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at FortSumter. One of the men who recently returned from Fort Sumter details an incident that took place there on Major Anderson taking possession. It is known that the American flag, brought away from Fort Moultrie, was raised at Sumter precisey at noon on the 27th ult., but the incidents of that "flag raising" have not been related. A short time before noon Major Anderson assembled the whole of his little force, with the workmen employed on the fort, around the foot of the flag-staff. The national ensign was attached to the cord, and Major Anderson holding the end of the lines in his hands, knelt reverently down. The officers, soldiers and men clustered around, many of them on their knees, all deeply impressed with the solemnity ods of the speaker ceased, and the men responded Amen, with a fervency that perhaps they had never before experienced, Major Anderson drew the "Star Spangled Banner" up to the top of the staff, the band broke out with the national air of "Hail Columbi
The wife of Major Anderson arrived at Charleston, S. C., Sunday evening, and is stopping at the Mills House. Hon. Ed. Ruffin, of Va., is at present at Tallahassee, Fla.
.; by Mr. Childs, resolutions of the citizens of Fauquier co., asking for a State Convention and Southern Conference; by Mr. Crane, the petition of Matthew Warnsley, praying to be refunded a sum of money improperly paid in the year 1857-'8; by Mr. Anderson, certain resolutions on the state of public affairs, adopted at a meeting of the citizens of Botetourt county. Alabama and Virginia.--The Speaker announced a communication from the Governor, enclosing the credentials of certain ambassadorthe appointment of a committee of five on the part of the House and three on the part of the Senate, to wait on said Commissioners, and ascertain when it would be convenient for them to address the General Assembly. Carried, and Messrs. Seddon, Anderson, Hopkins, Bassell and Lundy appointed House committee. Mr. Seddon was directed to inform the Senate of the action of the House.--For further and detailed notice, see Senate proceedings. Committee of Finance.--By leave of the House, Mr. Barb
[special Dispatch to the Richmond Dispatch.]Washington rumors. Washington, Jan. 8. --A dispatch, it is said, has been received from Charleston, stating that Major Anderson being notified that Federal troops were on their way to reinforce him, wrote a letter to the commander at Fort Moultrie, saying that if the steamer was interrupted he would fire on that fort. The reply he received is said to have been a defiant one. The President promised Hon. A. R. Boteler, of Virginia, that no troops should be sent to Harper's Ferry. Seventy-five, however, have been sent there, Zed.
the powers of the General Government, but aggression upon the equal rights of the other States; that peaceable secession, if possible, must necessarily be a matter of agreement between the States, and until such agreement is made, the existing Government has no choice but to enforce the laws and protect the property of the nation; that in view of what is now transpiring in the Southern States, of threats to prevent the inauguration of a President constitutionally elected, it is incumbent upon the loyal people of the several States to be prepared to render all their aid, military and otherwise, to the enforcement of the Federal laws; that Major Anderson deserves the thanks of the country for the course pursued by him. We declare that there should be an exhaustion of peaceful measures before the sword is drawn, therefore we are in favor of any just, honorable, and constitutional settlement of the question of African slavery, that Congress may adopt, and the American people may justify.
The Daily Dispatch: January 9, 1861., [Electronic resource], The late murder of a policeman in New Orleans. (search)
ir attachment to the Federal Union. He recommends that the military companies take such steps as they may deem due to the memory of Jackson and the gallantry of Anderson. At sunrise 33 guns will be fired for the Union, at noon 56 in honor of Major Anderson, and at sunset 78 for Andrew Jackson. During this salute the bells wake such steps as they may deem due to the memory of Jackson and the gallantry of Anderson. At sunrise 33 guns will be fired for the Union, at noon 56 in honor of Major Anderson, and at sunset 78 for Andrew Jackson. During this salute the bells will be tolled. A movement is also on foot for a sword for Major Anderson. ake such steps as they may deem due to the memory of Jackson and the gallantry of Anderson. At sunrise 33 guns will be fired for the Union, at noon 56 in honor of Major Anderson, and at sunset 78 for Andrew Jackson. During this salute the bells will be tolled. A movement is also on foot for a sword for Major Anderson.
Resignation of Secretary Thompson. Washington, Jan. 8. --Secretary Thompson, of the Interior, to-day resigned, on the ground that after the order to reinforce Major Anderson was countermanded on the 31st December, there was a distinct understanding that no troops should be ordered South, without the subject being considered by, and decided on in, the Cabinet. At the Cabinet meeting on the 2nd inst., the matter was again debated, but not determined. Notwithstanding these facts, the Seded on the 31st December, there was a distinct understanding that no troops should be ordered South, without the subject being considered by, and decided on in, the Cabinet. At the Cabinet meeting on the 2nd inst., the matter was again debated, but not determined. Notwithstanding these facts, the Secretary of War, without the knowledge of Mr. Thompson, sent 250 troops in the Star of the West, to reinforce Major Anderson.--Not learning of this until this morning, he now resigns on hearing it.
Salutes in Massachusetts. Boston, Jan. 7. --To commemorate the battle of New Orleans and in honor of Major Anderson, Gov. Andrews has ordered a salute of 100 guns on Boston Common to-morrow, and national salutes in fifteen other cities and towns in the Commonwealth.
The Daily Dispatch: January 9, 1861., [Electronic resource], Incidents of the late earthquake in Maine. (search)
1. -- The undersigned offers his services to the public as a Hirer of Negroes for the ensuing year. His increased experience enables him confidently to promise those who engage his services, that their business will be attended to in the most satisfactory manner, and prompt returns made quarterly. References.--N. P. &T. C. Howard. Lee & Pleasants, L. r. Spillman, John H. Guy, Attorneys at Law, Alvey & Lipscomb, Porter, Harris & Horner, Merchants, Dr. Thomas Pollard. Rev. Philip B. Price. Richmond; Col. B. Anderson, N. W. Miller, Dr. John Morris. Dr. G. W. Harris, C. F. Pope, Jno. S. Swift. Postmaster, John Woodson, Thos. J. Parkins. Goochland Co., Va.; J. L. Crittenden, W. S. Embry, J. Joseph Dovenman, Fauquter Co., Va.; Geo. Hamilton, Culpeper Co, Va.; W Lunsford, S. W. Skinker. James For es. Stafford Co., Va.; Douglas H Gordon, Fredericksburg. Va.: Col. M. M. Parne. U. S. A., Washington, D. C. Lucien Lewis, Office under Metropolitan Hall, Richmond, Va. de 15--1m