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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 17 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for William Rounceville Alger or search for William Rounceville Alger in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: no. 13
Chestnut Street
, Boston 1864; aet. 45 (search)
s, kind and friendly. After seeing him in the Senate she writes: Sumner looks up and smiles. That smile seems to illuminate the Senate. Another passage in the Journal of March, 1864, is in a different note: Maggie ill and company to dinner. I washed breakfast things, cleared the table, walked, read Spinoza a little, then had to fly round, as my dinner was an early one. Picked a grouse, and saw to various matters. Company came, a little early. The room was cold. Hedge, Palfrey, and Alger to dinner. Conversation pleasant, but dinner late, and not well served. Palfrey and Hedge read Parker's Latin epitaph on Chev, amazed at the bad Latinity. In June, 1864, a Russian squadron, sent to show Russia's good — will toward the United States, dropped anchor in Boston Harbor, and hospitable Boston rose up in haste to receive the strangers. Dr. Holmes wrote a song beginning,-- Seabirds of Muscovy, Rest in our waters, which was sung to the Russian national air at a public recept
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: no. 19
Boylston place
: later Lyrics --1866; aet. 47 (search)
de and assist me. No mortal can. The next day's entry is more cheerful. Feel better to-day. Made the acquaintance of Aldrich and Howells and their wives, at Alger's last evening. I enjoyed the evening more than usual. Aldrich has a very refined face. Howells Mr. Howells, in his Literary Boston Thirty Years Ago, thus sof Boston, but a still higher impulse of Boston she will not survive, for that will last while the city endures. is odd-looking, but sympathetic and intelligent. Alger was in all his glory. April 11.... Between a man governed by inner and one governed by outer control, there is the difference which we find between a reptile in. I did not wish to give a party, on account of Uncle's death, but could not help getting together quite a lovely company of friends. Aldrich and wife were here, Alger, Bartol, Professor Youmans, Perabo, Dresel, Louisa D. Hunt, and others. It was a good time.... Saw my last cent go-- nothing now till May, unless I can earn somet
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: more changes--1886-1888; aet. 67-69 (search)
ad a flash or two. The state of Karma [calmer], orchestral conversation, and solo speaking. She hears the Reverend William Rounceville Alger's paper on the Blessed life. Very spiritual and in a way edifying; but marred by what I should call mixea very pleasant and rather brilliant talk, as might have been expected where such men meet. She writes to Maud:-- Mr. Alger seized upon my left ear metaphorically and emptied into it all the five-syllable words that he knew, and the result wasdead eyes, dead smile, and (worst of all) dead breath. September 23. To church in Newport. A suggestive sermon from Mr. Alger on Watching, i.e., upon all the agencies that watch us, children, foes, friends, critics, authorities, spirits, God himpass our lives in a sense of this divine supervision. After this inward experience I was almost startled by the theme of Alger's sermon. I spoke to him of the coincidence, and he said it must have been a thought wave. The thought is one to which
y, I, 124, 345, 361; II, 228, 287, 292. Agassiz, Louis, I, 124, 151, 251, 345; II, 150, 158. Aide, Hamilton, II, 251. Airlie, Lady, II, 254. Alabama, II, 108. Albania, I, 272. Albany, I, 342. Albert of Savoy, II, 303. Albert Victor, II, 9. Albinola, Sig., I, 94. Alboni, Marietta, I, 87. Alcott, A. Bronson, I, 285, 290; II, 57, 120. Aldrich, Mrs., Richard, II, 367. Aldrich, T. B., I, 244, 262; II, 70, 354, 357, 358. Aldrich, Mrs. T. B., I, 245. Alger, Wm. R., I, 207, 244, 245; II, 127, 139, 140. Allston, John, I, 12. Alma-Tadema, Lady, II, 168, 169. Alma-Tadema, Laurence, II, 168, 169, 171. Almy, Mr., II, 139. Amadeo, II, 31, 278. Amalfi, II, 33. Amberley, Lady, I, 266. Amelie, Queen, II, 30. America, I, 7, II, 207, 247, 267, 273, 320, 344; II, 18, 21, 189. American Academy of Arts and Letters, II, 399. American Academy of Science, I, 251, 259. American Authors, Society of, II, 355. American Branch, Int