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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
opinion, long entertained, that the soldiers of the United States never give way without good reason. On the same day Major-General Wheeler, with Dibrell's and Allen's brigades, encountered a large body of Federal cavalry near Varnell's Station. Dismounting all of his troops but two regiments, he made a combined attack of infaal cavalry captured the hospitals of Hood's corps, which were in an exposed situation east of the Connesauga. Major-General Wheeler, who was sent to the spot with Allen's and Humes's brigades, drove off the enemy and pursued them two miles, taking two standards, and capturing forty prisoners. An hour or two after noon, intellig of the 27th to transfer Cleburne's division of Hardee's corps to our right, where it was formed on the prolongation of Polk's line. Kelly's cavalry, composed of Allen's and Hannon's Alabama brigades, together less than a thousand men, occupied the interval, of half a mile, between Cleburne's right and Little Pumpkin-Vine Creek.
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 12 (search)
t.-Gen. Hardee galloped up at the same time, followed by the Eighth Texas cavalry regiment which he had found on the way. He instantly directed Henderson to charge the enemy in front, and the Texans their left flank; Lieut.-Gen. Hampton coming up on the other side with Young's brigade, commanded at the time by Colonel Wright, threw it against Mower's right flank; and Maj.-Gen. Wheeler, at a considerable distance from this point, assailed the rear of the Federal column in flank with a part of Allen's Alabamians. These simultaneous attacks were so skillfully and bravely made, that in spite of the great disparity of numbers, the enemy was defeated in a few minutes, and driven back along the route by which the column had advanced. In the Eighth Texan regiment, Lieut.-Gen. Hardee's only son, a noble youth of sixteen, charging bravely in the foremost rank, fell mortally wounded. The firing upon our front was sustained until the return of the Seventeenth Corps to its place in line, whe