Your search returned 2,803 results in 384 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
at gentleman made a speech, wherein he related a conversation with the President, which he claimed showed a breach of faith on the part of the latter, leading to the former's resignation. He also counselled resistance to Federal coercion. Speeches were made by Lieutenant-Governor Montague, Attorney-General Tucker, and others. The policy of the Legislature was severely commented upon. Abolitionists attempted to hold a meeting at Rochester, N. Y. It was broken up by citizens, and resolutions in favor of the Union were passed, and cheers given for General Scott and Major Anderson. A flag bearing the inscription, No compromise with slavery, was not allowed to be suspended across Buffalo street. The authorities prevented a general riot.--N. Y. Herald, Jan. 12. Both branches of the New York Legislature adopted strong Union resolutions, tendering the assistance of the State to the President, and ordered them sent to the President, and the Governors of all the States.--(Doc. 20.)
the United States in his department and under his charge. J. Holt, Secretary of War. By order of the Secretary of War. S. Cooper, Adjutant-General. --Evening Post, March 4. The Secretary of War at Washington received a despatch from Major Anderson, in which he contradicts the statement that President Davis had been to Charleston. He says that the report that he had been sick is without a particle of foundation. He is in good health, as is also his little band of soldiers. Affairs inlittle band of soldiers. Affairs in Charleston harbor are arriving at a point when further delay on their part will be impossible. Their extensive works of defence and attack are nearly if not quite completed. The feeling between the authorities and Major Anderson continues to be friendly, and he is allowed all the facilities that he could expect. Fresh provisions and marketing are supplied in abundance. He experienced no difficulty in sending or receiving his mail matter.--Washington Star.
t of the Confederate States, issued a proclamation calling upon the organized military of the State for fifteen hundred infantry.--Georgia Republic, March 25. Dr. Fox, of the United States navy, a special messenger from the Government to Major Anderson, reached Charleston and visited Fort Sumter by permission, in company with Captain Hartstein. Intercepted despatches --by which we are to understand stolen letters --subsequently disclosed to the authorities in Charleston, it is said, that Mr. Fox employed this opportunity to devise and concert with Major Anderson a plan to supply the fort by force; and that this plan was adopted by the United States Government.--Times, March 23 and April 13. A meeting was held at Frankfort, Alan,, at which the following resolutions, among others of a similar character, were passed: Resolved, That we approve the course pursued by our delegates, Messrs. Watkins and Steele, in convention at Montgomery, in not signing the so-called secession
March 25. Colonel Lamon, a Government messenger, had an interview at Charleston with Governor Pickens and General Beauregard.--Times, March 26. The rumors from Charleston are very conflicting concerning the evacuation of Fort Sumter. One report states that Major Anderson is strengthening his position; another, that he has received orders to evacuate the fort and report himself for duty at Newport barracks, and that the officers are packing their goods in expectation of immediate departure. The truth of the matter will probably be known in a day or two.--Evening Post.
April 7. General Beauregard issued an order, and sent a special messenger to Major Anderson, to give him an official notification that no further intercourse between Fort Sumter and the city would be permitted.--Times, April 9. The steam transport Atlantic sailed under sealed orders from New York, laden with troops and provisions. Among the troops is Captain Barry's celebrated company of United States Flying Artillery.--Commercial Advertiser, April 8.
end supplies to Fort Sumter by an unarmed vessel, they were informed that the vessel would be fired upon and not permitted to enter the port. Official notification was then given by the United States Government that supplies would be sent to Major Anderson, peaceably if possible, otherwise by force. Lieutenant Talbot, attached to the garrison of Fort Sumter, and who accompanied the bearer of this despatch, was not permitted to proceed to his post. Orders were isssued to the entire militard hostilities. The Home Guard corps of old gentlemen, who occupy the position of military exempts, rode through the city, arousing the soldiers, and doing other duty required by the moment. United States vessels were reported off the bar. Major Anderson displayed signal lights during the night from the walls of Fort Sumter.--Times, April 10. The State Department at Washington replied to-day to the Confederate State Commissioners, declining to receive them in their official capacity, but
ect of their mission unaccomplished; and they express the firm conviction that war is inevitable.--(Doc. 51.)--World, April 12. At 2 P. M. Colonel Chesnut and Major Lee, aids to General Beauregard, conveyed to Fort Sumter the demand that Major Anderson should evacuate that fort. Major Anderson replied at 6 P. M. that his sense of honor and his obligations to his Government would prevent his compliance with the demand. He informed the gentlemen verbally that he would be starved out in a feeral Beauregard, conveyed to Fort Sumter the demand that Major Anderson should evacuate that fort. Major Anderson replied at 6 P. M. that his sense of honor and his obligations to his Government would prevent his compliance with the demand. He informed the gentlemen verbally that he would be starved out in a few days. It was stated that there were at this time 7,000 men around Fort Sumter under arms, 140 pieces of ordnance of heavy calibre in position and ready for use.--Charleston Mercury.
April 12. At 1 A. M. a second deputation from General Beauregard conveyed to Fort Sumter the message that if Major Anderson would name the time when he would evacuate, and would agree not to fire in the mean time upon the batteries unless they fired upon him, no fire would be opened upon Fort Sumter. To this Major AndersonMajor Anderson replied that he would evacuate at noon on the 15th, if not previously otherwise ordered, or not supplied, and that he would not in the mean time open his fire unless compelled by some hostile act against his fort or the flag of his Government. At 3.30 A. M. the officers who received this answer notified Major Anderson that the bMajor Anderson that the batteries under command of General Beauregard would open on Fort Sumter in one hour, and immediately left. The sentinels in Sumter were then ordered from the parapets, the posterns were closed, and the men ordered not to leave the bombproofs until summoned by the drum. At 4.30 A. M. fire was opened upon Fort Sumter from Fort
g of the fort, and all company arms and property, and all private property; and all proper facilities to be afforded for their removal to any post in the United States the commander might elect. No men were hurt in Sumter by the fire of the enemy. It is reported by the secessionists that no men were either killed or wounded upon their side. A boat from the United States squadron outside, with a flag of truce, arrived at Morris' Island, with a request to be allowed to come and take Major Anderson and his forces.--(Doc. 52.)--Tribune, Times, Herald, and World. A Despatch from Montgomery, Ala., says that Fort Pickens was reinforced last night.--(Doc. 53.) To-day the President expelled from the Federal army, for refusing to act on a particular service, Captain William B. St. Johns, of the Third Infantry, and First Lieutenant Abner Smead, of the First Artillery. The Legislature of Pennsylvania passed the war bill without amendment last evening. Previous to its passage
April 15. Major Anderson evacuated Fort Sumter, going out with the proper honors to his flag. While the salute of fifty guns was being fired, a gun exploded, and killed one man and wounded four others. Major Anderson and his command were conveyed on board the Baltic steam transport.--Times, April 16. The President of the United States called by proclamation for 75,000 volunteers to suppress insurrectionary combinations; and commanded the persons composing the combinations aforesaidMajor Anderson and his command were conveyed on board the Baltic steam transport.--Times, April 16. The President of the United States called by proclamation for 75,000 volunteers to suppress insurrectionary combinations; and commanded the persons composing the combinations aforesaid to disperse and retire peaceably to their respective abodes within twenty days. In the same proclamation, an extra session of both Houses of Congress was called for the 4th of July.--(Doc. 57.)--Times, April 15. At Alexandria, Va., the publication of President Lincoln's proclamation has greatly increased the secession feeling. Business of all kinds is completely suspended. Merchants are engaged in discussing the probability of a prolonged sanguinary civil war. The impression is that the
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...