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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 68 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Records of Longstreet's corps, A. N. V. (search)
re at once made by General Lee to attack. Jackson's line was formed with Whiting's division on the left and D. H. Hill's on the right. Stafford's Louisiana brigade of Ewell's division held the centre between Whiting and Hill. The rest of Jackson's command was formed in a second line in rear of the first. On the right of D. H. Hill came in Armistead's and Wright's brigades of Huger's division, and on their right D. R. Jones' sub-division of Magruder's command, consisting of Tombs' and G. T. Anderson's brigades. The remainder of Huger's command (Mahone's and Ransom's brigades), and of Magruder's command (Barksdale's, Cobb's, Kershaw's and Semmes' brigades, the last two constituting McLaws' division), were disposed and used in support of Armistead, Wright and D. R. Jones. General Holmes, with his division, moved from New Market a short distance down the River road, and formed line of battle, but took no part in the action, deeming the enemy's position too strong for attack in that di
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 9: Second battle of Manassas. (search)
onsboroa. This was done with artillery, dismounted cavalry, and charges of mounted squadrons. The object having been accomplished, the brigade was slowly withdrawn and placed on the left of the line of battle at Sharpsburg. While McClellan was attempting the passage of Turner's Gap with his main army, Franklin with the Sixth Corps, supported by Couch's division, was struggling to get through Crampton's Gap, where McLaws had left a brigade and regiment of his division, and a brigade of Anderson's, to prevent the enemy from passing through the mountains at that point, and threatening his rear at Maryland Heights. The work of these brigades and a portion of Stuart's cavalry was well performed; and when the fighting, which had been going on from twelve o'clock, ceased at night, Franklin had made such progress that they were withdrawn also. On the morning of the 15th, as McClellan was passing through the mountains near Boonsboroa, Franklin was marching through Crampton Pass at about
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 10: Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. (search)
e remaining brigades of Ewell, while General Walker with his two brigades was placed on Longstreet's right. The cavalry were located on either flank. These are all the troops McClellan would have encountered if he had attacked on the 16th. Anderson's six brigades, McLaws's four, and A. P. Hill's five-making fifteen brigades-did not reach Lee until the 17th. After they had arrived the total infantry amounted to 27,255 men, which, with eight thousand cavalry and artillery, would make Lee'sd Jackson's position, and who got in with his brigade, as he usually did, at the proper moment. Hood and Early, re-enforced by the brigades of Ripley, Colquitt, and Garland, under Colonel McRae, of Hill's division, and D. R. Jones, under Colonel G. T. Anderson, now took up the fighting; the Federals were again driven back, and again brought up fresh troops. General McLaws arrived just in time to meet them; General Walker brought from the right, together with Early's division, drove the Federal
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 12: Gettysburg. (search)
housand. Both armies mourned the death of brave men and competent officers. In the Army of the Potomac four general officers were killed-Reynolds, Vincent, Weed, and Zook-and thirteen wounded, viz., Hancock, Sickles, Gibbon, Warren, Butterfield, Barlow, Doubleday, Paul, Brook, Barnes, Webb, Stanard, and Graham. In the Army of Northern Virginia five general officers were killed-Pender, Garnett, Armistead, Barksdale, and Semmesand nine wounded, viz., Hood, Hampton, Heth, J. M. Jones, G. T. Anderson, Kemper, Scales, and Jenkins. Meade showed no disposition to assume the offensive after Pickett's repulse. Like Lee at Fredericksburg, he did not want to lose the advantages of position, and was not certain the battle was over. The relative numbers in each army were still about the same, for their losses did not vary much, and the greater part of Lee's army was ready to receive him; he might have been repulsed in turn, producing perhaps other combinations and other results. Lee's
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 13: campaign in Virginia.-Bristol Station.-mine Run.-Wilderness. (search)
o was near Gordonsville then with two divisions (Pickett's was south of James River), was directed to follow, as well as Anderson's division of Hill's corps which was on Rapidan Heights. On the 5th, in two columns, Lee advanced by the old turnpike a his whole line. Sedgwick was attacked before his orders required him to attack; but Longstreet was not yet up, nor was Anderson's division of Hill's corps. So Lee had to wait on his right; but Hancock His own corps and Getty's division of the drove their right back in some confusion. Lee's right wing was threatened with disaster; neither Longstreet's corps nor Anderson's division of Hill's had arrived. The former left his camp near Gordonsville at 4 P. M. on the 4th, and marched that afassailed. Holding his front with three brigades under Gregg, Benning, and Law, Longstreet threw four-viz., Mahone's, G. T. Anderson's, Wofford's, and Davis'saround Hancock's left flank. Attacked in flank and front, Hancock's troops were routed and
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
Index. Acquia Creek, Va., 102, 135. Addison, Joseph, quoted, 171. Alexander, Colonel E. P., mentioned, 231, 253, 292, 293. Amelia Court House, Va., 379, 380, 383. Anderson, Colonel G. T., mentioned, 212. Anderson, General, mentioned, 141, 206, 254; at Gettysburg, 279, 288; succeeds Longstreet, 331; recalled, 352; at Five Forks, 376. Anderson, General, Robert, mentioned, 87. Andrew, Governor John A., mentioned, 145. Antietam, battle of, 208. Appomattox Court House, VAnderson, General, mentioned, 141, 206, 254; at Gettysburg, 279, 288; succeeds Longstreet, 331; recalled, 352; at Five Forks, 376. Anderson, General, Robert, mentioned, 87. Andrew, Governor John A., mentioned, 145. Antietam, battle of, 208. Appomattox Court House, Va., 386, 387. Arab couplet quoted, 114. Archer's brigade at Gettysburg, 296. Aristo, General, Mariano, 32. Arlington Heights, 108. Arlington House, Va., mentioned, 26, 49, 63, 65, 71, 72, 76, 77, 85, 88, 89, 99, 198, 366. Arlington slaves liberated, 236, 238. Armies of the Confederacy, 326. Armistead, General, Lewis, mentioned, 58, 288; killed at Gettysburg, 296. Army of the James, 387. Army of Northern Virginia, 311, 312, 348, 379, 386. Army of the Potomac, 173, 182, 309
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Grand movement of the Army of the Potomac- crossing the Rapidan-entering the Wilderness- battle of the Wilderness (search)
. Volunteer Engineers, Brig.-Gen. H. W. Benham. Confederate Army. organization of the Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General Robert E. Lee, August 31st, 1864. First Army corps: Lieut.-Gen. R. H. Anderson, Commaanding. [Longstreet until wounded] Maj.-Gen. Geo. E. Pickett's division. Brig.-Gen. Seth M. Barton's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. M. D. Corse's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Eppa Hunton's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Wm. R. Terry's Brigade. Maj.-Gen. C. W. Field's division. (b) Brig.-Gen. G. T. Anderson's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. E. M. Law's (c)) Brigade. Brig.-Gen. John Bratton's Brigade. Maj.-Gen. J. B. Kershaw's division. (d) Brig.-Gen. W. T. Wofford's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. B. G. Humphreys' Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Goode Bryan's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Kershaw's (old) Brigade. Second Army corps: Major-General Jubal A. Early, Commanding. Maj.-Gen. John B. Gordon's division. Brig.-Gen. H. T. Hays' Brigade. (e) Brig.-Gen. John Pegram's Brigade. (f) Brig.-Gen. Gordon's Brigade. (g
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance on Cold Harbor-an anecdote of the war- battle of Cold Harbor-correspondence with Lee-Retrospective (search)
her at that point that either side could detect directly any movement made by the other. Finding at daylight that Wright had left his front, Lee evidently divined that he had gone to our left. At all events, soon after light on the 1st of June Anderson, who commanded the corps on Lee's left, was seen moving along Warren's front. Warren was ordered to attack him vigorously in flank, while Wright was directed to move out and get on his front. Warren fired his artillery at the enemy; but lost sThere was no officer more capable, nor one more prompt in acting, than Warren when the enemy forced him to it. There was also an attack upon Hancock's and Burnside's corps at the same time; but it was feeble and probably only intended to relieve Anderson who was being pressed by Wright and Smith. During the night the enemy made frequent attacks with the view of dispossessing us of the important position we had gained, but without effecting their object. Hancock was moved from his place i
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sheridan's advance-visit to Sheridan-Sheridan's victory in the Shenandoah-Sheridan's ride to Winchester-close of the campaign for the winter (search)
thought that by the following Wednesday he might send his workmen out on his road. I gave him no further information however, and he had no suspicion of how I expected to have the road cleared for his workmen. Sheridan moved at the time he had fixed upon. He met Early at the crossing of Opequon Creek [September 19], and won a most decisive victory-one which electrified the country. Early had invited this attack himself by his bad generalship and made the victory easy. He had sent G. T. Anderson's division east of the Blue Ridge [to Lee] before I went to Harpers Ferry; and about the time I arrived there he started with two other divisions (leaving but two in their camps) to march to Martinsburg for the purpose of destroying the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at that point. Early here learned that I had been with Sheridan and, supposing there was some movement on foot, started back as soon as he got the information. But his forces were separated and, as I have said, he was very ba
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 13: making ready for Manassas again. (search)
was ordered to halt his division till he could advance his skirmishers. The Ninth Georgia Regiment, G. T. Anderson's brigade, was sent and followed at proper distance by the division. The skirmishers met the enemy's pickets in the Gap, drove them off, and followed till they in turn were met by a strong force and pushed back. The enemy's leading brigade reached the plateau running along the eastern side of the mountain, which, with his batteries and infantry, gave him command at that end. Anderson reinforced his Ninth by the First, then by his other regiments on the mountain-side, to the left of the Gap, and advanced till arrested by the impenetrable tangle of the mountain undergrowth. The Gap is a pass cut through Bull Run Mountain for the flow of a streamlet, through Occoquan Creek, to the waters of the Potomac. Its mean width is eighty yards. Its faces of basaltic rock rise in vertical ascent from one hundred to three hundred feet, relieved hither and thither by wild ivy, cre
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