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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 10 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 11, 1862., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 10 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 5, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Alexander or search for Alexander in all documents.

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day evening. A negro warned it a mile and a half beyond the town of some danger but our informant says he was unheeded — nobody would take the responsibility of stopping the train, which ran into the town and into the hands of the Yankees before it was stopped. His statement would certainly convict some one of gross culpability. It was fired on and stopped, but no one hurt. The sick and wounded and officers were paroled to the number of about 300. They arrested no citizen save Mr. J. D Alexander, of Fredericksburg, who was twice in custody and twice released by Col. Davis, who seemed to direct matters, though a superior officer, supposed to be Stoneman, was with the command. Some Government officials adroitly escaped under the garb of citizens' apparel. One of them had most important papers on his person. The Yankees burnt at Ashland two locomotives and tenders and some cars. They tore up a mile or two of road, destroyed all the bridges from Ashland to within five miles of