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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 539 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 88 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 58 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 54 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 54 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 44 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 39 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 38 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 38 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 22, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Americans or search for Americans in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: October 22, 1862., [Electronic resource], The opinion of the Northern press on Lincoln's proclamation. (search)
y next at the ballot box. The Philadelphia Inquirer, the editor of which, though a Republican, is neither a Federal officeholder nor an aspirant for party honors, has the good sense and courage to say in his issue of Tuesday: There are in this city to-day hundreds of battle-worn and wounded soldiers, who have rendered to their country the citizen's highest duty on the battle-field. They are now at home, with shattered constitutions, or with mutilated bodies — Republicans, native Americans, and Democrats-men of all parties, who will be here upon the election day, and will, beyond all doubt, vote with their old parties. Yet these new lights in political morals will tell the battle-stained and scarred Democrat that if he votes for his party nominee he is a Secessionist and traitor! What precious logic it must be that leads to such monstrous conclusions as that! --Again, let us look at the policy of making public proclamation beforehand, that every man who votes in a specifie