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George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 27 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William Allan or search for William Allan in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
e Hagerstown road when he fell, pierced by three musket balls and survived but an hour. Colonel William Allan rightly says: He was greatly beloved by his men as a brave and chivalrous leader. ´╝łAllaAllan's Army of Northern Virginia in 1862, page 386, note.) Rallied by Colonel Grigsby. Colonel Grigsby rallied the men of the front line at the edge of the woods, where they resisted a while lon this time there was a lull in the fighting on this part of the field, thus characterized by Colonel Allan (page 396): A comparative lull now succeeded the furious storm of the morning, while the exhgaged. For an account of the battle on other parts of the field the reader is referred to Colonel Allan's The Army of Northern Virginia in 1862, and to General Palfrey's The Antietam and Frederickpared to the number of General McClellan's army, with which General Lee fought this battle. Colonel Allan says (page 380): Lee's entire infantry force was under 30,000, to which should be added his
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
y as about 1,700, or 2,900 all together, and the artillery as 39 officers, 818 men, 857 together. This would give an aggregate of a little more than 4,000; but in a note to the editors General Early states that at the time of the battle his force was reduced to 8,500 muskets, which would reduce this aggregate to 13,000. Rodes' Division was the largest in the corps, and a short time before the battle I reported between 2,600 and 2,700 muskets in the division. I remember distinctly that Colonel Allan, the chief of ordnance of the army, told me that there were then abont 9,500 muskets in the army. Perhaps this was the return of August 31, noted above, for I do not remember that we made any return of September 10, it being customary to make returns every ten days, when we were in camp. Now, let us look at Sheridan's force. His field return for September 10, 1864, gives as present for duty 43,284 men, 2,225 officers, a total of 45,509. To this we must add Averill's Cavalry Divisio
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Generals are all passing away. (search)
great commander, Robert Edward Lee, rest under the charge that he lost the battle of Gettysburg by stupendous blunders, which his Old War Horse saw, pointed out and remonstrated with him against at the time. Anyone desirous of studying fully the Gettysburg campaign and battle, will find the facts very fully set forth in the Southern Historical Society Papers, especially in the papers of General J. A. Early, General James Longstreet, General Fitzhugh Lee, General Walter H. Taylor, Colonel William Allan, General A. L. Long, General E. P. Alexander, General J. B. Hood, General Henry Heth and others, and in the official reports of nearly all of the prominent officers engaged. Meantime, it ought to be said that the charge, so freely made, that the censure of General Longstreet originated with those who opposed his political course, is utterly unsustained by the facts. The charge that Lee lost the battle of Gettysburg by obstinately refusing to take Longstreet's advice was first p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Index. Abbott, Dr., Lyman, 97. Adams, Hon. C. F., His defense of R. E. Lee, 89. Alabama, Mississippi, Department of, in 1864, 48; closing scenes in, 49. Allan, Colonel, William, 34. Anderson, Captain 49th Va., wounded, 26; Captain J. R., 177. Antietam or Sharpsburg, Battle of, 32; U. S. and C. S. forces engaged in, 36. Appomattox, C. H., 284, 347. Artillery. The Light, 297. Ashe, Captain S. A., 357. Atkinson, Colonel, John Wilder, 141. Bassinger, Major S. W., 134. Baylor, Captain, George, 365. Beauregard, General P. G. T., 76; unjustly blamed at Shiloh. 310. Benham Major Calhoun, 216. Benton, T. H., his eulogy of Lee, 87. Berkeley, Captain F. N. 14. Bethel, Battle of, 347. Bobbitt B. Boisseau, 339. Bond Captain, W. R., 235. Boteler, Hon. A. R., his house burned, 267. Bradford, U. S. Navy Admiral, 333. Breckinridge, General John C., 306. Bright. Captain R. A., 228, 356. Brooke, Colonel John M.,327. Brunswick Guards, Company H