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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. Joel R. Abney Joel R. Abney, of Greenwood county, S. C., was born in that portion of Edgefield county now called Saluda, September 12, 1836. His parents were Joel and Martha (Coleman) Abney. His great-grandfatJoel R. Abney, of Greenwood county, S. C., was born in that portion of Edgefield county now called Saluda, September 12, 1836. His parents were Joel and Martha (Coleman) Abney. His great-grandfather, Nathaniel Abney, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, as was also his maternal grandfather, John Coleman. Mr. Abney was reared in Edgefield county on a farm, and farming has been the chief business of his life. During the excitement incident to the bombardment of Fort Sumter he volunteered in Edgefield county and went to Abney. His great-grandfather, Nathaniel Abney, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, as was also his maternal grandfather, John Coleman. Mr. Abney was reared in Edgefield county on a farm, and farming has been the chief business of his life. During the excitement incident to the bombardment of Fort Sumter he volunteered in Edgefield county and went to Charleston as a member of Company E, Seventh South Carolina regiment. The fort surrendered, however, before his company reached Charleston. Young Abney was then in very poor health and had been for some time. Because of this, after the brief stay at Charleston, he was given an honorable discharge. Though his health continued fe