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From Port Royal. --A dispatch dated Savannah, Ga., July 3d, gives the following information given by two Confederate prisoners who arrived there from Port Royal under a flag of truce: They report that 550 wounded Yankees are now at Port Royal, who were brought from James's Island after the Secessionville fight. Some of the heavy guns had been taken from Fort Pulaski to be used on James's Island. The Yankees are dying rapidly at Port Royal, numbers being buried every day, and much sickness among them. All last week the Federal officers were striving to make the Confederate prisoners take the oath of allegiance, but could not succeed. A large force was at Hilton Head. The Yankee troops at Port Royal, speech of their next movement as being likely to be made against the Charleston and Savannah Railroad. Several regiments from James's Island had arrived at Hilton Head. Bunter is in command at Hilton Head. He has a regiment called "the negro brigade," armed and unifor
all I can gather the rebel army has received its mortal wound. Cannon small arms and the field, are among the trophies. A column of rebels, 25,000 strong, passed through Dillsbury yesterday in the direction of Gettysburg." Albany, July 2.--A dispatch from Gov. Curtin to Gov. Seymour was received to-day stating that the battle at Gettysburg had not been decisive, and asking him to send all the troops he could raise without delay, as the need for them was pressing. Philadelphia, July 3.--Parties arriving here from Gettysburg say that on Wednesday 10,000 of our troops were engaged with 30,000 of the enemy. During Wednesday night 75,000 men of Gen. Meade a troops came up and took favorable positions, while 25,000 other Union troops were near at hand. The rebels had mainly concentrated near Gettysburg on Wednesday night, and there is little doubt but the great battle of yesterday would involve every available man in both armies. State of affairs in Baltimore--American f
low to be telegraphed from Washington to the Northern papers: Washington, July 3d.--An official dispatch was received this afternoon from Major-General Meade, daarmy corps moved up from Hanover at 8 o'clock this morning. Philadelphia, July 3.--A special dispatch to the Bulletin, from Harrisburg, says: Nothing is ys dashing cavalry, fighting for the possession of the gap. Columbia, Pa., July 3.--Capt. Roberts, of Philadelphia, who was captured near Gettysburg and paroled,ispatches are published by the World as "the very latest:" Philadelphia, July 3.--A special dispatch to Forney's Press, dated Hanover, 1 P. M., via Washington, July 3, says: "At 10 this morning our forces opened on about 5,000 rebels, who advanced on the field at day break for the purpose of pillaging our dead. The rebelsamputated, and he is doing well. A desperate battle rages." Washington, July 3.--The information received here is that the battle of Gettysburg last night was
One hundred dollars reward. --The above reward will be paid for a negro woman by the name of Winney Morton. who can off on Thursday morning, 3d of July. She is 5 feet high, stout built, jet black, sharp nose, talks very lady like, but looks grum. She had on a hood bonnet, head tied up with a black silk handkerchief. She has a sister living in Manchester, and a husband waiting upon. Captain Sales in the army, and owned by Sampson Jones, of Richmond. The above reward will be given, if lodged in jail. jy 4--1w* J. W. Satterwhite.
One hundred dollars reward. --The above reward will be paid for a negro woman by the name of Winney Morton who ran off on Thursday morning, 3d of July. She is 5 feet high, stout built, jet black, sharp nose, talks very lady like, but looks grum. She had on a hood bonnet, head tied up with a black silk handkerchief. She has a sister living in Manchester, and a husband waiting upon Captain Sales in the army, and owned by Sampson Jones, of Richmond. The above reward will be given, if lodged in jail. jy 4--1w* J. W. Satterwhite.
the city, and the scene partook more of the appearance of a Fourth of July evening than of any other occasion. The occasion will long be remembered by the citizens of Philadelphia. A dispatch to the New York Tribune, dated near Vicksburg, July 3d says: At 8 this morning flags of truce appeared before A. J. Smith's front, when Major-Gen. Bowen and Col. Montgomery were led blindfolded into our lines. They bore a communication from Gen. Pemberton of the following purport: "Althing from the battle field of Gettysburg, on the 6th inst., gives the following particulars of the death of Gen. Barksdale: Lieut. Col. Chas. E. Livingston, of New York, A. I. G. on Major General Doubleday's staff, on the night of Thursday, July 3, went out in the extreme front to discover if possible the body, he having been informed by a prisoner of the locality where Barksdale was shot. The spot was about a quarter of a mile in advance of our pickets, and Col. Livingston, with his smal
Later from Europe. --The European news by the City of New York is to the 3d July. --two days later. Advices to the 28th June say that at that period the Emperor of the French appeared to be uneasy in his mind on the subject of Mexico. His energy in sending out reinforcements had drooped, and great uncertainty prevailed in Paris, as to his intentions. A letter from Paris, of the 24th of June, says notwithstanding this there is immense excitement at Toulon in consequence of the preparations for the Mexican expedition. One of the local papers assuming that war, no matter for what purpose, is a subject for congratulation, exclaims joyfully, "We are in as great a bustle now as in the good old times of the Crimean and Italian campaigns." The rumor that the French army has retired as far as Orizaba, there to form a basis of operations, is but faintly denied. The Madrid Constitution says that, as the legislative session will not close till the beginning of July, it is probab
James Flanagan, permitting his servant Maria to go at large, Fined $10 and costs. Jerome Diggs, for dealing faro. Trial continued and accused balled for his appearance at the next term. John G. Scott, feloniously assaulting with a brick and killing James Powers, on the 15th of June. Examined and sent on for final trial at the next term of Judge Lyons's Court. This murder occurred in the city jail, where prisoner and deceased were confined. William, a slave, charged with stealing $100 from Sam Hastings, on the 3d of July. Tried and acquitted. John H. Day, exhibiting fare for negroes, in a house in the Valley. Found guilty by the jury and fined $100. The Court sentenced him to twelve months imprisonment in the city jail. Prisoner's counsel gave notice of his intention to file a bill of exceptions, the Court having overruled his motion to set aside dict. Court will meet this morning at 11 the the witnesses should be. The o'clock, when was present
which you will take possession; officers to retain their side-arms and personal property, and the rights and property of citizens to be respected. I am, General, yours very respectfully, J. C. Pemberton, Lieut. General. To this General Grant immediately replied as follows: not Satisfactory. Headq'rs Deparm't of Tennessee, Before Vicksburg, July 4, 1863. Lieut Gen. Pemberton, Commanding Forces in Vicksburg: General — I have the honor to acknowledge your communication of the 3d of July. The amendments proposed by you cannot be acceded to in full. It will be necessary to furnish every officer and man with a parole, signed by himself, which, with the completion of the rolls of prisoners, will necessarily take some time. Again, I can make no stipulation with regard to the treatment of citizens and their private property. While I do not propose to cause any of them undue annoyance or loss, I cannot consent to leave myself under restraint by stipulation. The property whic
Before the capitulation the miners and sappers of the enemy and those of our own army had got within ten paces of each other, and whilst they were working under ground the picks of each could be heard by the other, each striving to get his mine in readiness before the other's. The Colonel says that when the enemy sprung his mine, which produced such disaster, in two hours more ours would have been in readiness, which would have been sprung to the great detriment of the enemy. On the 3d of July Gen. Pemberton determined to hold out no longer. The food was nearly exhausted, and the soldiers had become worn out from excessive fatigue. To cut their way out was impossible. No help was at hand. He therefore resolved to obtain the best terms in a capitulation, and accordingly sent a flag of truce for that purpose. It is not necessary to publish the honorable terms which Gen. Pemberton obtained from the enemy. They form one of the relieving features of this otherwise wholly lament
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