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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
am Nelson. by General Nelson's force from Prestonburg, on the Big Sandy River. He sent November, 1861. ColoneI Still, with nearly one-half of that force, Sill's troops for this occasion were the Thirty-third Ohio (his own regiment), a light battalion, under Major Hart, composed of portions of the Second, Thirty-third, and Fifty-ninth Ohio, and two Kentucky companies; one hundred and forty-two mounted men, mostly teamsters, commanded by Colonel Metcalf; thirty-six volunteers, under Colonel Apperson, and a section of artillery (two rifled 6-pounders), under Colonel Roher Vacher. to march by way of John's Creek to gain the rear of Williams at Piketon, whilst with the remainder he should move forward and attack his front, so bringing him between two fires and compelling him to surrender. Some one, counting positively on success, telegraphed to Washington that this result had been accomplished, and that a thousand prisoners had surrendered. The whole country was thrilled by the good
d driven away without serious loss on either side. A considerable Rebel force, under Col. John S. Williams, having been collected at Piketon, the capital of Pike, the easternmost county of Kentucky, at the head of the Big Sandy, Gen. Wm. Nelson, commanding the Union forces in Eastern Kentucky, started from Prestonburg, Nov. 8th, in quest of them. Having not less than 3,000 men, while Williams reports his full strength at 1,010, Nelson had, at 11 o'clock, A. M., of the 7th, dispatched Col. Apperson, of the 33d Ohio, with nearly half his force, to gain the rear of Piketon by a circuitous route through that rugged, almost roadless region, so as to inclose the Rebels between two fires, and compel their surrender. It was first telegraphed that this movement had proved a perfect success; but Williams, who seems to have been thoroughly posted throughout, retarded Nelson's direct advance by smart, judicious skirmishing in the positions assuring him the greatest advantage, while he hurrie
ember General Nelson despatched Colonel Sill with his own regiment, the Ohio Thirty-third, and the light battalion under Major Hart, Kentucky Volunteers, composed of a flank company from each of the regiments, the Second, Thirty-third, and Fifty-ninth O. V. U. S. A., and two Kentucky companies, together with one hundred and forty-two mounted men, under command of Colonel Metcalf, Kentucky Volunteers, made up of men mounted from the wagon teams, and thirty-six gentlemen volunteers, under Colonel Apperson, and a section of artillery, to march by the way of John's Creek and pass to the left of Pikeville, where the rebels had taken position — a distance of forty miles--and turn or cut them off. Colonel Sill marched at eleven A. M. on the 7th. At five A. M. of the 8th General Nelson moved forward with the Second regiment O. V. U. S. A., Colonel Harris; Twenty-first regiment O. V. U. S. A., Colonel Norton; Fifty-ninth regiment O. V. U. S. A., Colonel Fyffe; the battalion of Kentucky Volunte
ong the route, he found the house filled with the dead and wounded; curb-stones were wet with blood, and in one case, even the water of the well was crimson with gore. Gen. Benton's force consisted of the Eighth Indiana, Col. Shunk; a section of Manter's battery, First Missouri light artillery, Lieut. Schofield; part of the Eleventh Wisconsin, Major Platt; one howitzer from Bowen's battalion; the Thirteenth Illinois cavalry, Col. Bell, and a battalion of the Fifth Illinois cavalry under Major Apperson. After the battle, and while the wounded were being collected and cared for, another body of rebels appeared on the Bayou De View road and drove in our pickets. I immediately sent Lieut.-Col. Wood, of the Eleventh Wisconsin, with a force of infantry, and the First Indiana cavalry, to pursue and capture them. He proceeded to Bayou De View, shelled the rebels from their camp, and prevented the burning of the bridge, on which fagots had already been piled. By this time it was dark, an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
cacy that could not otherwise be procured for the use of the objects of their solicitude. But a few, comparatively, survive the lapse of years intervening since the great contest ended. Appended is a partial list, so far as can be recalled, of this famous and useful organization. Those who live deserve, as they receive, the gratitude of all surviving veterans, while the good deeds of those passed away are wreathed in memory that blooms sweetly and blossoms in the dust: 8 Members. Apperson, James L. Archer, Robert S. Ainslie, George A. Allen, Charles W. Burrows, Rev. J. L. Burress, James E. Beville, Wm. J. Bates, Charles Barney, Dr. C. G. Bailey, Samuel M. Cabell, Dr. J. G. Dooley, John Dudley, Thomas U. Doswell, Thomas W. Dibrell, R. H. Enders, John Exall, Henry Ellett, Andrew L. Eacho, Edward D. Edmond, Robert Ellyson, Moses Frayser, Lewis H. Glazebrook, L. W. Gatewood, Robert Goddin, Wellington Hobs
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
Fort Monroe. The suburbs of Jerusalem swarmed with militia from the Tidewater counties of Virginia and North Carolina; patrollers watched every by-road, or were in force on every suspected plantation. The rising was not as general as the leaders expected it to be. The most of the negroes remained loyal to their masters. But had it been more formidable, the white militia of the county alone would have been able to suppress it. C. M. Wallace. Roll of Dragoons. Allen, William. Apperson, James L.; dead. August, Thomas P., colonel; dead. Austin, John D. Austin, Isaac O., corporal. Baker, David, Jr.; died recently, aged 80. Blankenship, Radford. Beveridge. John W.; dead. Braxton, E. M. Brown, John, lieutenant. Binford, N. B. Cabell, Dr. J. Grattan, lieutenant; dead. Chevallie, John, of Chevallie's and Gallego Mills. Chevallie, Pierre, of Chevallie's and Gallego Mills. Cocke, Edward F. Cottrell, Samuel S., corporal; dead. Crenshaw,
The Daily Dispatch: November 7, 1860., [Electronic resource], Land and Slaves in the county of Amelia, for sale privately. (search)
By Goddin & Apperson, Auct's. Valuable Farm in Henrico, five miles above Richmond, Slaves and Stock, for sale.--Having determined to remove to Richmond to reside I will sell at public auction, on the premises, on Thursday, the 8th November, 1860, at 11 o'clock A. M., (if fair; if not, on first fair day thereafter,) the Farm on which I now reside, lying on the Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad, five miles above Richmond, containing 170 acres of land. After the sale of the land, I will seiture one Rockaway, and two Carts, and whatever also there may be on the farm for sale. Terms.--For the land, a credit of 1, 2, and 3 years, bearing interest, secure by personal and real security. For the slaves, a credit of 6 months, interest added, for negotiable notes and approved endorsers. For the residue of the personal property, cash for all sums under $50; over that amount, 6 months credit, for bonds with good security. Joseph Bernard, Sale by Goddin & Apperson, Aucts. oc 30
The Daily Dispatch: November 7, 1860., [Electronic resource], Land and Slaves in the county of Amelia, for sale privately. (search)
at Ashland, Hanover county, Va. --At the request of the Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad Company, we shall sell at public auction, at Ashland, Hanover county, on the said Railroad, 16 miles north of Richmond, 18 valuable Slaves, conveyed to said Company by Mr. Edwin Robinson. These Slaves are in families and are not only likely, but are of excellent character. They are all young, embracing Cooks House Servants, Washers, &c. Farmers and other persons disposed to purchase Servants for their own use, would do well to attend the sale; and to accommodate such, and to enable the Servants, as far as practicable, to obtain owners in this State, they will be sold on a credit of 4 months, for approved, endorsed negotiable paper, interest added. The sale will take place at Ashland, on Wednesday, the 14th November, 1850, at 10 o'clock A. M. Persons leaving Richmond in the morning cars can attend the sale, and return the same day by 2½ o'clock P. M. Goddin & Apperson, Auct'rs. no 1
By Goddin & Apperson, Auct's. Auction Sale of Eighteen valuable Slaves, at Ashland, Hanover county, Va.--At the request of the Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad Company, we shall sell at public auction, at Ashland, Hanover county, on the said Railroad, 16 miles north of Richmond, 18 valuable Slaves, conveyed to said Company by Mr. Edwin Robinson. These Slaves are in families and are not only likely, but are excellent character. They are all young, embracing Cooks House Servant, Washeor their own use, would do well to attend the sale; and to accommodate such, and to enable the Servants, as far as practicable, to obtain owners this State, they will be sold on a credit of 4 months, for approved, endorsed negotiable paper, interest added. The sale will take place at Ashland, on Wednesday, the 14th November, 1860, at 10 o'clock A. M. Persons leaving Richmond in the morning care can attend the sale, and return the same day by 2½ o'clock P. M. Goddin & Apperson, Auct'rs. no 1
The servants' accommodations are good. The location of this property is very desirable for a private residence. The taxes for 1861 to be paid by the purchaser. Bolling W. Haxall, Trustees. W. Goddin, Trustees. Sale conducted by Goddin & Apperson, Aucts. fe 6--tds P. S.--Although the deed requires a cash sale, yet we are authorized by the creditor to say, that in lieu of cash, the terms will be as follows, viz: One fourth cash; balance at 4, 8 and 12 months, for negotiable notedesirable for a private residence. The taxes for 1861 to be paid by the purchaser. Bolling W. Haxall, Trustees. W. Goddin, Trustees. Sale conducted by Goddin & Apperson, Aucts. fe 6--tds P. S.--Although the deed requires a cash sale, yet we are authorized by the creditor to say, that in lieu of cash, the terms will be as follows, viz: One fourth cash; balance at 4, 8 and 12 months, for negotiable notes, interest added, properly secured. Goddin &Apperson, Auctioneers. fe 20
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