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None can regret more than I do this publication, which was made without my knowledge or authority. The President is the sole judge of when, and what parts of, the reports of a commanding officer should be made public. I, individually, do not object to delaying its publication as long as the War Department shall think it necessary and proper for the success of our cause. Meanwhile I entreat my friends not to trouble themselves about refuting the slanders and calumnies aimed at me. Alcibiades, on a certain occasion, resorted to a singular method to occupy the minds of his traducers; let, then, that synopsis answer the same purpose for me in this instance. If certain minds cannot understand the difference between patriotism, the highest civic virtue, and office-seeking, the lowest civic occupation, I pity them from the bottom of my heart. Suffice it to say that I prefer the respect and esteem of my countrymen, to the admiration and envy of the world. I hope, for the sake of
is of my report of the battle of Manassas. None can regret more than I do this, from a knowledge that, by authority, the President is the sole judge of when and what part of the commanding officer's report shall be made public. I, individually, do not object to delaying its publication as long as the War Department thinks proper and necessary for the success of our cause. Meanwhile I entreat my friends not to trouble themselves about refuting the slanders and calumnies aimed against me. Alcibiades, on a certain occasion, resorted to an extraordinary method to occupy the minds of his traducers — let, then, that synopsis answer the same purpose for me in this instance. If certain minds cannot understand the difference between patriotism, the highest civic virtue, and office-seeking, the lowest civic occupation, I pity them from the bottom of my heart. Suffice it to say that I prefer the respect and esteem of my countrymen to the admiration and envy of the world. I hope, for the sak
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), entry 1598 (search)
y colored accounts of others; we can seldom test our impressions of their sincerity by standing with them face to face. Here certainly the ancient pocket republics had much the advantage of us: in them citizens and leaders were always neighbors; they stood constantly in each other's presence. Every Athenian knew Themistocles's manner, and gait, and address, and felt directly the just influence of Aristides. No Athenian of a later period needed to be told of the vanities and fopperies of Alcibiades, any more than the elder generation needed to have described to them the personality of Pericles. Our separation from our leaders is the greater peril, because democratic government more than any other needs organization in order to escape disintegration; and it can have organization only by full knowledge of its leaders and full confidence in them. Just because it is a vast body to be persuaded, it must know its persuaders; in order to be effective, it must always have choice of men
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Roosevelt, Theodore 1858-1893 (search)
dealt the decisive blows at Manila and Santiago had been launched from two to fourteen years, and they were able to do as they did because the men in the conning-towers, the gun-turrets, and the engine-rooms had through long years of practice at sea learned how to do their duty. Its early stages. Our present navy was begun in 1882. At that period our navy consisted of a collection of antiquated wooden ships, already almost as out of place against modern war-vessels as the galleys of Alcibiades and Hamilcar —certainly as the ships of Tromp and Blake. Nor at that time did we have men fit to handle a modern man-of-war. Under the wise legislation of the Congress and the successful administration of a succession of patriotic Secretaries of the Navy belonging to both political parties the work of upbuilding the navy went on, and ships equal to any in the world of their kind were continually added; and, what was even more important, these ships were exercised at sea singly and in squ
as. None can regret more than I do this publication, which was made without my knowledge or authority. The President is the sole judge of when and what parts of the report of a commanding officer should be made public. I, individually, do not object to delaying its publication as long as the War Department shall think it necessary and proper for the success of our cause. Meanwhile, I entreat my friends not to trouble themselves about refuting the slanders and calumnies aimed at me. Alcibiades, on a certain occasion, resorted to a singular method to occupy the minds of his traducers; let, then. that synopsis answer the same purpose for me in this instance, If certain minds cannot understand the difference between patriotism, the highest civic virtue, and office-seeking, the lowest civic occupation, I pity them from the bottom of my heart. Suffice it to say, that I prefer the respect and esteem of my countrymen to the admiration and envy of the world. I hope, for the sake
am′mer-tail spring. (Horology.) A long and stiff spring in a clock which gives the effective impulse to the striking hammer, when the latter is retracted for a blow and then released. Ham′mock. (Nautical.) From hamac; the suspended bed of the Bahama-Islanders when discovered by Columbus. A swinging sea-bed, common in South American countries and elsewhere, and made of manilla, seagrass, and other fiber, often ornamented and of delicate material. The undisputed invention of Alcibiades (Admiral Smyth). It is a piece of canvas, 6 by 4 feet, the end gathered by knittles and a grommet, forming the head and foot clews, to which is attached the lanyard by which it is suspended from rings in the deck beams. The illustration is rather a swinging cot. The orders on board ship are, Down all hammocks! Up all hammocks! Lash hammocks! Their respective meanings are, to carry below and sling; to unsling and stow away; to brail up to allow a clear passage between decks. H
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
ve watched closely the questions between us and England, Concerning Central America and an alleged violation of our neutrality laws. and never at any moment have they seemed to me to have any vitality. I have thought it a mistake on the part of Seward to take part in them, and thus help magnify them, or at least draw to them public attention, which is precisely what the Administration desires. There is no honesty in the way in which these questions have been pressed. The old trick of Alcibiades is repeated, who cut off his log's tail in order to give the people of Athens something to tall about. Everything is now attempted to divert attention from Kansas. I have the cause of arbitration and of peace so much at heart that I should be glad in any demonstration for them which did not tend to magnify our foreign dangers and preoccupy the public mind. Feeling that I could not touch these questions at this moment without giving the enemy an opportunity for a new cry, and that in poi
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays, The Greek goddesses. (search)
ious ceremonial appealed alike to the high-born maidens who ministered at the altars, and to the peasant-girls through whom the oracles spoke. Every range of condition and of culture might be comprised among the hundreds who assembled before daybreak to bathe the image of Pallas in the sacred river, or the thousands who walked with consecrated feet in the long procession to Eleusis. In individual cases, the service brought out such noble virtue as that of the priestess Theano, who, when Alcibiades was exiled from Athens and was sentenced to be cursed by all who served at the altar, alone refused to obey, saying that she was consecrated to bless and not to curse. But even among the mass of Greek women, where so much time was spent in sharing or observing this ritual of worship, life must have taken some element of elevation through contact with the great ideal women of the sky. We cannot now know, but can only conjecture, how far the same religious influence inspired those Greek
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays, Sappho. (search)
the real Lesbian society in the reports of Maximus Tyrius, whom Felton strangely calls a tedious writer of the time of the Antonines, but who seems to me often to rival Epictetus and Plutarch in eloquence and nobleness of tone. In his eighth dissertation he draws a parallel between the instruction given by Socrates to men and that afforded by Sappho to women. Each, he says, appears to me to deal with the same kind of love, the one as subsisting among males, the other among females. What Alcibiades and Charmides and Phaedrus are with Socrates, that Gyrinna and Atthis and Anactoria are with the Lesbian. And what those rivals Prodicus, Gorgias, Thrasymachus, and Protagoras are to Socrates, that Gorgo and Andromeda are to Sappho. At one time she reproves, at another she confutes these, and addresses them in the same ironical language with Socrates. Then he draws parallels between the writings of the two. Diotima says to Socrates that love flourishes in abundance, but dies in want.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers, Epochs of American History. (search)
346 pages. Cloth, $1.25. We regret that we have not space for more quotations from this uncommonly strong, impartial, interesting book. Giving only enough facts to elucidate the matter discussed, it omits no important questions. It furnishes the reader clear-cut views of the right and the wrong of them all. It gives admirable pen-portraits of the great personages of the period with as much freedom from bias, and as much pains to be just, as if the author were delineating Pericles, or Alcibiades, Sulla, or Caesar. Dr. Wilson has earned the gratitude of seekers after truth by his masterly production.—N. C. University Magazine. This admirable little volume is one of the few books which nearly meet our ideal of history. It is causal history in the truest sense, tracing the workings of latent influences and far-reaching conditions of their outcome in striking fact, yet the whole current of events is kept in view, and the great personalities of the time, the nerve-centers of hist
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