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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 311 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 100 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 94 8 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 74 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 68 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 54 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 44 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 44 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 41 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for John Adams or search for John Adams in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Abigail (Smith, (search)
Adams, Abigail (Smith´╝ë, Wife of President John Adams; born in Weymouth, Mass., Nov. 23, 1744; daughter of the Rev. William Smith; was married Aug. 25, 1764, when Mr. Adams was a rising young lawyer in Boston. In 1784 she joined her husband in France, and in the following year went with him to London, where neither her husbanMr. Adams was a rising young lawyer in Boston. In 1784 she joined her husband in France, and in the following year went with him to London, where neither her husband nor herself received the courtesies due their position. In 1789-1810 she resided at the seat of the national government, and passed the remainder of her life in the Quincy part of Braintree, dying Oct. 28, 1818. Her correspondence, preserved in Familiar letters of John Adams and his wife, Abigail Adams, during the Revolution, t-1810 she resided at the seat of the national government, and passed the remainder of her life in the Quincy part of Braintree, dying Oct. 28, 1818. Her correspondence, preserved in Familiar letters of John Adams and his wife, Abigail Adams, during the Revolution, throws important light upon the life of the times which it cover
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Charles Francis, 1807-1886 (search)
uren being the candidate for the Presidency. They were defeated. In 1850-56 Mr. Adams published the Life and works of John Adams (his grandfather), in 10 volumes. In 1859 he was elected to Congress from the district which his father long representat of the Civil War. He remained as American minister in London until 1868, when, in un>February, he resigned. In 1872 Mr. Adams was first a Liberal Republican, and then a Democrat, in politics. His labors in the field of literature were various. n occasional contributor to the North American review. His principal task was the preparation of the Life and works of John Adams, and a Life of John Adams, in 2 volumes. He also issued the Life and works of John Quincy Adams, in 12 volumes. He diJohn Adams, in 2 volumes. He also issued the Life and works of John Quincy Adams, in 12 volumes. He died in Boston, Nov. 21, 1886. When the spirit of secession was rampant in Congress late in December, 1860, he tried to soothe the passions of the Southern politicians by offering in the House Committee of Thirty-three a resolution, That it is expedie
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John, 1735- (search)
Adams, John, 1735- Second President of the United States; from 1797 to 1801; Federalist; born in Braintree (near Quincy)ng that the courts might proceed without the use of stamps, Adams opened the case by declaring that the Stamp Act was void, a elected to a seat in the General Court. From that time John Adams was a leader among the patriots in Massachusetts. He wallowing winter, he negotiated for another Dutch loan. John Adams In 1785 Adams went as minister to the English Court. aAdams went as minister to the English Court. and there he prepared his Defence of the American Constitution. Being coldly received, he returned home, and. in 1788, was elhe Alien and Sedition Law. In his eagerness for re-election Adams offended a powerful faction of his party, and was beaten byd upon the virtue and patriotism of my fellow-citizens. John Adams. The fourth of July. In a letter to his wife. dated Philadelphia, July 3, 1776, Mr. Adams made the following predictions: Had a declaration of independence been made sev
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John Quincy, 1767- (search)
tes; from 1825 to 1829; Republican; born in Braintree, Mass., July 11, 1767; was a son of President John Adams; and was graduated at Harvard College in 1787. In February, 1778, he accompanied his fat1798, to negotiate a treaty with Sweden. At Berlin he wrote a series of Letters from Silesia. Mr. Adams married Louisa, daughter of Joshua Johnson, American consul at London, in 1797. He took a seart Gallatin negotiated a commercial treaty with Great Britain, which was signed July 13, 1815. Mr. Adams remained in London as minister until 1817, when he was recalled to take the office of Secretarnabled it to give fuller attention to domestic concerns. During his occupation of this office Mr. Adams was identified with the negotiation of the treaty with Spain by which Florida was ceded to the cabinet the two questions concerning the interpretation of the act as passed by the Congress, Mr. Adams stood alone in the opinion that the word forever meant forever. When Monroe's administratio
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ambassador, (search)
Ambassador, The title of the highest diplomatic officer. In the days immediately preceding the establishment of the American Republic the officers who were sent to Europe on diplomatic missions were officially termed commissioners. On June 1, 1785, when Marquis Carmarthen introduced John Adams to the King of Great Britain, he designated the American representative as Ambassador Extraordinary from the United States of America to the Court of London. When the American diplomatic service was permanently organized, the title of the highest representative was made Envoy Extraordinary and minister Plenipotentiary, subordinate representatives being given the title of Ministers or Ministers resident. In 1893 Congress passed an act providing that whenever a foreign government elevated its representative at Washington to the rank of an ambassador, the United States government would raise its representative to that foreign government to the same rank. Under this law the American repres
oid giving offence, they asked the Continental Congress to assume the regulation and direction of that army. Joseph Warren, in a private letter to Samuel Adams, wrote that the request was to be interpreted as a desire for the appointment of a new chief commander of all the troops that might be raised. Just then the news arrived of the approach of reinforcements for Gage, under Generals Clinton, Howe, and Burgoyne, and Congress felt the importance of acting promptly. At the suggestion of John Adams, the army was adopted as a continental one; and, at the suggestion of the New England delegation, Thomas Johnson. of Maryland, nominated George Washington, of Virginia, for commander-in-chief of the armies of the inchoate republic. He was elected (June 15, 1775) by unanimous vote, and on the following morning John Hancock, president of Congress, officially announced to Washington his appointment. The Virginia colonel arose and. in a brief and modest speech, formally accepted the office.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blaine, James Gillespie, 1830-1893 (search)
and a generous belief that the benefits and burdens of government would be common to all. Himself a conspicuous illustration of what ability and ambition may do under republican institutions, he loved his country with a passion of patriotic devotion. and every waking thought was given to her advancement. He was an American in all his aspirations, and he looked to the destiny and influence of the United States with the philosophic composure of Jefferson and the demonstrative confidence of John Adams. The political events which disturbed the President's serenity for many weeks before that fateful day in July form an important chapter in his career, and, in his own judgment, involved questions of principle and of right which are vitally essential to the constitutional administration of the federal government. It would be out of place here and now to speak the language of controversy: but the events referred to. however they may continue to be a source of contention with others, have
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Board of War and ordnance, (search)
Board of War and ordnance, A committee appointed by Congress, June 12, 1776, consisting of John Adams, Roger Sherman, Benjamin Harrison, James Wilson, and Edward Rutledge, with Richard Peters as secretary. This board continued. with changes, until October, 1781, when Benjamin Lincoln was appointed Secretary of War.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boston, (search)
ad not Governor Hutchinson assured the people that justice should be vindicated in the morning. They retired, but were firmly resolved not to endure military despotism any longer. The governor was called upon at an early hour to fulfil his promise. The people demanded the instant removal of the troops from Boston and the trial of Captain Preston and his men for murder. Their demands were complied with. The troops were removed to Castle William (March 12), and Preston, ably defended by John Adams and Josiah Quincy, two of the popular leaders in Boston, was tried and acquitted, with six of his men, by a Boston jury. This loyalty to justice and truth, in the midst of unreasoning public excitement, gave the friends of the Americans in England a powerful argument in favor of being just towards the colonists. The Boston tea party is a popular name given to an occurrence in Boston Harbor in December, 1773. To compel Great Britain to he just towards her American colonies, in the matt
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Congress, National (search)
1 a circular letter was sent to the absentees, urging their prompt attendance; but it was the 30th before a quorum (thirty members) of the House was present. Frederick A. Muhlenberg, of Pennsylvania, was chosen speaker of the House, and John Langdon, of New Hampshire, was made (April 6) president of the Senate, for the sole purpose of opening and counting the votes for President and Vice-President of the United States. Washington was chosen President by a unanimous vote (sixty-nine), and John Adams was elected Vice-President by a majority. He journeyed to New York when notified of his election, and was inaugurated April 21, 1789. Washington was inaugurated April 30. The pay of members of Congress (House of Representatives) had been $6 a day until 1814, when, on account of the increased expense of living, they fixed it at an annual salary of $1,500, without regard to the length of the session. At the same time bills were introduced to increase the salaries of foreign ministers,
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