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thdrawal of artillery to meet an anticipated flank. movement, was overwhelmed by a morning attack of Hancock's corps, in which he and a large part of his command were captured. After his exchange he was assigned, September, 1864, to command of Anderson's division of the army of Tennessee. In the corps of Gen. S. D. Lee he took part in Hood's Tennessee campaign, commanding the advance and occupying Florence, Ala., October 30th. He led a desperate charge in the battle of Franklin, and fought aing. Promotion to colonel was accorded him during this service, and he was promoted brigadier-general to date from the day of victory. He was on duty in the Potomac district, in command of a brigade of Georgia regiments subsequently under George T. Anderson, until January, 1862, when he was put in command of the army of Pensacola, relieving General Bragg. On March 3d he assumed command of the department of Alabama and West Florida, with headquarters at Mobile. In April, being promoted brigad
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
unded; Second rifles, i wounded; Fifth, 6 wounded; Sixth, 2 killed, 5 wounded. The writer regrets that he can find no record of the service of the Fifteenth South Carolina, in Drayton's brigade, and the Hampton legion infantry, in Wofford's. Gen. D. H. Hill, in his report of the action of his troops, refers to the brigade of Drayton in the following words: In answer to a dispatch from General Longstreet, I urged him to hurry forward troops to my assistance. General Drayton and Col. G. T. Anderson [the latter commanding a brigade of Georgians] came up, I think, about 3 o'clock, with 1,900 men. . . . Anderson, Ripley and Drayton were called together, and I directed them to follow a path until they came in contact with Rosser, when they should change their flank, march in line of battle and sweep the woods before them. . . . Anderson soon became partially and Drayton hotly engaged. . . . Three brigades moved up in beautiful order against Drayton and the men were soon beaten.
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
nth South Carolina regiments, until February, 1862, when he was assigned to command of Gen. Sam Jones' Georgia brigade. He was in charge of General Magruder's first division, including the Georgia brigade of Robert Toombs and his own under George T. Anderson, during the retreat from Yorktown, and the battles of Gaines' Mill, Savage Station and Malvern Hill, and other engagements of the Seven Days before Richmond. In the Second Manassas campaign he commanded a division of Longstreet's corps, Drr the fighting of September 20th, he was in the grand line of veterans with which Longstreet overwhelmed the Federals, commanding McLaws' division, and in the last grand assault on George H. Thomas also commanding McNair's, Gracie's, Kelly's and Anderson's brigades. He drove the enemy into their lines at Chattanooga, and subsequently participated in the Knoxville campaign, at Bean's Station and other engagements commanding the division. In the same command he went into the Wilderness campaign
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
profession. Charles E. McCulloch Charles E. McCulloch, of Greenville, for about a quarter century identified with the interests of that city, is a native of Georgia, born in DeKalb county, February 5, 1843. He is the son of John McCulloch, a native of Edinburgh, Scotland, who became a planter in Georgia and married Mary Crowley, a native of that State. Mr. McCulloch enlisted, May 31, 1861, in the Seventh Georgia regiment of infantry, distinguished during the war as a part of Gen. George T. Anderson's brigade, Longstreet's corps. He served with his regiment throughout the war, fighting in many important battles, notable among which were First Manassas, Malvern Hill, Second Manassas, Fredericksburg, Suffolk, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, the fighting around Petersburg, and on the retreat to Appomattox, where he was surrendered. At Second Manassas he was captured while waiting upon his older brother, James McCulloch, of the same company, who had been mortally wounded; but he was
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
ld gain no headway. General Magruder highly commended the skill of General McLaws, division commander, and the personal daring and coolness of General Cobb. Colonel Anderson's brigade, it has been noticed, came to the rescue at the most important moment, winning special distinction, and later, says Magruder, Brigadier-General Toombs, commanding the division which included Anderson's brigade, advanced with his own brigade under Gen. P. J. Semmes, and supported Cobb and Anderson at the close of the fight, which ended at nightfall. This action brought credit to some of Georgia's most brilliant commanders, and to troops which became famous in many subsequentAnderson at the close of the fight, which ended at nightfall. This action brought credit to some of Georgia's most brilliant commanders, and to troops which became famous in many subsequent battles. After the abandonment of Yorktown and the gallant fight at Williamsburg, there was an attempt on the part of the Federals to land troops near West Point, Va., which brought on an engagement May 7th, in which the Eighteenth Georgia, Col. W. T. Wofford, of Hood's brigade, and the Nineteenth, of Hampton's brigade, partic
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
ederates followed up among the rocks of Devil's Den, Benning's and Anderson's brigades, until then in the second line, were brought forward, af the brigade was given at about 400 on the 2d, and in all 509. Anderson's Georgians made three charges upon the enemy, at the base of the ill, marked by desperate fighting, and in the second of these, General Anderson was severely wounded, the command devolving upon Lieut.-Col. Wons were fighting at Little Round Top, Wright's Georgia brigade of Anderson's division, A. P. Hill's corps, had the honor of gaining the creste following day, the high tide of the Confederacy dashed in vain. Anderson struck the Federal line just north of McLaws, and Wright's Georgians were on the north end of Anderson's line, the extreme left of the fighting line on the right of the army. They marched for more than a mild to move forward upon a line with the sections commanded by Lieutenants Anderson, Payne and Furlong, the latter commanding two guns of the Pu
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
nderson and Henry L. Benning. In Ewell's corps, John B. Gordon's brigade was a third of Early's division, and one of the five brigades of Rodes' division was George Doles' Georgians. In A. P. Hill's corps were the brigade of Ambrose R. Wright, Anderson's division, and the brigade of Edward L. Thomas, Wilcox's division. Callaway's and Carlton's Georgia batteries were in the artillery of Longstreet's corps, commanded by a Georgian, Gen. E. P. Alexander. Milledge's battery was with the Second ce in the morning, much more decisive results would have followed. On the same day this marvelous army, under the immortal Lee, was not only pounding the enemy, over twice its number, on the front and right flank, but Longstreet, coming up, sent Anderson's and Wofford's Georgians with Mahone's Virginians to attack his left flank and rear, while Benning and Bryan fought in front. The movement was a complete success, and the Federal line was routed with heavy loss. It seemed at this moment that
nd reported him wounded and carried from the field. I sent a messenger to LieutenantGen-eral Longstreet for reinforcements, and at the same time sent to Gens. George T. Anderson and Benning, urging them to hurry up to my support. They came up, joined as, and fought gallantly, but as fast as we would break one line of the enemy, in to our right and front, and from his lines to our left. Having no attack from us in front, he threw his forces from there on us. Before the arrival of Generals Anderson and Benning, Col. J. C. G. Key, who gallantly led the Fourth Texas regiment in, up to the time of receiving a severe wound, passed me, being led to the rear.fell while gallantly leading his regiment in one of the impetuous charges of the Fourth and Fifth Texas on the fortified mountain. Just after the arrival of General Anderson on my left, I learned that the gallant Col. Van H. Manning, of the Third Arkansas, had been wounded and carried from the field, and about the same time I rec
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
G. Skinner. Third Virginia, Colonel Joseph-Mayo, Jr. Seventh Virginia, Colonel C. C. Flowerree. Eleventh Virginia, Colonel M. S. Langhorne. Twenty-fourth Virginia, Lieutenant-Colonel R. L. Maury. Field's division. inspection report of this division for August 30, 1864, shows that it also contained Benning's and Gregg's brigades. The return shows but two Brigadier-Generals present for duty; names not indicated. Major-General C. W. Field. Anderson's brigade. Brigadier-General G. T. Anderson. Seventh Georgia, Colonel G. H. Carmical. Eighth Georgia, Colonel J. R. Towers Ninth Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel E. F. Hoge. Eleventh Georgia, Colonel F. H. Little. Fifty-ninth Georgia, Colonel Jack Brown. Law's brigade. Colonel P. D. Bowles. Fourth Alabama, Colonel P. D. Bowles. Fifteenth Alabama, Colonel A. A. Lowther. Forty-fourth Alabama, Colonel W. F. Perry. Forty-seventh Alabama, Colonel M. J. Bulger. Forty-eighth Alabama, Lieutenant-Colonel W. M. Hardwick.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 39 (search)
ved part of the time in Johnson's provisional division. Brigadier-General J. B. Robertson-Colonel Van H. Manning. Third Arkansas, Colonel Van H. Manning. First Texas, Captain R. J. Harding. Fourth Texas, Colonel John P. Bane and Captain R. H. Bassett. Fifth Texas, Major J. C. Rogers and Captains J. S. Cleveland and T. T. Clay. Anderson's brigade. did not arrive in time to take part in the battle. Jenkins's brigade assigned to the division September 11, 1863. Brigadier-General George T. Anderson. Seventh Georgia. Eighth Georgia. Ninth Georgia. Eleventh Georgia. Fifty-ninth Georgia. Benning's brigade. Brigadier-General H. L. Benning. Second Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel William S. Shepherd and Major W. W. Charlton. Fifteenth Georgia, Colonel D. M. DuBose and Major P. J. Shannon. Seventeenth Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel Charles W. Matthews. Twentieth Georgia, Colonel J. D. Waddell. Corps Artillery. did not arrive in time to take part in the battle.
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