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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 6 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 15, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 28, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. 3 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. 3 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 15, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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tion on the advancing foe, and by a desperate struggle, in which the Twelfth Kentucky cavalry and Forty-fifth Ohio mounted infantry distinguished themselves, the rebel column was checked, reeled, and finally gave way. This cheering result was quickly followed by the enemy advancing in every direction. The battle progressed for four hours, during which time our trusty Enfields and carbines were dealing death in the rebel lines, while our little battery, under the command of the gallant Lieutenant Allison, was in close and effective range. The anaconda began to tighten, and our little band were being gradually confined to more narrow limits; and, there being no hopes of reenforcements from Loudon, all began to feel their critical attitude, and that something must speedily be done, or defeat and capture were inevitable. Our men, wearied with four hours exertion, and plainly seeing themselves surrounded by the rebel lines, began to settle down in the conviction that capture was unavoida
ined to the use of that arm. I issue orders to the chiefs of the Commissary and Quartermasters Departments to act promptly in aid of your efforts. I send to General A. S. Johnston about 7,000 stand of arms, and such of your regiments as join the Tennessee Army will have their share of these weapons, and this, I regret to say, is the utmost that I can promise. I am your obedient servant, J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of War. Decatur, March 17, 1862. Major-General Hardee, Huntsville: Allison's regiment arrived. When will more of your troops be here and how many? How much transportation has the railroad company been able to furnish you Hurry the forces forward. A. S. Johnston, General, C. S. Army. Corinth, March 17, 1862. Brigadier-General Chalmers: First. Two regiments of Wood's brigade will soon be with you. Second. Plant your guns so as to defend Eastport as well as to sweep the river. Hold Eastport as long as possible without disaster. Third. Throw up slight
are--Smithers. Maryland--Cresswell, Henry Winter Davis, F. Thomas, Webster. West Virginia--Blair, Brown, Whaley. Kentucky--Anderson, Randall, Smith, Yeaman. Ohio — Ashley, Eckley, Garfield, Hutchins, Schenck, Spaulding. Indiana--Colfax, Dumont, Julian, Orth. Illinois--Arnold, Farnsworth, Ingersoll, Norton, E. B. Washburne. Missouri--Blow, Boyd, King, Knox, Loan, McClurg, J. S. Rollins. Michigan--A. C. Baldwin, Beaman, Driggs, F. W. Kellogg, Longyear, Upson. Iowa — Allison, Grinnell, A. W. Hubbard, Kasson, Price, Wilson. Wisconsin--Cobb, McIndoe, Sloan, Wheeler. Minnesota--Donnelly, Windom. Kansas--Wilder. Oregon--McBride. Nevada--Worthington. California--Cole, Higby, Shannon.--Total, 119. Nays--[All Democrats.] Maine--Sweat. New York — Brooks, Chanler, Kalbfleisch, Kernan, Pruyn, Townsend, Ward, Winfield, Ben. Wood, Fernando Wood. New Jersey--Perry, W. G. Steele. Pennsylvania--Ancona, Dawson, Dennison, P. Johnson, W. H. Mill<
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 5: casualties compared with those of European wars — loss in each arm of the service — deaths from disease — classification of deaths by causes. (search)
The two great battles of the age, in point of loss, are Waterloo and Gettysburg. Between them there is a remarkable similarity, both in numbers engaged and extent of casualties. At Waterloo, the French numbered 80,000 men, and 252 guns; Allison. the Allies numbered 72,000 men, and 186 guns. At Gettysburg, the Union Army numbered 82,000 men, and 300 guns; The Comte de Paris, in his history of the war, estimates that the union army had only 82,000 actually on the field. Gen. Meade'sle since the introduction of gunpowder. The casualties in that battle have been variously stated: The Encyclopedia Brittannica puts the Russian loss at 30,000 in killed, wounded, and prisoners, and the French loss at considerably above 20,000. Allison gives the losses at Borodino in round numbers only, placing the French loss at 50,000, and the Russian at 45,000. The most credible statement is found in the Journal of The London Statistical Society, which places the number of killed and wound
the enemy's heavy fire; also, Lieut. J. Duryea, who led the charge up to the left flank of the batteries; also, Lieuts. York and Cambreling; Surgeon Gilbert for performing upon the field of battle successful amputations and for his continued attention to the suffering and wounded, not only on the field, but afterward at the hospital, when almost exhausted; also, Lieut. Gouv. Carr, who was commanding Company B, his captain being ill, and Lieut. Geo. Duryea; also, Sergeants Agnes, Onderdonk, Allison, and Corporal Brunner. Yet there was no flinching on the part of any officer or private, and I might mention many more with honor. In closing I cannot but speak of Col. Townsend, of the Third, who, with his whole command, stood up nobly in my support, until compelled to retreat by the terrible fire. Per order, Col. A. Duryea. Lieut. Mallory, Aide-de-Camp. To Brigadier-Gen. Pierce. Captain Kilpatrick's report. Headquarters, Camp Hamilton, June 11, 1861. Sir:--In accordance
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Roster of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
Mch 63; 28 Sep 65 Boston. $50. Wilson, George 32, mar.; laborer; Hudson, N. Y. 4 Mch 63; 24 Dec 63 Portsmouth Grove, R. I.; dis. Wounded 18 July 63 Ft. Wagner. $50. Wilson, William Corpl. 29, sin.; laborer; Indianapolis, Ind. 12 May 63; killed 30 Apl 65 in camp Georgetown, S. C. by S. J. Benton Co A. $50. Wilson, William II. 22, sin.; farmer; W. Chester, Pa. 26 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. woods, Thomas Corpl. 38, mar.; teamster; New York. 9 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Company B. Allison, George 22 sin.; farmer; Philadelphia. 14 Mch 63; missing 18 Jly 63 Ft. Wagner. S. C; supposed killed. $50. Anderson, Elijah 30, mar.; stevedore; Philadelphia. 27 Feby 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Anderson, Solomon E. 34, mar.; farmer; W. Chester, Pa. 9 Mch 63; died pris. Jan 65 Florence, S. C. Captd. 18 Jly 63 Ft. Wagner. $50. Armstrong, George A. Corpl. 22, mar.; barber; Philadelphia 3 Mch 63; deserted 10 May 63 Readville. —— Bailey, David 22, sin.; laborer; Philadelphia. 25 Feb.
ccounted for in this last writing, can do so without the labor of examining the roster name by name, the following list is given:— List of missing at Fort Wagner. Co. A. Benton, Andrew, 1st. Sergt. Dugan, George W., Private. Ellis, George J. F., Private. ford, Joseph, Private. garrison, Silas, Private. Jackson, James H., Private. Johnson, Peter B., Private. Lamb, Marshall, Private. Townsend, Ralsey R., Private. waterman, George F., Private. Co. B. Allison, George, Private. Bailey, David, Private. Brooks, John Henry, Private. Brown, Morris, Private. Glasgow, London, Private. Snowdon, John A., Private. walls, Albert, Private. Co. C. Campbell, Joseph R., Private. Hall, Joseph Lee, Private. Halsey, Ira E., Private. Johnson, Samuel, Private. Price, George, Private. Torrence, Abram P., Private. Turner, Treadwell, Private. Co. E. Anderson, William, Private. Harris, Alfred, Private. Lopeman, Char
List of missing at Fort Wagner. Co. A. Benton, Andrew, 1st. Sergt. Dugan, George W., Private. Ellis, George J. F., Private. ford, Joseph, Private. garrison, Silas, Private. Jackson, James H., Private. Johnson, Peter B., Private. Lamb, Marshall, Private. Townsend, Ralsey R., Private. waterman, George F., Private. Co. B. Allison, George, Private. Bailey, David, Private. Brooks, John Henry, Private. Brown, Morris, Private. Glasgow, London, Private. Snowdon, John A., Private. walls, Albert, Private. Co. C. Campbell, Joseph R., Private. Hall, Joseph Lee, Private. Halsey, Ira E., Private. Johnson, Samuel, Private. Price, George, Private. Torrence, Abram P., Private. Turner, Treadwell, Private. Co. E. Anderson, William, Private. Harris, Alfred, Private. Lopeman, Charles H., Private. Proctor, Joseph J., Corp. weeks, John, Private. Co. G. Body, Charles, Private. Myers, William, Private
ief intervals when the skirmishing was quite spirited on both sides. Our artillery kept up a steady fire all the afternoon from the Fourth Corps, directed upon Pine Knob, a very high hill, which the enemy had heavily frotified, and upon which he had twenty pieces of cannon planted, very few of which opened in response to the vigorous salutes of Simonson's Fifth Indiana battery, attached to General Stanley's division. Simonson's battery, or at least one section of it, under command of Lieutenant Allison, opened at eleven o'clock from a commanding point to the west of the knob upon the enemy. The second shot fired exploded immediately in front of Generals Hardee, Johnston and Polk, who were standing together in consultation, and a fragment entered the breast of General Polk, passed through the body, causing instant death. Of this there is not the slightest doubt, as all prisoners and deserters taken in the afternoon agreed as to the manner in which the Reverend Lieutenant-General met
er beloved teachers, she seemed to absorb knowledge with every sense. She herself writes: Much of the training and inspiration of my early days consisted not in the things that I was supposed to be studying, but in hearing, while seated unnoticed at my desk, the conversation of Mr. Brace with the older classes. There, from hour to hour, I listened with eager ears to historical criticisms and discussions, or to recitations in such works as Paley's Moral Philosophy, Blair's Rhetoric, Allison on Taste, all full of most awakening suggestions to my thoughts. Mr. Brace exceeded all teachers I ever knew in the faculty of teaching composition. The constant excitement in which he kept the minds of his pupils, the wide and varied regions of thought into which he led them, formed a preparation for composition, the main requisite for which is to have something which one feels interested to say. In her tenth year Harriet began what to her was the fascinating work of writing compo
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