hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 59 3 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 4 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for George T. Anderson or search for George T. Anderson in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 3 document sections:

the latter further to the north, by Hopewell Gap. Before these troops reached their destination, the enemy advanced and attacked Jones's left, under Brigadier-General G. T. Anderson. Being vigorously repulsed, he withdrew to his position at the eastern end of the gap, from which he kept up an active fire of artillery until dark,igade, was posted along the mountain on the left; General Hood, with his own and Whiting's brigade, under Colonel Law, Drayton's, and D. R. Jones's, under Colonel G. T. Anderson, on the right. Batteries had been placed by General Hill in such positions as could be found, but the ground was unfavorable for the use of artillery. T reenforced by the brigades of Ripley, Colquitt, and Garland, under Colonel McRae, of D. H. Hill's division, and afterward by D. R. Jones's brigade, under Colonel G. T. Anderson. The enemy's lines were broken and forced back, but fresh numbers advanced to their support, and they began to gain ground. The desperate resistance t
uly: On the morning of the twenty-seventh ultimo, the Third brigade, Colonel G. T. Anderson commanding, occupied the works around Mrs. Price's house. The First br equal to ours. I am, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, G. T. Anderson, Colonel, commanding Brigade. Battles of June 29 and 30, and July 1, 1 good conduct. I am, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Geo. T. Anderson, Colonel Eleventh Georgia Volunteers, commanding Brigade. Reports of e finally brought into action. Lieutenant Benning, First Georgia regulars, of Anderson's brigade, reporting his presence, with a company of that regiment which had bes. headquarters Ninth regiment Georgia volunteers, July 13, 1862. Colonel G. T. Anderson: sir: In pursuance of an order from headquarters of the division, re regiment Georgia volunteers, camp near Richmond, Va., July 12, 1862. Colonel George T. Anderson, commanding Third Brigade, First Division, A. P.: sir: In obedienc
vans and D. R. Jones, the latter under Colonel G. T. Anderson, moved forward to occupy this position,) Drayton's and D. R. Jones's, (under Colonel G. T. Anderson,) were extended to the right. Major-G relief. D. R. Jones's brigade, under Colonel G. T. Anderson, came up about the same moment, and sourg, on the sixteenth and seventeenth. Colonel G. T. Anderson, commanding D. R. Jones's brigade, at to my assistance. General Drayton and Colonel G. T. Anderson came up, I think, about three o'clock, or three hundred men under command of Colonel G. T. Anderson, to the hill already described, commantone wall, on the Hagerstown road, and Colonel G. T. Anderson had about a regiment behind a hill, imnding Jenkins's brigade. Report of Colonel G. T. Anderson, commanding brigade. headquartersd. I am, sir, your obedient servant, George T. Anderson, Colonel Eleventh Georgia Volunteers, c my own brigade, General Drayton's and Colonel G. T. Anderson's brigades. When Major-General Longst