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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. 3 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. 2 2 Browse Search
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ion, and inspecting the station of the Metropolitan park police. Mr. Wait evidently enjoyed the woods walk and spoke with much satisfaction of the time when he owned a boat and made frequent trips on Mystic river both ways from Cradock bridge, and on Mystic lake. He was well liked by both social and business acquaintances and had a pleasant salutation for each. As a member of the Medford Historical Society he was interested not alone in the Register, but in its collections as well. He contributed some old Medford town reports, in one of which he took pleasure in showing me the amount of taxes paid by Ackerman & Philbrick (my grandfather and great-uncle), owners of one of the afore-mentioned quarries. He was also interested in our new home, visiting it several times a week to watch its construction and talk over the plans with the building committee. The Society needs new members to fill the places left by such as he. Who, who will now take their places in our ranks? H. N. A.
e sluices the charter required. More expensive to build and maintain was the bridge by which it crossed the Middlesex canal near its terminal in Charlestown. Only at one other point were they two close neighbors —where they crossed the town line. The canal, only the previous year, had used about all the available space in the base of the ledgy hill for its course, and the turnpike company had to build a river wall for some distance to sustain its road. In 1840 this was rebuilt by Messrs. Ackerman & Co. for a dozen rods for $351.00. This locality was commonly known as the Rock, See register, Vol. XIII, p. 79. and was the place where the adroit stage-drivers, in passing, sprinkled a few drops of Concord river water from the canal into the salt Mystic with their whip-lashes to the passengers' amusement. For the greater part of its length of three and a half miles its mode of construction was simple. The marsh mud dug from a dozen feet on each edge of the six-rod lay-out was
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 23., The Society's work, 1919-20. (search)
anuary 19, came in the wake of a blizzard and deep snow. Favorable reports of officers were received—our home free of debt and practically a clean slate on current expenses. The election made no change in personell of Executive Board. Vice-President Ackerman was chosen President, succeeding Mr. Mann, who was chosen Librarian to succeed Mr. Remele, who succeeds Mr. Ackerman as Vice-President. A substantial token of esteem was presented to the retiring President, who received it in surprise wno change in personell of Executive Board. Vice-President Ackerman was chosen President, succeeding Mr. Mann, who was chosen Librarian to succeed Mr. Remele, who succeeds Mr. Ackerman as Vice-President. A substantial token of esteem was presented to the retiring President, who received it in surprise with thanks closing five years of service with no absent marks. On Patriots' Day over a hundred visitors came to our rooms. The Society has been represented at the Bay State League meeting
The Society's work. Publication of the society's work for two years has been omitted, but is here resumed. The season of 1921-22 was opened by a special meeting on September 21, the three hundredth anniversary of the coming here of white men. Report of recent meeting at Hingham of the Bay State League was given. It was attended by Dr. Green, Messrs. Ackerman, Dunham and Eddy and Mr. and Mrs. Mann. A letter and program of celebration was received from the Annapolis, N. S., Historical Society. A finely executed book of their anniversaries was later received. The president then announced the subject of the evening, The visit of Myles Standish and his party to the site of Medford on September 21, 1621, and called Miss Atherton, who read an extract from the oration of Charles Sprague (Boston, July 4, 1825), The Disappearing American Indian. The president then spoke on Indian trails, read from Paths and Legends of New England Border and of the Mohawk Trail, and then asked
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 26., The Society's meetings, 1921-22. (search)
The Society's meetings, 1921-22. The opening meeting of the season was on October 17. Several members gave accounts of summer vacation experiences, a letter from Mr. Remele (who had recently removed to California), telling of scenes there was read and listened to with interest. Miss Hila Helen Small of the High School staff then gave an instructive and interesting address on Dante. On November 21 was the Thanksgiving Time Meeting. President Ackerman spoke of contrasts between 1621 and 1921 and read of the first Pilgrim thanksgiving day. Master Kenneth Ames and Miss Dorothy Richards read peace selections from the poet Whittier, and this part taken by our young visitors was much appreciated. While the assembly stood, announcement was made of the recent deaths of two long-time members, Rosewell Bigelow Lawrence and Leonard Jarvis Manning. At the meeting of December 18 Mrs. Mary Soule Googins, a member (and Mayflower descendant from George Soule) read an interesting p