Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 11, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for J. R. Anderson or search for J. R. Anderson in all documents.

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False alarm. --Between 10 and 11 o'clock on Saturday night, an alarm of fire was sounded in the lower ward, and a crowd assembled at the corner of Main and 14th streets, where it was supposed a disastrous conflagration was about to break out. Nothing was seen to confirm the idea, except two thin volumes of smoke issuing from the chimneys of Green & Anderson's store. The Hook and Ladder Company examined the premises, and reported all safe, but a light in the room over Noah Walker's clothing store, adjoining, renewed the apprehensions of the throng. A fireman mounted a ladder and opened a window, and found the gas burning and the occupant slumbering quietly within. Had he "waked up" at that moment, his amazement would have been considerable. Finding no fire in this neighborhood, the brigade rushed off down town, where another chimney was reported to be smoking, but we believe no exertion was necessary to "prevent the spread of the flames."
Fort Sumter. If it be true that Fort Sumter cannot be taken, even with its present small garrison, except at an enormous expense of human life, and if it be also true that it can be readily starved out, we can scarcely suppose it possible that an assault upon it is meditated. We have heard that Major Anderson has not supplies on hand for more than-thirty days. If that be true, is it not better to wait thirty, or sixty, or ninety days, than to waste so many valuable lives upon an object which can be attained simply by cutting off his supplies? Good Generals make it a point to accomplish the greatest results with the smallest possible expenditure of life, and, we take it for granted, that the brilliant and experienced officer in command of the Confederate troops at Charleston will not depart from that principle.
ront of the battery is about four feet thick, made so by four thicknesses of Palmetto logs and the planking and iron. If they can ever get it securely anchored, Anderson may vent his rage and it will all bebortive. Anderson has not a mortar in his prison at all, and if he throws shells it will be out of a Columbiad, and they are Anderson has not a mortar in his prison at all, and if he throws shells it will be out of a Columbiad, and they are said to be entirely unsuited to that work. Fort Sumter is the hollow tree, Anderson is the old buck hare--we will smoke him out. What is Mr. Wise doing? Tell him, if you please — tell him secretly, whisper it close to his ear, don't let anybody hear it, by any means — that our people are inquiring daily what can he be aboutAnderson is the old buck hare--we will smoke him out. What is Mr. Wise doing? Tell him, if you please — tell him secretly, whisper it close to his ear, don't let anybody hear it, by any means — that our people are inquiring daily what can he be about, and tell him, (so that the Republicans can't hear it,) that we will meet him on the common battle-field before long, in that modern Sodom and Gomorrah, when fire shall rain on that devoted city. Of representative men, Bishop Lynch is the representative of the one caste of the Catholic Church in this city, and Father O'Niel
Prayer. --One morning last week, in the Fulton street prayer meeting, N. Y., a letter was read from Maj. Anderson, asking prayers of the meeting for himself and country; expressing great confidence in his ability to take care of himself; and indicating that the good Providence of God has been his guide thus far.