12.44, 45; D. C. 61.6.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
st manuscripts, is supported by the authority of inscriptions, and is evidently the correct form. In the passage of Horace (Sat. 1.1. 95) where the present reading is Ummidius, there is the same variation in the manuscripts, but Bentley has shown that the true reading is Ummidius. Quadra'tus, Ummi'dius 1. Ummidius Quadratus, was governor of Syria during the latter end of the reign of Claudius, and the commencement of the reign of Nero. He succeeded Cassius Longinus in the province about A. D. 51, and continued to govern it till his death in A. D. 60. Only three circumstances are mentioned in connection with his administration. In A. D. 52 he allowed Rhadamistus to dethrone and put to death Mithridates, the king of Armenia, whom Tiberius had placed upon the throne, and whom the Romans had hitherto supported. In the same year he marched into Judaea, and put down the disturbances which prevailed in that country. He is said to have condemned, or, according to other accounts, to have se
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Quadra'tus, Ummi'dius 1. Ummidius Quadratus, was governor of Syria during the latter end of the reign of Claudius, and the commencement of the reign of Nero. He succeeded Cassius Longinus in the province about A. D. 51, and continued to govern it till his death in A. D. 60. Only three circumstances are mentioned in connection with his administration. In A. D. 52 he allowed Rhadamistus to dethrone and put to death Mithridates, the king of Armenia, whom Tiberius had placed upon the throne, and whom the Romans had hitherto supported. In the same year he marched into Judaea, and put down the disturbances which prevailed in that country. He is said to have condemned, or, according to other accounts, to have sent to the emperor Claudius for trial, Ventidius Cumanus, one of the procuratores, but to have protected Antonius Felix, the other procurator. [Comp. FELIX, p. 143a.] The other circumstance is his disagreement with Domitius Corbulo, who had been sent into the East to conduct the war a
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
s tribunus militum in Thrace, and was quaestor in Crete and Cyrene. He was afterwards Aedile and Praetor. About this time he took to wife Flavia Domitilla, the daughter of a Roman eques, by whom he had two sons, both of whom succeeded him. In the reign of Claudius, and by the influence of Narcissus, he was sent into Germany as legatus legionis; and in A. D. 43 he held the same command in Britain, and reduced the Isle of Wight. (Sueton. Vespas. 4.) He was consul during the last two months of A. D. 51, and Proconsul of Africa under Nero, in which capacity Tacitus says (Hist. 2.97) that he was much disliked. He was at this time very poor. and was accused of getting money by dishonourable means. Love of money indeed is said to have always been one of his faults. But he had a great military reputation, and he was liked by the soldiers. He was frugal in his habits, temperate, and an enemy to all ostentation; of a kind disposition, without the passions of hatred or revenge. He had many great