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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 90 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 8 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 8 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 4 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
Ex-Secretary of the Treasury Manning, born 1831, dies at Albany, N. Y.......Dec. 24, 1887 Secretary Lamar resigns......Jan. 7, 1888 Asa Gray, botanist, born 1810, dies at Cambridge, Mass.......Jan. 30, 1888 David R. Locke, Petroleum V. Nasby, Confederate X Roads, born 1833, dies at Toledo, O.......Feb. 15, 1888 W. W. Corcoran, philanthropist, born 1798, dies at Washington, D. C.......Feb. 24, 1888 A. Bronson Alcott, born 1799, dies at Boston, Mass., March 4, and Louise M. Alcott, his daughter, novelist, born 1832, dies at Boston......March 6, 1888 Blizzard on the Atlantic coast; thirty lives lost; $10,000,000 worth of property destroyed; about 4 feet of snow falls in New York City, and drifts in the streets 10 to 20 feet deep......March 12-13, 1888 Chief-Justice Morrison R. Waite, born 1816, dies at Washington, D. C.......March 23, 1888 Brighton Beach Hotel, Kings county, N. Y., a wooden structure 465 feet long, 150 deep, and 3 stories high, estimated weigh
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Centennial Contributions (search)
Centennial Contributions The Alcott centennial Read at the Second Church, Copley Square, Boston, Wednesday, November 29, 1899. A hundred years ago A. Bronson Alcott was born, and thirty-three years later his daughter Louisa was born, happily on the same day of the year, as if for this very purpose,--that you might testify your appreciation of the good work they did in this world, at one and the same moment. It was a fortunate coincidence, which we like to think of to-day, as it unA. Bronson Alcott was born, and thirty-three years later his daughter Louisa was born, happily on the same day of the year, as if for this very purpose,--that you might testify your appreciation of the good work they did in this world, at one and the same moment. It was a fortunate coincidence, which we like to think of to-day, as it undoubtedly gave pleasure to Bronson Alcott and his wife sixty-seven years ago. How genuine were Mr. Alcott and his daughter, Louisa! All else, says the sage, is superficial and perishable, save love and truth only. It is through the love and truth that was in these two that we still feel their influence as if they were living to-day. How well I recollect Mr. Alcott's first visit to my father's house at Medford, when I was a boy! I had the same impression of him then that the consideration
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Chapter 4: pictures of the struggle (search)
ate the system, and intensify the wrongs of American slavery, and therefore utterly undeserving of the patronage of lovers of liberty and friends of humanity. Never before was I so affected by the speech of man. When he had ceased speaking I said to those around me: That is a providential man; he is a prophet; he will shake our nation to its center, but he will shake slavery out of it. We ought to know him, we ought to help him. Come, let us go and give him our hands. Mr. Sewall and Mr. Alcott went up with me, and we introduced each other. I said to him: Mr. Garrison, I am not sure that I can indorse all you have said this evening. Much of it requires careful consideration. But I am prepared to embrace you. I am sure you are called to a great work and I mean to help you. With a mind as acute as a lawyer's, and a spirit as unselfish as a seraph's, May plunged into the cause. It is he who appeared upon the scene to protect and to represent Prudence Crandall at the meeting
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Index (search)
ered the horrors of slavery, 188; and Emerson, 226, 227; certain ante-bellum doings of, 244 if.; and English liberals, 249, 250. And see Abolition, Antislavery, Lunt Committee, National Anti-Slavery Society, Rynders Mob, Thompson. Adams, Charles Francis, 250. Adams, John, 49. Adams, John Quincy, not an Abolitionist, 88, 89; character of, 89, go; his service in Congress in old age, 90-92; and Massachusetts, 92; 7,50. African Repository, The, 63, 64. agitator, what is an? 10. Alcott, A. Bronson, 80. Andrew, John A., 243. Anti-Slavery, G. and, 97 if.; G.'s conduct during Boston mob an exemplification of the policy, 117; political history of, where to be found, 136; meeting at Broadway Tabernacle, 203 if.; a sort of special illumination, 228; agitation in Edinburgh, 246; meeting in London, 246, 247. And see Abolition, Abolitionists, National Anti-Slavery Society. Anti-Slavery League, organized by G. in London, 246, 247. Anti-Slavery societies in 1830, 47, 48; overslaug
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 3: the man begins his ministry. (search)
d to those around me: That is a providential man; lie is a prophet; he will shake our nation to its center, but he will shake slavery out of it. We ought to know him, we ought to help him. Come, let us go and give him our hands. Mr. Sewall and Mr. Alcott went up with me and we introduced each other. I said to him, Mr. Garrison, I am not sure that I can indorse all you have said this evening. Much of it requires careful consideration. But I am prepared to embrace you. I am sure you are called to a great work, and I mean to help you. Mr. Sewall cordially assured him of his readiness also to cooperate with him. Mr. Alcott invited him to his home. He went and we sat with him until twelve that night, listening to his discourse, in which he showed plainly that immediate, unconditional emancipation, without expatriation, was the right of every slave, and could not be withheld by his master an hour without sin. That night my soul was baptised in his spirit, and ever since I have been a
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 7: master strokes. (search)
the union of men as anti-slavery helps. Garrison determined to summon to his side the powerful agency of an anti-slavery society devoted to immediate and unconditional emancipation. He had already made converts; he had already a small following. At Julien Hall, on the occasion of his first lecture on the subject of slavery, he had secured three remarkable men to the movement, viz., Rev. Samuel J. May, then a young Unitarian minister, Samuel E. Sewall, a young member of the Bar, and A. Bronson Alcott, a sage even in his early manhood. They had all promised him aid and comfort in the great task which he had undertaken. A little later two others, quite as remarkable as those first three were drawn to the reformer's side, and abetted him in the treason to iniquity, which he was prosecuting through the columns of the Liberator with unrivaled zeal and devotion. These disciples were Ellis Grey Loring and David Lee Child. They were a goodly company, were these five conspirators, men o
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Index. (search)
Index. Adams, Charles Francis, 372. Adams, John Quincy, 54, 250-251. Adams, Nehemiah, 278 Adams, William, 292. Alcott, A. Bronson, go, 91, 134. American Anti-Slavery Society, 174, 311, 340, 373, 387. Andover Seminary, 19o. Andrew, John A., 381, 389. Annexation of Texas, 335. Anti-Slavery Standard, 299. Atchison, David, 338, 374. Attucks, Crispus, 227. Bacon, Leonard W., 162. Bartlett, Ezekiel, 18, 20. Beecher, Lyman, Iio, III, 16I, 189, 190, 269. Benson, George, 194, 263. Benson, George W., 168, 178, 234, 260, 281. Benson, Henry E., 212, 263. Benton, Thomas H., 105-106, 252, 253, Bird, Frank W., 361. Birney, James G., 203, 298, 320. Bond, Judge, 382. Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society, 217, 233, 240. Bourne, Rev. George, i08, 203. Bowditch, Henry I., 233, 349, 389. Bright, John, 390, 391. Brooks, Preston S., 359. Brown, John, 365-368. Buffum, Arnold, 139, 177. Burleigh, Charles C., 221, 223, 235. Buxton, Thomas Fowell, 152, 154, 204. Calhoun, John C., 246,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 1: Margaret Fuller Ossoli — Introductory. (search)
nt me by himself; (4) those to the Hon. A. G. Greene, of Providence, R. I., sent me by his daughter, Mrs. S. C. Eastman, of Concord, N. H.; (5) those to the Hon. George T. Davis, shown to me by his son, James C. Davis, Esq.; (6) many letters and papers of different periods, sent to me from London by the Rev. W. H. Channing; (7) Margaret Fuller's diary of 1844, lent by Mrs. R. B. Storer, of Cambridge; (8) her traveling diary in England and Scotland, which I own; (9) several volumes of Mr. A. Bronson Alcott's Ms. diary; (10) a translation of her letters to her husband in Italy, the version being made by the late Miss Elizabeth Hoar, and lent me by her sister, Mrs. R. B. Storer. To this I may add a store of reminiscences from Margaret Fuller's old Cambridge friends. In the cases where I have used the same written material with the editors of the Memoirs, the selections employed have been wholly different. A few printed books, issued since the publication of the Memoirs, have given som
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 6: school-teaching in Boston and Providence. (1837-1838.) (search)
re true than now. After her father's death she must seek a shorter path to self-support than was to be found in those alluring ways of literature and philosophy which she would have much preferred. An opening offered itself in the school of Mr. A. B. Alcott, in Boston, where Miss Elizabeth P. Peabody had been previously employed. Mr. Alcott's unpublished diary gives the successive steps in the negotiation and enables me to present the beginning and the end together. 1836, August 2d. Emer interested. The editor of the Courier, Mr. J. T. Buckingham, rejoined by quoting the opinion of a Harvard professor that one third of Mr. Alcott's book was absurd, one third was blasphemous, and one third was obscene. Biographical Sketch of A. B. Alcott, p. 15. Such was the hornet's nest into which Margaret Fuller had unwarily plunged herself by following the very mildest-mannered saint who ever tried his hand at the spiritual training of children. With what discrimination she viewed th
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, chapter 7 (search)
My sufferings last winter in Groton were almost constant, and I see the journal is very sickly in its tone. I have taken out some leaves. Now I am a perfect Phoenix compared with what I was then, and it all seems past to me. Ms. letter, November 25, 1839. During this invalid winter, however, she made a brief visit to Boston, where she had three enjoyments, so characteristic as to be worth quoting:-- 7 January, 1839. Three things were specially noteworthy. First, a talk with Mr. Alcott, in which he appeared to me so great, that I am inclined to think he deserves your praise, and that he deceived neither you nor himself in saying that I had not yet seen him. Beside his usual attitude and closeness to the ideal, he showed range, grasp, power of illustration, and precision of statement such as I never saw in him before. I will begin him again and read by faith awhile. There was a book of studies from Salvator Rosa, from the Brimmer donation, at the Athenaeum, which I lo
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