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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 2.18 (search)
In front of the Stone wall at Fredericksburg. condensed from the overland monthly, 1869, Vol. III., p. 432, by permission of Fisher Ames. General John W. Ames, U. S. Surveyor-General of California, died in San Rafael, in that State, in 1877. by John W. Ames, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. V. On Saturday, December 13th, our brigade The 2d Brigade of regulars (Sykes's division, Fifth Army Corps), commanded by Major George L. Andrews, 17th U. S. Infantry. General Ames was then a captain in the 11th U. S. Infantry.--editors. had been held in reserve, but late in the day we were hurried to the battle only to see a field full of flying men and the sun low in the west shining red through columns of smoke,--six deserted field-pieces on a slight rise of ground in front of us, and a cheering column of troops in regular march disappearing on our left. But the day was then over and the battle lost, and our line felt hardly bullets enough to draw blood before darkness put an end to
f political parties, and at their caucuses, and at their ballotings, there have never been instances of ruthless violence, or passionate menace, or systematic corruption. The meetings have been marked with that decorum and self-respect which evince an intelligent and virtuous community. Votes in Medford for representatives in Congress. Dates of Election.Names.No. of Votes. Dec. 18, 1788.William Hull16.  Eleazer Brooks11. Oct. 4, 1790.Elbridge Gerry46. Nov. 2, 1792.Suffolk, Fisher Ames16.  Essex, Benjamin Goodhue16.  Middlesex, Samuel Dexter12. For the three counties, or district. Nov. 2, 1792.John Coffin Jones15. For the state at large, except Maine.  David Cobb16. Nov. 3, 1794.Benjamin Goodhue30. Nov. 7, 1796.Samuel Sewall (unanimous)  Nov. 5, 1798.Samuel Sewall49. Nov. 3, 1800.Nathan Reed83. Nov. 1, 1802.John Q. Adams95.  William Eustice18. Nov. 1804.Josiah Quincy100.  William Eustice31. Nov. 3, 1806.Josiah Quincy58.  James Prince22. Nov. 7, 1808.Jo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ames, Fisher, 1758-1808 (search)
Ames, Fisher, 1758-1808 Orator and statesman; born in Dedham, Mass., April 9, 1758; was graduated at Harvard College in 1774; taught school until 1781; then began the practice of law: and soon displayed rare oratorical powers. He wrote political essays for Boston newspapers, over the signatures of Brutus and Camillus. In Congress from 1789 until 1797 he was always distinguished for his great business talent, exalted patriotism, and brilliant oratory. Ardently devoted to Washington, personally and politically, he was chosen by his colleagues to write the address to the first President on his retiring Fisher Ames. from office in 1797. After leaving Congress he devoted himself to the practice of his profession; but finally, on account of declining health, gave it up to engage exclusively in agricultural pursuits. In 1804 he was chosen president of Harvard College, but declined the honor. He received the degree of Ll.D. from that institution. His orations, essays, and lette
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
. 20, 1795 Fourth Congress, first session, opens at Philadelphia, Pa.......Dec. 7, 1795 Proclamation of the Jay treaty......March 1, 1796 House demands the papers relating to the Jay treaty......March 24, 1796 [President declined, the House being no part of the treaty-making power.] Jefferson writes the famous Mazzei letter, about......April 21, 1796 [The publication of this letter, about a year later, severs all friendly relations between Washington and Jefferson.] Fisher Ames's speech before the House on the Jay treaty with England......April 28, 1796 House agrees to sustain Jay's treaty......April 30, 1796 Tennessee admitted (the sixteenth State)......June 1, 1796 First session adjourns......June 1, 1796 New treaty with the Creek Indians......June 29, 1796 Washington's Farewell address issued, refusing to accept office again......Sept. 19, 1796 Charles C. Pinckney succeeds James Monroe as minister to France......September, 1796 Third Pres
he same claim has been made on this floor; and this seems more astonishing, because the archives of the country furnish such ample and undoubted materials for its refutation. The question of the comparative contributions of men by different States and sections of the country in the war of the Revolution, was brought forward as early as 1790, in the first Congress under the Constitution, in the animated and protracted debate on the assumption of State debts by the Union. On this occasion Fisher Ames, a Representative from Massachusetts, memorable for his classic eloquence, moved a call upon the War Department for the number of men furnished by each State to the Revolutionary armies. This motion, though vehemently opposed, was carried by a small majority. Shortly afterwards, the answer to the call was received from the Department, at that time under the charge of General Knox. This answer, which is one of the documents of our history, places beyond cavil or criticism the exact con
he same claim has been made on this floor; and this seems more astonishing, because the archives of the country furnish such ample and undoubted materials for its refutation. The question of the comparative contributions of men by different States and sections of the country in the war of the Revolution, was brought forward as early as 1790, in the first Congress under the Constitution, in the animated and protracted debate on the assumption of State debts by the Union. On this occasion Fisher Ames, a Representative from Massachusetts, memorable for his classic eloquence, moved a call upon the War Department for the number of men furnished by each State to the Revolutionary armies. This motion, though vehemently opposed, was carried by a small majority. Shortly afterwards, the answer to the call was received from the Department, at that time under the charge of General Knox. This answer, which is one of the documents of our history, places beyond cavil or criticism the exact con
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 5 (search)
t to that? No. Each year the patient industrious peasant gives so much time from the cultivation of his soil and the care of his children to stop the breaks and replace the willow which insects have eaten, that he may keep the land his fathers rescued from the water, and bid defiance to the waves that roar above his head, as if demanding back the broad fields man has stolen from their realm. Some men suppose that, in order to the people's governing themselves, it is only necessary, as Fisher Ames said, that the Rights of Man be printed, and that every citizen have a copy. As the Epicureans, two thousand years ago, imagined God a being who arranged this marvellous machinery, set it going, and then sunk to sleep. Republics exist only on the tenure of being constantly agitated. The antislavery agitation is an important, nay, an essential part of the machinery of the state. It is not a disease nor a medicine. No; it is the normal state,--the normal state of the nation. Never, to
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 8 (search)
is speeches on our question, too short and too few, are remarkable for their compact statement, iron logic, bold denunciation, and the wonderful light thrown back upon our history. Yet how little do they present which was not familiar for years in our antislavery meetings! Look, too, at the last great effort of the idol of so many thousands, Mr. Senator Sumner,--the discussion of a great national question, of which it has been said that we must go back to Webster's Reply to Hayne, and Fisher Ames on the Jay Treaty, to find its equal in Congress,--praise which we might perhaps qualify, if any adequate report were left us of some of the noble orations of Adams. No one can be blind to the skilful use he has made of his materials, the consummate ability with which he has marshalled them, and the radiant glow which his genius has thrown over all. Yet, with the exception of his reference to the antislavery debate in Congress, in 1817, there is hardly a train of thought or argument, an
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The scholar in a republic (1881). (search)
altpetre you would yourself have been a soldier. But Bacon says, In the theatre of man's life, God and his angels only should be lookers-on. Sin is not taken out of man as Eve was out of Adam, by putting him to sleep. Very beautiful, says Richter, is the eagle when he floats with outstretched wings aloft in the clear blue; but sublime when he plunges down through the tempest to his eyry on the cliff, where his unfledged young ones dwell and are starving. Accept proudly the analysis of Fisher Ames: A monarchy is a man-of-war, stanch, iron-ribbed, and resistless when under full sail; yet a single hidden rock sends her to the bottom. Our republic is a raft hard to steer, and your feet always wet; but nothing can sink her. If the Alps, piled in cold and silence, be the emblem of despotism, we joyfully take the ever-restless ocean for ours,--only pure because never still. Journalism must have more self-respect. Now it praises good and bad men so indiscriminately that a good word
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 2: the Worcester period (search)
ccur from the mere size and weight of our future nation, than from the hostilities arising from slavery, though, he says, this last would no doubt be by far the most glorious cause of a separation. He said some very weighty things about the general position and character of the nation, the necessity of discussing first principles, and the wrong done by any distrust of agitation. Our fathers built our nest upon the waves, and we must not shudder at its rocking motion ; and then he quoted Fisher Ames, that our nation was not a ship of state, but a raft; safer, indeed, but one's feet were always in the water. . . . He described his position very quietly, without egotism; said he felt no sensation of old age, except sometimes hi walking; could work in his study from 9 A. M. to 9 P. M. without fatigue. I am a miracle to myself, he said. Then he told me of the memoir of J. Q. Adams on which he is now engaged and which will be out in a few weeks. Then, said he, with a sort of roguish
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